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A-Levels preferred for studying Law in University. watch

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    (Original post by Tay594)
    Thanks, you have been so helpful!!
    I would definitely not take both Biology and Maths.
    Why would you choose Maths over Biology?
    Which would you say is the hardest?
    Well I do Maths and Chemistry, not Biology. But I've heard Biology is more just remembering things whereas Maths is learning formulae etc. and applying it more.

    To be honest, it's probably how you find them now. What I liked about Maths though is that it's a very gradual increase in difficultly; they lead you in very nicely from GCSE whereas all my other subjects (Chemistry, English Lit and History) were a big step up.

    If you're going to go for Biology over Maths, I'd probably change the other subject too (to perhaps MFL or something else more respected) whereas if you take Maths you could keep the other subject.

    Hope that makes sense
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    (Original post by Tay594)
    However, I am stuck on what to take for A-level.
    My choices so far are: History, Law, Psychology & Sociology.

    History - Very good choice.
    Law - well LSE consider it 'non-prefered subject' I wouldn't take it http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...cle5516630.ece (it also makes students hate the subject)
    Psychology - no. Choose another essay based subject like english language, or a problem solving subject like maths or a science
    Sociology - I again, I can think of better choices
    Ideally if I was starting A-levels in hindsight I would have chosen:

    History
    English Language
    Chemistry
    French/Government & Politics
    & perhaps General studies (because it takes 1 hour per week and gives some distinguishment between candidates and gives a signal of general intelligence :p:
    Completely up to you though - obviously the more prestigious universities want you to have an academic subject portfolio but the A-levels you've specificed wouldn't rule out law altogether to an admissions tutor.

    Goodluck.
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    (Original post by Tay594)
    Thanks, I am just really worried that I wouldn't get an A in English Lang, I am not bad at English but I'm not amazing.
    My two definite so far are History and Psychology.

    Thankyou xx
    I probably wouldn't go for straight English Language if you're worried, because a lot of unis are a little edgy about accepting it anyway.
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    If you won't take lit, I suggest Eng Language. And a foreign language if possible. Stick with History and Law and maybe swap my suggestions in for the other two. ??
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    (Original post by ParadigmShift)
    :dontknow: As you said, it depends on where the OP is going to apply. I think quite a few universities mightn't look on Sociology so favourably, but that's not to say I've got anything against it!
    Yeah well I think I'm definately going to drop Sociology.
    And I do want to apply to a Uni in the top 10 for Law so I do need really good choices.

    Now I'm thinking: History, Psychology, Biology/Maths, and Law (if I cannot find something else)
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    (Original post by Tay594)
    Yeah well I think I'm definitely going to drop Sociology.
    And I do want to apply to a Uni in the top 10 for Law so I do need really good choices.

    Now I'm thinking: History, Psychology, Biology/Maths, and Law (if I cannot find something else)
    I think that's a fine set. Shows a variety of skills, and not just the traditional set of History, English Lit and a language. :p:
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    philosophy always goes down well and i think a science as well as it demonstrates analytical skill
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    (Original post by Tay594)

    Now I'm thinking: History, Psychology, Biology/Maths, and Law (if I cannot find something else)
    IMO, if you're planning for a top 10 law university, Law A-level needs to go :P

    & A-level law will make you detest the subject, as well as equip you with an undesirable understanding of the law.
    It is generally said that lecturers spend the first year beating out A-level law from students and starting from scratch :yep:
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    I know people who got onto law with history, law, psychology and sociology. having said that it wasn't a top 10 university :dontknow:
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    (Original post by inksplodge)
    I know people who got onto law with history, law, psychology and sociology. having said that it wasn't a top 10 university :dontknow:
    Yeah, that's four A-levels (quite a workload), They aren't bad choices but there are better choies, that's all I'm saying
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    (Original post by Jakko247)
    IMO, if you're planning for a top 10 law university, Law A-level needs to go :P

    & A-level law will make you detest the subject, as well as equip you with an undesirable understanding of the law.
    It is generally said that lecturers spend the first year beating out A-level law from students and starting from scratch :yep:
    Doing law at a level will not make you detest the subject at all. You can do it at degree level and 'detest' the subject too, but all that shows is that it isn't the subject for you. Doing at a level just means you find out sooner rather than later.
    As someone who took it at a level, all I learned was the basics which is what they taught me in my first two weeks at university, i.e the heirarchy of the courts, the history of the legal system, research skills and the like. The fact is all I had to do was sit back and refresh my memory, whereas others who hadn't taken it had to take exhaustive notes and learn what I had in two years over two weeks.
    No college in their right mind would teach a subject that would be detrimental to a students degree.

