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    Reading this;

    http://oddee.com/item_88742.aspx

    Does it not make you feel slightly sad that we have killed off so many interesting and beautiful animals in a short period of time? Isnt it a shame we'll never get to see the largest deer in the world, or a half zebra, half horse? I know not all of them were killed by us (T-Rex wasnt!) but most on there were alive 300 years ago, and have been hunted to extinction. Should serve as a reminder to us all to protect what life we have so that future generations have something to appreciate as well.
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    Should do, but won't.
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    I'd rather a T-rex or a stupid horse-zebra didn't exist thanks.
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    Yes is is sad but as species become extinct, new species come about. It's something like 99% of all the creatures that have ever lived on Earth are now extinct, it was going to happen with or without us. I do think it's a problem when we're cutting down rainforests and destroying habitats though.
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    I've got over the fact that I will never see a live dodo.
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    (Original post by Yuppie20)
    I'd rather a T-rex or a stupid horse-zebra didn't exist thanks.
    Why? Would not seeing a T-Rex in the wild be amazing?
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    Naughty humans.
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    (Original post by Riderz)
    Why? Would not seeing a T-Rex in the wild be amazing?
    But would they be in the wild. No they would be locked up and a 20 by 20 cage. And I'd rather not be torn limb from limb for the sake of some focal pleasure.
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    Whilst it is true that species are naturally replaced anyway whether through the implosion of their niche or being outdone by a new, better species, I think that humanity has a lot to answer for in the destruction of so many species. It does make me sad that I'll never get to see things like Steller's Sea Cow, or a Tasmanian Tiger. It angers me more that we have failed to learn lessons from these events - their extinctions were meaningless. For example, in Tasmania, state-sanctioned logging of pristine temperate rainforest still continues, destroying the habitats of many aboriginal marsupials and destroying magnificent Houn Pines - some of the tallest and oldest trees in the world. Why? To supply Japan with ******* wood chips.

    Disgraceful.
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    Tbh I think that some species couldn't mutually exist.
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    I hate list websites, they trap me in their listful goodness. :grumble:
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    I've seen a quagga

    Spoiler:
    Show
    stuffed in a museum
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    Weren't Dodo's supposedly not very intelligent. Perhaps had they not been wiped out by mankind they would have been the architect of their own demise one way or another.
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    (Original post by chica_chica)
    Weren't Dodo's supposedly not very intelligent. Perhaps had they not been wiped out by mankind they would have been the architect of their own demise one way or another.
    lmao I just visualised a council of dodos trying to work out how to make themselves extinct. :ahee:

    And the Tasmanian Tiger has a really big mouth. :afraid:
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
    lmao I just visualised a council of dodos trying to work out how to make themselves extinct. :ahee:

    Lol
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    (Original post by Aphotic Cosmos)
    Whilst it is true that species are naturally replaced anyway whether through the implosion of their niche or being outdone by a new, better species, I think that humanity has a lot to answer for in the destruction of so many species. It does make me sad that I'll never get to see things like Steller's Sea Cow, or a Tasmanian Tiger. It angers me more that we have failed to learn lessons from these events - their extinctions were meaningless. For example, in Tasmania, state-sanctioned logging of pristine temperate rainforest still continues, destroying the habitats of many aboriginal marsupials and destroying magnificent Houn Pines - some of the tallest and oldest trees in the world. Why? To supply Japan with ******* wood chips.

    Disgraceful.
    haha avatar in your display pic? Very fitting.

    I'm in two minds when I think about how we have altered our world. If you got right down to it, the superior species wipes out it's weaker competitors. We are land owners as a species, what ever is in our way is a competitor, we want the space, their in it, we'll take it. That is nature in the raw.

    HOWEVER I'd also say we often do it when it is unnecessary. Also we over catch some prey items, and so their numbers are dwindling. Technically though as long as our prey is eaten sustainably, everything else doesn't matter, we own this world as a species, weaker ones are pushed aside, as stronger groups of chimpanzees will attack other groups, and eat the brains of their young.

    Avatar and district 9 make me feel bad though..because it's soo true, it's how it would happen. I just hope people don't expect mercy when a technologically advanced race wants Earth is a farming world, or to crack the planet to mine it of it's resources. Survival of the fittest isn't just Earth rules...
 
 
 
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