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    I didn't know where else to put this so I thought General was the safe bet.

    I recently failed at college due to problems meaning I didn't sit the exams, however I was given a normal grade like everyone else. But the thing is, for quite a few years I've got through on my teachers personal preference that they've let me do their courses based on my work for them, not on past grades, which I also did badly on because I wasn't too keen on school. But at 20, I really regret not doing better! And now I really want to go back and start it all again and eventually get to university! I know it'd be a long process, but I'd be willing to even go back to redo my GCSE's to start off. But I went to a careers advice centre and was told that because I'd already had past failings, not a chance would I ever do well. Even if I got top results from now on and got a great degree, my past failings would always stop me getting a job. So at 20, is it too late to start again? I really want to be a teacher, but they told me it was near enough impossible. Are 2nd chances gone now there are so many people passing?
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    Access courses at college?
    I'd suggest contacting connexions, they may be able to help.
    Whatever happens, don't let anybody stop you from achieving your dreams. There's always a way
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    It's never too late.

    If you believe and are willing to work hard, you can do it.

    Good luck.
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    No chance. Bitter truth, no chance.
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    No chance. Bitter truth, no chance.
    Totally unfounded, inaccurate and unfair.

    Think before you post!
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    Why would the 'past failings' prevent you from getting a job? All that matters in the long term, and I mean it, is whether or not you can do a good job as a teacher. A good degree can only carry you so far and you will eventually run into problems if you don't have what it takes to be a teacher. However, if you do have what it takes, you can find a way in even with a crappy degree.

    But even in the short term your past results shouldn't affect you past the stage of finishing school. You will be judged based on your latest results, then based on your degree, then your first job, and so on. If you're convinced it's what you want to do the most I would go for it and do what you've got to do!
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    (Original post by SomeStudent)
    Access courses at college?
    I'd suggest contacting connexions, they may be able to help.
    Whatever happens, don't let anybody stop you from achieving your dreams. There's always a way
    This OP! Make some connexions at Connexions. They're quite helpful.

    As has been said, it's never too late.
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    (Original post by Girl♥RadioHeart)
    Totally unfounded, inaccurate and unfair.

    Think before you post!
    What's unfair? That she didnt try hard enough to pass her exams?

    What's unfounded? That the likelihood of her becoming a teacher after failing crucial exams first time are slim and the odds are stacked against her.

    Inaccurate maybe, I'll give you that but do you know how much competition there is in teaching at the moment as a result of the recession? Every person being made redundant is applying for teaching because there's money to be made in it, and these people have GCSEs, A-levels and a degree to offer to employers. The OP has nothing. Maybe if she goes abroad and teaches, then fair enough, she's in with a chance after some hard work.
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    (Original post by SunFlowerStripes)
    I didn't know where else to put this so I thought General was the safe bet.

    I recently failed at college due to problems meaning I didn't sit the exams, however I was given a normal grade like everyone else. But the thing is, for quite a few years I've got through on my teachers personal preference that they've let me do their courses based on my work for them, not on past grades, which I also did badly on because I wasn't too keen on school. But at 20, I really regret not doing better! And now I really want to go back and start it all again and eventually get to university! I know it'd be a long process, but I'd be willing to even go back to redo my GCSE's to start off. But I went to a careers advice centre and was told that because I'd already had past failings, not a chance would I ever do well. Even if I got top results from now on and got a great degree, my past failings would always stop me getting a job. So at 20, is it too late to start again? I really want to be a teacher, but they told me it was near enough impossible. Are 2nd chances gone now there are so many people passing?
    Hey,

    It's never, ever too late to try and reach your ambitions and dreams. Don't let anyone ever tell you you can't do it or will fail. The only person who can tell yourself that is you and you don't want to get into that mindset. Whoever told you that at the career centre wants a serious talking to for knocking your confidence so much! Prove them wrong and surpass their expectations but above all, realise your own potential.

    I had a similar experience; I suffered from social anxiety in years 10 and 11 which resulted in me missing ALOT of school, I didn't attend for nearly 10 months. I developed a phobia of school and refused to even put my uniform on or look at the school. I felt physically sick at the thought of going.

    For the first few months, I refused to work and thought I could give up and fail. Then, my school told me I couldn't go on the French Exchange, something which in the haze of depression, I had forgotten about and not even considered but I used it as my aim and ambition as French was my passion. I began studying from home and knuckling down to get my GCSE's. Some teachers sent me work home and were really supportive, others gave up on me. I eventually got back to school and went on the French exchange. I have some great GCSE's (considering I taught myself!), AS Levels and received good A Levels but didn't get into my chosen Uni. I went through clearing and it's the best thing that ever happened, after feeling like a total failure and like I would never amount to anything, I now feel like I've achieved a huge ambition of mine and everyone is proud of me and really supportive!

