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    If you wanted to make it really intense learning about your subject, could you?

    obviously you could do this by self study, but I mean could you take up a ridiculous number of topics over the required number and get entered for the exams in all of them, just as an extra motivation to learn about the topics?
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    No.
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    No you are given a set number of modules to chose from a list of options.
    You can however go to lectures randomly but you wont be examined on them.
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    Erm, I physically couldn't. There is not enough time in the day to fully explore/complete all the work that I'm set. However, if I did turn up to 2nd year lectures/tutes and it didn't affect my work, they'd let me take the exams.
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    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    If you wanted to make it really intense learning about your subject, could you?

    obviously you could do this by self study, but I mean could you take up a ridiculous number of topics over the required number and get entered for the exams in all of them, just as an extra motivation to learn about the topics?
    You're the one who's so set on doing ridiculous amounts of self-study, aren't you?

    For most subjects you can make your workload as 'intense' as you wish by doing more than what is absolutely required for the papers you're meant to be taking (by doing extra reading, preparing your pieces of coursework particularly thoroughly, etc). But if your course structure means you get to take, say, three papers a term, they are not going to let you take five and get assessed for them all. Obviously you can go to extra letures if you so wish, though, and if there's a spare place in seminars, you might be allowed to take part and do all the work except the final exam / piece of coursework, i.e. you'd be doing it just for the fun of it, and the only way anyone would know you did this later would be if the person who taught you on that extra seminar happened to be one of your referees.

    Anyway, I'd suggest that you don't worry so much about not being sufficiently stretched before you've actually started your course. It may turn out to be more challenging than you think, and then you'd have worried for nothing... Alternatively, since the idea of self-study seems to appeal to you so much, have you considered doing a degree with the OU instead? That would allow you to learn through self-study and at your own pace, and if that pace happens to be crazily fast, you might even be able to finish in under three years.
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    You have a set number of modules, but of course you can read around your subject as much as you like.
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    (Original post by JoMo1)
    Erm, I physically couldn't. There is not enough time in the day to fully explore/complete all the work that I'm set. However, if I did turn up to 2nd year lectures/tutes and it didn't affect my work, they'd let me take the exams.
    Aren't your second-year exams part of your finals (and consequently can't be taken until you've passed mods), though? Anyway, even if it was possible, surely it would be more in your college's interest if you were to achieve a stellar first in your mods and finals, than if they were to allow you to take them all at once and risk that you'd spread yourself too thin and not do as well as you might have?:dontknow:
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    You're limited by the number of credits. At my Uni, you do a maximum of 120 credits each year. Anything on top of that wont be counted towards your degree mark (as it's not fair on others).

    Second year exams count towards your degree, but are not part of your finals, but you can't enter your "honours year" without passing your second year. The Uni doesn't care about your degree classification, as there's no league table based on the number of 1st, 2:1, 2:2 and 3rds like you see with A-levels.

    If you want to go intense as it were, do a masters/doctorate degree after you complete your undergrad degree.
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    Hmmm, any reason why you can't take extra modules?
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    I can't even brush the surface of the required work/reading for my modules. Don't worry you'll have a great time!
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    In Scotland you can for first year, or at least you can at Glasgow, I imagine other places would be the same. Why you'd want to is beyond me.

    Can't you just watch daytime tv like the rest of us?
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    I'm at Warwick, and you have to take at least 120CATs, but you are able to take extra modules up to 150CATS. They use some knd of formula to scale the marks, so that they all count towards your degree. I'm doing 126CATs this year though and it's a hell of a lot of work!
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Aren't your second-year exams part of your finals (and consequently can't be taken until you've passed mods), though? Anyway, even if it was possible, surely it would be more in your college's interest if you were to achieve a stellar first in your mods and finals, than if they were to allow you to take them all at once and risk that you'd spread yourself too thin and not do as well as you might have?:dontknow:
    Yeah, that's what I meant by I would never have time!

    If you really did have time to completely cover everything(Which in maths, if you have a freakishly brilliant mind, no friends, and a room next to hall is possible) then they'd probably let you extend yourself like that, joys of the tutorial system and all that!
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    I think you severely underestimate the amount of work a uni module requires.
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    (Original post by thatwhichiam)
    I think you severely underestimate the amount of work a uni module requires.
    Aye, we have a 120 credit per year system at Uni, and for each credit we're meant to do 10 hours.

    As I think I've said somewhere else in the forum, we worked out that if we did the hours expected, we'd never get anytime to ourselves, save for 6 hours sleep a night.

    So while I doubt you'll get the option, if you do by all means take but don't expect it to be an easy ride as even a 120 credit year is extremely hard work.
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    It depends on which university you go to.

    I know someone who went to all the second year Physics lectures at Cambridge while doing first year Maths. The only reason that he didn't take the exams was that "I couldn't quite take IB physics this term and get a first".
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    Some do. Some don't. It also depends on your personal academic tutor. A friend of mine, for example, is taking ten units this year as opposed to the normal eight, and to do so had to get special permission. My academic tutor, however, won't allow me because he doesn't see the point in doing work that won't count toward your degree.

    Otherwise, though, you always have the option of self-studying, reading around your subject, and so on. Just go to your university library, pick up a book, and start reading.

    To make my studying more 'intense' and 'involved' I'm doing a lot of self-studying on the economic transition of Europe and how the Euro has (or hasn't) affected trade between EU countries and non-EU countries. It means I'm more motivated because I've a personal interest in the topic, and also I can learn it at a more leisurely pace since I'm not being examined on it.
 
 
 
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