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Learning Saxophone watch

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    Okay, I've just started teaching myself saxophone.

    I really want to get really good as soon as possible so should I get a teacher after I've taught myself the basics?

    Also, how far, with a LOT of practice, could I get in a year?

    Thanks
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    I couldn't tell you how far you will get in a year with alot of practice. Obviously, depends how quickly you pick things up.
    Also, getting a teacher after learning the basics would be a good idea, although alot of people find self-tuition much better.

    Goodluck!
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    (Original post by 123banana123)
    Okay, I've just started teaching myself saxophone.

    I really want to get really good as soon as possible so should I get a teacher after I've taught myself the basics?

    Also, how far, with a LOT of practice, could I get in a year?

    Thanks
    I'd personally do it the other way round - get a teacher for the basics, then learn by myself; you need a solid grounding in your technique. I think people often underestimate how far one can progress in a relatively short period of time. The greater your obsession (dedication and enjoyment) of the instrument, the further you'll get. Obviously nobody can tell you how far you'll get. Just don't think of any limits.

    If it would be of any inspiration, this guy supposedly did this in 2 years (albeit on the piano).
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    I agree with Starless. The Basics are the best. If you pick up bad habits at the beginning then you won't realise that you are doing it wrong until you get much more advanced, by which time it's usually quite hard to change. The key is practice, but i'm guessing we already knew that
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    Please please please buy a tuner and practice long notes getting them in tune. So many saxophone players can't play in tune because they think if they press the fingering for a certain note it will come out. This is not the case and as a result, many saxophone players just sound aweful.

    Also, i would advise some lessons to get the basics down and then take it on yourself. Saxophone isn't particularly hard to play once you've gotten making a noise sorted.
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    (Original post by hothedgehog)
    Please please please buy a tuner and practice long notes getting them in tune. So many saxophone players can't play in tune because they think if they press the fingering for a certain note it will come out. This is not the case and as a result, many saxophone players just sound aweful.

    Also, i would advise some lessons to get the basics down and then take it on yourself. Saxophone isn't particularly hard to play once you've gotten making a noise sorted.
    Do you actually play any musical instruments at all?!?! and I don't know what saxophonists you have been listening to... The OP is obviously not at the stage where he/she(not specified, let's say he for now) will be worrying about their tuning, he won't be playing immediately with anyone else so it will be quite hard to realise if he is playing at concert pitch tuning standards. Furthermore, it can take a long time for one to adjust to hearing the finer differences in tuning. Mastering any instrument requires a lot of skill and practice, for wind instruments you have to look at tone, tonguing, fingering skills, breath control and support, embouchure, tuning, sight-reading etc. If you are talking about making a noise, no, it isn't hard to make a noise, but if you want to make music, it's a whole different matter.

    Anyway, regardless of this squabbling, to the OP, finding a good teacher who doesn't charge you a crapload for nothing is hard. I would advise getting a teacher for the start though, at least until you learn how to practise in a systematic and productive way and so you don't pick up bad habits. It takes a long time and music is something that needs time to develop. If you are willing to put in a good solid hour or two each day, if not more, I'm sure you will be able to 'get good' in a short space of time. A year is pushing it, it all depends on how much you practise. You might not be able to practise that much at the beginning because your stamina and lip won't be ready but you can push up the time incrementally. I'd suggest starting with half an hour as a base practice time. Maybe even two half hours, get some good reeds, vandoren paris 2's I reckon, not ricos, for some reason, beginners always get given ricos.
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    (Original post by Clarity Incognito)
    Do you actually play any musical instruments at all?!?! and I don't know what saxophonists you have been listening to... The OP is obviously not at the stage where he/she(not specified, let's say he for now) will be worrying about their tuning, he won't be playing immediately with anyone else so it will be quite hard to realise if he is playing at concert pitch tuning standards. Furthermore, it can take a long time for one to adjust to hearing the finer differences in tuning. Mastering any instrument requires a lot of skill and practice, for wind instruments you have to look at tone, tonguing, fingering skills, breath control and support, embouchure, tuning, sight-reading etc. If you are talking about making a noise, no, it isn't hard to make a noise, but if you want to make music, it's a whole different matter.
    As a matter of fact, i do play the saxophone. I have grade 8 distinction on it as well as 2 grade 8s on other instruments so i think i'm qualified enough to talk about saxophone playing. Intonation is probably one of the most important things to start grasping once the initial learning how to play the fingerings and learning how to make a noise stages are over. No matter how technically proficient you become, if you're out of tune then you will sound bad. It's best to get good tuning going from an early stage so that it becomes natural and isn't something that you have to radically work on at a later stage. I also recommended getting a tuner so the op would not have to wait for such a long time to learn by ear what is in and out of tune. Playing long notes like I said in my first post is probably one of the best warm ups/ technical studies you can do. They allow you to work on your intonation, tone and breath control all in one go.

    Of course, mastering an instrument is going to be more than learning the notes and will take the op years to properly learn. I just think that if they want to be able to sound decent in a year then they should really consider intonation as a very major part of their learning.
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    (Original post by hothedgehog)
    As a matter of fact, i do play the saxophone. I have grade 8 distinction on it as well as 2 grade 8s on other instruments so i think i'm qualified enough to talk about saxophone playing. Intonation is probably one of the most important things to start grasping once the initial learning how to play the fingerings and learning how to make a noise stages are over. No matter how technically proficient you become, if you're out of tune then you will sound bad. It's best to get good tuning going from an early stage so that it becomes natural and isn't something that you have to radically work on at a later stage. I also recommended getting a tuner so the op would not have to wait for such a long time to learn by ear what is in and out of tune. Playing long notes like I said in my first post is probably one of the best warm ups/ technical studies you can do. They allow you to work on your intonation, tone and breath control all in one go.

    Of course, mastering an instrument is going to be more than learning the notes and will take the op years to properly learn. I just think that if they want to be able to sound decent in a year then they should really consider intonation as a very major part of their learning.
    Becoming reliant on a tuner isn't the way to go. Although, I do agree with the long notes being a good warm up. Concerning intonation, it is more of a natural development that comes with playing over a long time, it is not something one can just work at, like muscle memory, and then perfect in the subsequent days. Anyway, I am not arguing a vastly different point from yours, I only differ in stance on the importance of intonation at the beginning stages, one has to be able to play a note and get used to playing them before they will be able to grasp the finer tuning of a note, and that takes a lot of time, it might not even come in the first year, so to focus on something so avidly which will naturally impede progression, it will come with time. First diploma clarinetist and saxophonist.
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    (Original post by Clarity Incognito)
    Becoming reliant on a tuner isn't the way to go. Although, I do agree with the long notes being a good warm up. Concerning intonation, it is more of a natural development that comes with playing over a long time, it is not something one can just work at, like muscle memory, and then perfect in the subsequent days. Anyway, I am not arguing a vastly different point from yours, I only differ in stance on the importance of intonation at the beginning stages, one has to be able to play a note and get used to playing them before they will be able to grasp the finer tuning of a note, and that takes a lot of time, it might not even come in the first year, so to focus on something so avidly which will naturally impede progression, it will come with time. First diploma clarinetist and saxophonist.
    Practicing with a tuner won't make you reliant on one, it's just a good aid for someone who learns to play. Anyway, of course intonation is one of the things that develops when you play, as will other things like tone, finger even-ness and so on, I just don't think that people who self teach themselves wind instruments realise that you've got to tune with your mouth too. Lots don't realise that it's not like a guitar where the frets are the in tune note and if you press them with an in tune guitar it'll be in tune.
 
 
 
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