    I worked my socks off at Uni and realised I could do whatever I put my mind to. I made a conscious effort to work hard and explore every avenue available to me. You can do the same. There is SO much you can do!

    Try somewhere like Open Learning College online. You can take courses in almost anything and alot of them require no qualifications or experience. You can learn from home too. If teaching's something you're interested in, contact a local education recruitment office for help and advice. Contact connexions or your local job centre. Aside from the plank who told you you wouldn't amount to anything, I've always found careers advisors helpful and friendly.

    You could enroll on an access course at a local college, redo your GCSE's and take it from there. So long as you have passes in the 3 core subjects (Maths, Science and English) you are already more qualified than a good percentage of the country!

    If you want anymore help or advice, please let me know! I hope this helped! I sympathise with you because I've felt how you do now and after spending the summer working in France, I think it goes to show that a little determination, strength, belief and hard work go a long way!

    Go for it and don't let anyone hold you back!! Good Luck!! :hugs:
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    What's unfair? That she didnt try hard enough to pass
    her exams?

    What's unfounded? That the likelihood of her becoming a teacher after failing crucial exams first time are slim and the odds are stacked against her.

    Inaccurate maybe, I'll give you that but do you know how much competition there is in teaching at the moment as a result of the recession? Every person being made redundant is applying for teaching because there's money to be made in it, and these people have GCSEs, A-levels and a degree to offer to employers. The OP has nothing. Maybe if she goes abroad and teaches, then fair enough, she's in with a chance after some hard work.
    It's unfair that you post on someone's concerned comment in a harsh manner, lending to them no doubt feeling worse about their situation. If that's your honest opinion, which the OP has asked for, fair enough but you could have worded it in a nicer fashion!

    I know plenty of people who have become successful teachers and professionals after failing exams. There are SO many options out there and nothing is impossible if you try hard enough. Learning from your mistakes is the first step to righting the wrongs and moving on! The OP realises where she went wrong and is looking to sort it out! The odds aren't against her at all!

    I'm aware of the current situation in teaching jobs and general employment, the OP will no doubt find this out herself when communicating with the companies/people I and other posters have suggested, but to say it'll never happen is a completely inaccurate assumption. Once the OP has some qualifications under her belt, she'll stand as good a chance as anyone. She'll have experience and proved she is willing to work extremely hard. I know situations in which someone with a degree has gone for a job against somebody with an NVQ and the latter got the job. Qualifications are sometimes just numbers and letters on a piece of paper. Employers want a guarantee they're attaining a hard working individual, not necessarily someone who can sit exams well.

    Please consider before writing a short answer on someone's clearly thoughtful and pensive post.
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    (Original post by Girl♥RadioHeart)
    It's unfair that you post on someone's concerned post in a harsh manner, lending to them no doubt feeling worse about their situation. If that's your honest opinion, which the OP has asked for, fair enough but you could have worded it in a nicer fashion!

    I know plenty of people who have become successful teachers and professionals after failing exams. There are SO many options out there and nothing is impossible if you try hard enough. Learning from your mistakes is the first step to righting the wrongs and moving on! The OP realises where they went wrong and is looking to sort it out! The odds aren't against her at all!

    I'm aware of the current situation in teaching jobs and general employment, the OP will no doubt find this out herself when communicating with the companies/people I and other posters have suggested, but to say it'll never happen is a completely inaccurate assumption. Once the OP has some qualifications under her belt, she'll stand as good a chance as anyone. She'll have experience and proved she is willing to work extremely hard. I know situations in which someone with a degree has gone for a job against somebody with an NVQ and the latter got the job. Qualifications are sometimes just numbers and letters on a piece of paper. Employers want a guarantee they're attaining a hard working individual, not necessarily someone who can sit exams well.

    Please consider before writing a short answer on someone's clearly thoughtful and pensive post.
    Whilst I appreciate that you're giving thought into this as a result of what you've been through, it's better to tell it like it is then to delude people just for the sake of keeping them happy, they'll be thoroughly disappointed in the end.

    I won't argue on this with you because you'd rather face away from the world than face reality (according to your sig)

    Reality is different. Good exam grades is indicative of hard work and thats what employers seek. Employers don't want too much hassle. And the OP has failed twice now so employers take that into account. But all the same, I'm impressed by your passionate responses. Hey! You gave a surreal response, I gave a response based on reality. :yep:
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    (Original post by Shivvling)

    Inaccurate maybe, I'll give you that but do you know how much competition there is in teaching at the moment as a result of the recession? Every person being made redundant is applying for teaching because there's money to be made in it, and these people have GCSEs, A-levels and a degree to offer to employers. The OP has nothing. Maybe if she goes abroad and teaches, then fair enough, she's in with a chance after some hard work.
    Urr... if she had to start from GCSE level... it'll be what... 8, 9 years before she's actually looking to become a teacher? You can't really use today's economy as a reason for why she won't get a teaching job in a decade's time.

