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UK to begin using spy drones to monitor population. Watch

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    (Original post by Phugoid)
    Yes, the government will be using the same spy drones it uses in Iraq and Afghanistan in places like Manchester.
    Is this how it really is? Can the government really make no distinction between its enemies and its own citizens?

    I say that, if this is the case, the citizens should take a similar point of view, and fail to make the distinction between the government and our enemies.

    Revolution is very quickly becoming a necessity in this country.
    I don't see much difference between those three.
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    (Original post by The Guardian)
    Police in the UK are planning to use unmanned spy drones, controversially deployed in Afghanistan, for the *"routine" monitoring of antisocial motorists, *protesters, agricultural thieves and fly-tippers, in a significant expansion of covert state surveillance.
    :rofl: What the hell is an antisocial motorist?

    I'm more worried about the implications to air safety. Having unmanned drones floating around in the middle of some of the world's most congested airspace has accident waiting to happen written all over it.

    It'll be interesting to see what the Conservatives make of all this.
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    (Original post by Student2806)
    I'm more worried about the implications to air safety. Having unmanned drones floating around in the middle of some of the world's most congested airspace has accident waiting to happen written all over it.

    It'll be interesting to see what the Conservatives make of all this.
    Unmanned =/= uncontrolled. Unmanned drones are still controlled directly from the ground, so there's just as much chance of something happening as if it were manned, and less really since they are tiny and would fly in completely different altitudes to planes :p:.
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    (Original post by Student2806)
    :rofl: What the hell is an antisocial motorist?

    I'm more worried about the implications to air safety. Having unmanned drones floating around in the middle of some of the world's most congested airspace has accident waiting to happen written all over it.

    It'll be interesting to see what the Conservatives make of all this.
    Conservatives have been against a lot of the regrettable attacks on civil liberties Labour have made over the previous 12 years, so hopefully they'll disagree with this too.
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    (Original post by FyreFight)
    It was hardly an unwarranted comparison.


    I believe that that bus stop is here:
    http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?f=q&so...12,292.28,,0,5
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    (Original post by Mithra)
    Unmanned =/= uncontrolled. Unmanned drones are still controlled directly from the ground, so there's just as much chance of something happening as if it were manned, and less really since they are tiny and would fly in completely different altitudes to planes :p:.
    Oh OK. The Guardian seems to be suggesting they're somewhat autonomous:

    "Far more sophisticated than the remote-controlled rotor-blade robots that hover 50-metres above the ground – which police already use – BAE UAVs are programmed to undertake specific operations. They can, for example, deviate from a routine flightpath after encountering suspicious *activity on the ground, or undertake numerous reconnaissance tasks simultaneously."
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    i think its time there was a rebellion
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    (Original post by Anony mouse)
    I wonder how long it will take before citizens are barcoded and micro chipped.
    The technology exists
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNPDg...eature=related

    Time to rise up. The problem is people will volunteer to give up their liberties to feel safer.
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    (Original post by sahil112)
    i think its time there was a rebellion
    You're going to get one. It's called the general election :p:
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    (Original post by domino0806)
    I don't see much difference between those three.
    The first two are war zones, the latter isn't.
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    (Original post by Student2806)
    You're going to get one. It's called the general election :p:
    lol thats true
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    One document lists "[detecting] theft from cash machines, preventing theft of tractors and monitoring antisocial driving" as future tasks for police drones, while another states the aircraft could be used for road and railway monitoring, search and rescue, event security and covert urban surveillance.

    Under a section entitled "Other routine tasks (Local Councils) – surveillance", another document states the drones could be used to combat "fly-posting, fly-tipping, abandoned vehicles, abnormal loads, waste management".
    Anyone who knows more about it than me correct me if I'm wrong, but how exactly can a drone catch a fly-poster or see if a lorry is overweight? How can it tell whether a tractor has been stolen or is just being driven on the road by the owner? Theres numerous reports of military drones messing up, and it'd be harder to keep ****-ups like the van with a pipe on it quiet here.

    Many of the applications (search and rescue, railway maintenance etc) sound sensible - like a lower cost police helicopter. I realise many of you have objections to surveillance, but in what way do you feel it will be detrimental to your civil liberties? Just asking.

    No need to panic though:
    adequate "sense and avoid" systems for drones are only a few years away
    In other words, it's a long way off. Air traffic control over our cities is hectic enough without tying these into the system. Collaborating their movements with commercial aircraft, private pilots, the military, hot air balloons and weather systems would be a total nightmare.
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    Pigs can fly afterall.
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    (Original post by domino0806)
    I don't see much difference between those three.
    Well, 2 are countries, and one is a city, for a start.
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    (Original post by Student2806)
    You're going to get one. It's called the general election :p:
    Not really. The only way to rebel in a general election is to spoil your vote, and when you do that, they just count it as 'somebody who has drawn a **** on the ballot paper', rather than treating it as a vote of no confidence in any of the parties.

    A general election is nothing but a 'formality' that we have to go through so we can call ourselves 'democratic', when it actual fact the general election is anything but democratic, and 5 years of government that follows a general election is also conducted in anything BUT a democratic manner.
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    (Original post by Aphotic Cosmos)

    + rep
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    (Original post by Phugoid)
    Not really. The only way to rebel in a general election is to spoil your vote, and when you do that, they just count it as 'somebody who has drawn a **** on the ballot paper', rather than treating it as a vote of no confidence in any of the parties.
    Or you could simply choose to vote for a party other than Labour or Conservative. If enough people keep doing this, then things will change.

    Some claim that voting for a small party is a waste of vote but it isn't because it actually helps to build confidence in that party which subsequently attracts more support.
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    I like how this kind of thing gets used by writers and paranoiacs so often and so far in advance, that by the time governments actually get round to doing it it's become so passé.
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    What was the justification for them being used?
    To stop terrorist attacks?


    They sound like a complete and utter waste of money to me, we have CCTV which is essentially set out for the same purpose. If they are that paranoid then when not set up more CCTVs? Surely that is more likely to catch people out than a whopping great balloon flying around.
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    These would be the spy drones that militants in Iraq were hacking into then using basic consumer grade set-ups? http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/hac...ory?id=9366687

    I can see a lot of people hacking these purely for the fun of it if they're brought in. Plus there would be financial incentives from criminals who'd be wanting to see what the police were seeing. It wouldn't take long til someone created a way to override control of them.
 
 
 
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