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Isn't the whole government the executive? watch

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    In my book it says, "the executive is the 'sharp end' of government" and is "responsible for implementing government policy." This implies that there are other parts of the government aside from the executive, but it then says "the executive branch extends from the prime minister to members of enforcement agencies such as the police and the military, and includes both ministers and civil servants." Doesn't this kind of encompass the whole government?
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    Government is often used in a wider sense than just the government (ie, in Britain, 'Her Majesty's Government) to effectively refer to the whole state and its apparatus.

    I think referring to police and public services as part of 'the executive' is a bit unusual, but I suppose it's certainly possible to describe them in this way. If we're to accept that, then we get a system whereby you have HM Government at the top of the pile - as the Queen, Her Ministers, the PM etc - followed by the executive, ie the public services and everything that does anything, then followed by government more generally - ie, the executive plus the legislative and judicial branches.
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    Which book is this?
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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    Which book is this?
    Essentials of UK Politics by Andrew Heywood
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Government is often used in a wider sense than just the government (ie, in Britain, 'Her Majesty's Government) to effectively refer to the whole state and its apparatus.

    I think referring to police and public services as part of 'the executive' is a bit unusual, but I suppose it's certainly possible to describe them in this way. If we're to accept that, then we get a system whereby you have HM Government at the top of the pile - as the Queen, Her Ministers, the PM etc - followed by the executive, ie the public services and everything that does anything, then followed by government more generally - ie, the executive plus the legislative and judicial branches.
    Thanks, this (and the replies you've given to my other questions) has made the whole thing a lot clearer
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    (Original post by anna_disraeli)
    Essentials of UK Politics by Andrew Heywood
    Is your surname really Disraeli?
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    (Original post by Moe Lester)
    Is your surname really Disraeli?
    hahah yeah, sadly not a relation of benjamin disraeli though!
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    No. The executive branch, as your book rightly says, is the branch of government designated to implement the law. This inherently involves the management of day to day affairs of the state, including administration of public services (,e.g. the NHS), the management of the armed forces, the police, etc.

    It may be a bit confusing, since our Westminster System is a parliamentary system. But a member of the Cabinet would have hands on control over the administration of day to day government affairs, since s/he heads a government department. A backbench Labour MP would not. So the Secretary of State is a member of the executive, whilst the backbench Labour MP largely has a legislative role, even though both sit in the legislature.

    And the term "Her Majesty's Government" generally means the executive branch, containing the sovereign, the PM and his Cabinet, and all junior ministers".
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    As they said, no. The executive is simply the political party in power.
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    (Original post by Drew.)
    As they said, no. The executive is simply the political party in power.
    No the executive is the cabinet, the government is the ministers.
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    The executive/legislature/judiciary categorisation system doesn't work well in Britain. We simply do not have separation of powers. The executive almost always has total control of the legislature, and appoints the entirety of the judiciary. We have Charles I's government, only with an elected Charles I. Or not, in the case of Brown.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    No the executive is the cabinet, the government is the ministers.
    What constitutes the cabinet? The government.

    Government ministers employ cabinet conventions.
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    (Original post by Drew.)
    What constitutes the cabinet? The government.

    Government ministers employ cabinet conventions.
    No....

    As Wiki quite rightly says:

    'Under the British constitution, executive authority notionally lies with the monarch but is exercised by and on the advice of the Cabinet, a collective body of the Queen's most senior ministers. In UK parlance, "the Government" is usually a collective noun that refers to ministers of the Crown, who are all members of one or other of the houses of Parliament. '

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Governm...United_Kingdom

    eg

    The Minister of State for Pensions and the Ageing Society is not a Cabinet Minister, but is a Minister of the Crown so is a part of the Government but not the Executive. The Minister of State for Employment and Welfare Reform is in the Cabinet so is part of the Executive as is the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    No....

    As Wiki quite rightly says:

    'Under the British constitution, executive authority notionally lies with the monarch but is exercised by and on the advice of the Cabinet, a collective body of the Queen's most senior ministers. In UK parlance, "the Government" is usually a collective noun that refers to ministers of the Crown, who are all members of one or other of the houses of Parliament. '

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Governm...United_Kingdom

    eg

    The Minister of State for Pensions and the Ageing Society is not a Cabinet Minister, but is a Minister of the Crown so is a part of the Government but not the Executive. The Minister of State for Employment and Welfare Reform since in Cabinet so is part of the Executive as is the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions.

    Ok, cheers. I stand corrected.
 
 
 
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