    There was a teacher at my school who didn't graduate university (and it was the OU at that...) until her late 30's, and got a job at my school in her early 40's. Granted, she was a seriously crap teacher, but still... she was doing the job and getting paid.
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    Whilst I appreciate that you're giving thought into this as a result of what you've been through, it's better to tell it like it is then to delude people just for the sake of keeping them happy, they'll be thoroughly disappointed in the end.

    I won't argue on this with you because you'd rather face away from the world than face reality (according to your sig)

    Reality is different. Good exam grades is indicative of hard work and thats what employers seek. Employers don't want too much hassle. But all the same, I'm impressed by your passionate responses. Hey! You gave a surreal response, I gave a response based on reality. :yep:
    Fair enough. If that's your opinion, I won't dissuade you otherwise. I find sometimes living in your own reality is better than living in the real world. Might make me sound deluded or strange, but frankly, I don't care :yep:

    I understand exams are an indication of hard work but they aren't a real representation of a person. It is the person who can prove they are worth a chance. I don't think I'm deluding the OP in giving her hope and options. She has prospects and I think it unfair to state, outright and bluntly, that she is destined for failure, because I totally disagree.

    I appreciate your understanding and am glad we can be civil and agree to disagree! :wink2:
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    Whilst I appreciate that you're giving thought into this as a result of what you've been through, it's better to tell it like it is then to delude people just for the sake of keeping them happy, they'll be thoroughly disappointed in the end.

    I won't argue on this with you because you'd rather face away from the world than face reality (according to your sig)

    Reality is different. Good exam grades is indicative of hard work and thats what employers seek. Employers don't want too much hassle. And the OP has failed twice now so employers take that into account. But all the same, I'm impressed by your passionate responses. Hey! You gave a surreal response, I gave a response based on reality. :yep:
    Whether your assertion is accurate depends entirely on the actual ability of the OP. If they were to redo GCSEs and A levels and achieve predominately A grades. Then go to university and get a first, there is no reason whatsoever, why they could not go into teaching. If on the other hand, they failed because they simply lack ability, then they will most probably fail again and you would be right.

    It is a little presumptuous to assume they lack ability, don't you think?
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    (Original post by Chucklefiend)
    Whether your assertion is accurate depends entirely on the actual ability of the OP. If they were to redo GCSEs and A levels and achieve predominately A grades. Then go to university and get a first, there is no reason whatsoever, why they could not go into teaching. If on the other hand, they failed because they simply lack ability, then they will most probably fail again and you would be right.

    It is a little presumptious to assume they lack ability, don't you think?
    It is but I'm a stickler for facts and the facts are

    - she's done the SAME GCSEs twice consecutively (she didnt take a gap year) and still failed twice
    - OP getting A grades is unrealistic after failing twice, but could do if she worked so hard, so hard, that she wouldnt have a social life, she would get less sleep
    - getting a first class degree is no joke, a degree is uncomparable to GCSEs and shes still doing GCSEs when she could have been doing a degree at her age
    - Granted, after she archieves all you've said then she'll get a job, she'll still have to do abit of job-seeking (assuming she gets a 1st class degree)
    - if the OP was determined to do well, make changes and get onto good stead, she would be online here right now heeding the advice instead of going to sleep.
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    It is but I'm a stickler for facts and the facts are

    - she's done the SAME GCSEs twice consecutively (she didnt take a gap year) and still failed twice
    - OP getting A grades is unrealistic after failing twice, but could do if she worked so hard, so hard, that she wouldnt have a social life, she would get less sleep
    - getting a first class degree is no joke, a degree is uncomparable to GCSEs and shes still doing GCSEs when she could have been doing a degree at her age
    - Granted, after she archieves all you've said then she'll get a job, she'll still have to do abit of job-seeking (assuming she gets a 1st class degree)
    - if the OP was determined to do well, make changes and get onto good stead, she would be online here right now heeding the advice instead of going to sleep.
    I understand where you are coming from. But we have no way of measuring how much effort she put into these previous exams. Determination and hard work cannot be underestimated. I got 2 Bs, 1 C and 7 Us in my GCSEs first time round, for reasons I shall not go into. Consequently my parents sent me to a bording school and I got straight A stars. Ultimately, only the OP knows whether they were trying, or whether they can do much better.
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    - she's done the SAME GCSEs twice consecutively (she didnt take a gap year) and still failed twice
    - OP getting A grades is unrealistic after failing twice, but could do if she worked so hard, so hard, that she wouldnt have a social life, she would get less sleep
    - getting a first class degree is no joke, a degree is uncomparable to GCSEs and shes still doing GCSEs when she could have been doing a degree at her age
    - Granted, after she archieves all you've said then she'll get a job, she'll still have to do abit of job-seeking (assuming she gets a 1st class degree)
    - if the OP was determined to do well, make changes and get onto good stead, she would be online here right now heeding the advice instead of going to sleep.
    Man alive...
    -It doesn't matter how many times you do the exams if you get the grades.
    -Suggesting how her life would be if she chose to do her exams again is ridiculous... you can't apply one rule to everyone. You don't know the OP or how she would react/adapt to the changes needed to pass her exams to high levels, so don't PRESUME she'll sleep less etc
    -Age is irrelevant. You can get a degree at any age, at any point, for any reason. Just because she isn't going down the "normal" route doesn't have any damaging or irreparable effects!
    -Everyone has to job-seek. I know plenty of people with PhD's who have been "actively seeking work" for over a year now...
    -She may lack confidence, due to people like the douche at the careers centre who told her she would fail forever and people like you being presumptuous and stereotypical. Who cares when she goes to sleep...?