    OP, take what you enjoy and what you will excel in. Don't take as subject because you feel you have to, thats just asking for failure. Univeristies don't hate a level law at all. Just take it alongside three more traditional subjects if you apply to the top unis.
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    (Original post by Tay594)
    Yeah well I think I'm definitely going to drop Sociology.
    And I do want to apply to a Uni in the top 10 for Law so I do need really good choices.

    Now I'm thinking: History, Psychology, Biology/Maths, and Law (if I cannot find something else)
    If you take A-levels that are considered 'traditional' and 'difficult' then top universities will look favourably on your application. Out of this pool of subjects I would choose the subjects you enjoy the most. I picked maths, further maths, physics and computing and have got offers from top universities.

    Out of the ones you have chosen, I would say law is the weakest A level. However if you are planning on taking all 4 to A2 level, then having law will not be a disadvantage, since you will have three very strong subjects.
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    To be honest, so long as you do at least 2 good academic subjects, it doesn't really matter what they are - at my school a lot of people applied for law, and they all did different subjects - one did all sciences, one did all arts subjects, they are now at LSE and UCL, and there were plenty more.
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    (Original post by thechosennerf)
    I probably wouldn't go for straight English Language if you're worried, because a lot of unis are a little edgy about accepting it anyway.
    i got in to top universities with english language...
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    (Original post by GeekPervert)
    Doing law at a level will not make you detest the subject at all. You can do it at degree level and 'detest' the subject too, but all that shows is that it isn't the subject for you. Doing at a level just means you find out sooner rather than later.
    As someone who took it at a level, all I learned was the basics which is what they taught me in my first two weeks at university, i.e the heirarchy of the courts, the history of the legal system, research skills and the like. The fact is all I had to do was sit back and refresh my memory, whereas others who hadn't taken it had to take exhaustive notes and learn what I had in two years over two weeks.
    No college in their right mind would teach a subject that would be detrimental to a students degree.
    http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...cle5516630.ece

    "Although the London School of Economics highlights law as a “non-preferred” A-level subject, Policy Exchange suggests that other highly selective universities hold the same view privately but are failing to make this clear in public.
    "
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    English lit or lit/lang is always useful, psychology is ok, sociology is not fantastic its a bit of a doss, law is ok it wil give you a taster of whats to come. but try and do english or a language.
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    o and if your going to apply to lse dont do law at a-level!
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    OP, I did psychology, sociology, law and politics and got all offers for 4/5 unis I applied for for Law, I think as long as you're achieving high grades you should be fine. However I wouldn't recommend subjects like Media or Art, those are usually considered soft subjects, especially if you're aiming for Law.
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    (Original post by GeekPervert)
    Doing law at a level will not make you detest the subject at all. You can do it at degree level and 'detest' the subject too, but all that shows is that it isn't the subject for you. Doing at a level just means you find out sooner rather than later.
    As someone who took it at a level, all I learned was the basics which is what they taught me in my first two weeks at university, i.e the heirarchy of the courts, the history of the legal system, research skills and the like. The fact is all I had to do was sit back and refresh my memory, whereas others who hadn't taken it had to take exhaustive notes and learn what I had in two years over two weeks.
    No college in their right mind would teach a subject that would be detrimental to a students degree.

    OP, take what you enjoy and what you will excel in. Don't take as subject because you feel you have to, thats just asking for failure. Univeristies don't hate a level law at all. Just take it alongside three more traditional subjects if you apply to the top unis.


    Thanks that was so much help!!
    I think I mainly want to do law because I just want to be sure that I'm making the right decision for Uni.
    What is it like in college? Also, what else did you take?

    Now I'm thinking: History, Law, Psychology & Biology.. does that sound okay?
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    History, English Lit, Foreign language- All good for Law.

    Law itself isn't a preferred subject at all, in fact some places prefer you not to have it (including Exeter). But if you want to know if you like the subject before taking it at degree level, it would make sense.

    Sociology is the softer subject, though of course most universities see it as fine, and it's mainly a case of how you do across the board rather than what you've taken.

    Psychology is maybe good for Law (in my opinion, and also my mum who studied Law at university seemed to think it might go quite well. :dontknow:) And obviously if Psychology is a career you're considering as well, take it.


    If you also get the chance to study Critical Thinking (as an extra) I'd recommend it as it would bring your analysis and critical skills up to a high level. Though it's always hit and miss if you get a good teacher or not... Something you don't know until you take it.
 
 
 
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