    I really think you should stop being so presumptuous and consider all the aspects before expressing a narrow opinion which isn't relying on hard evidence or fact. This is someone's situation, a real situation which needs constructive advice... you're naturally entitled to your opinion, but please, stop throwing ridiculous criticisms around!
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    (Original post by OP)
    I'd already had past failings, not a chance would I ever do well. Even if I got top results from now on and got a great degree, my past failings would always stop me getting a job.
    Rubbish.

    Just because you wern't sucessful the first time doesnt mean you never will be, anyone that tells you that is talking crap.

    I had similar problems as GirlRadioheart and missed 2 years of school , years 9 and 10,
    because of bullying. I passed my GCSE's with B's and C's.

    I got very demotivated and wasent going anywhere after my first year at 17. I passed my AS levels with two Cs but dint go on to A2.

    At 20, I resat my Maths GCSE in a year to get a B from a C so i could take maths a alev and restarted my A-levels after 4 years, Taking Maths, Physics, Geog and IT.

    I regret very much that I wasted 4 years, but im happy in what im doing now because in the end it's much better that the first time I tryed anyway. Im older and wiser and work much harder now, sure I learned the hard way, but I was never lazy at college.

    You could fast track 5 GCSE's, that would take a year, AS + A2 is a further two years, then a BSc is 3 years, so if you started again you would be looking at 6 years, which isnt that long.

    GCSE's asd A levels are a means to an end, they don't mean anything once you get your degree.

    Many have walked the path before you and suceeded, so there is no reason why you can't. I think your carrears advisor was a total numpty to tell you what he did, so don't let that or anything posted here dishearten you.

    One of my maths teachers, who is now an examiner for OCR failed his A levels originally and went to night school and retook them in a year and went on to get a degree in mathamatics.

    Choose somthing you enjoy and Good Luck.
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    (Original post by Pegasus2)
    Rubbish.

    Just because you wern't sucessful the first time doesnt mean you never will be, anyone that tells you that is talking crap.

    I had similar problems as GirlRadioheart and missed 2 years of school , years 9 and 10,
    because of bullying. I passed my GCSE's with B's and C's.

    I got very demotivated and wasent going anywhere after my first year at 17. I passed my AS levels with two Cs but dint go on to A2.

    At 20, I resat my Maths GCSE in a year to get a B from a C so i could take maths a alev and restarted my A-levels after 4 years, Taking Maths, Physics, Geog and IT.

    I regret very much that I wasted 4 years, but im happy in what im doing now because in the end it's much better that the first time I tryed anyway. Im older and wiser and work much harder now, sure I learned the hard way, but I was never lazy at college.

    You could fast track 5 GCSE's, that would take a year, AS + A2 is a further two years, then a BSc is 3 years, so if you started again you would be looking at 6 years, which isnt that long.

    GCSE's asd A levels are a means to an end, they don't mean anything once you get your degree.

    Many have walked the path before you and succeeded, so there is no reason why you can't. I think your carreers advisor was a total numpty to tell you what he did, so don't let that or anything posted here dishearten you.

    One of my maths teachers, who is now an examiner for OCR failed his A levels originally and went to night school and retook them in a year and went on to get a degree in mathamatics.

    Choose somthing you enjoy and Good Luck.
    You still can't spell though
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    Why should past failing hold you back? I'm sorry but in my eyes that careers advisor is talking out of his arse.

    If you went back and re-took your GCSE's, AS + A2's and got a degree, surely this would show commitment to a future emloyer. Just because of the past failings doesn't mean that the OP will do badly this time round. Maybe they have matured a bit and will be more motivated to sort out their current situation.

    At the age you're at aswell I think this is a brave decision and I wish you all the luck in the future!
 
 
 
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