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    So, centripetal force acts towards the middle right? So why doesnt the object fly into the middle? There is no other force opposing.

    Is it Centrifugal force which opposes it? Why is it not on the syllabus. I just thought its kinda weird that you have Tension of the string (Centripetal force) going in, and nothing opposing, yet it remains in a circle.

    Thanks
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    Strictly speaking, the object is flying (=accelerating) towards the middle (centre) but it also has motion at right angles to this force, which causes it to move in a circle when you combine the two. Without this other motion, objects do fall towards the centre, it's just the usual object falling due to gravity then.
    Centripetal force is used when you have this type of motion, to describe the force needed. Without this force, the object would move in a straight line, not in a circle or any other curve.
    Centrifugal force is a dangerous concept. It's best to avoid it and avoid mentioning it completely. Generally speaking there is no need to "invent" it to solve problems of circular motion. It is an imaginary force.
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    (Original post by Stonebridge)
    Strictly speaking, the object is flying (=accelerating) towards the middle (centre) but it also has motion at right angles to this force, which causes it to move in a circle when you combine the two. Without this other motion, objects do fall towards the centre, it's just the usual object falling due to gravity then.
    Centripetal force is used when you have this type of motion, to describe the force needed. Without this force, the object would move in a straight line, not in a circle or any other curve.
    Centrifugal force is a dangerous concept. It's best to avoid it and avoid mentioning it completely. Generally speaking there is no need to "invent" it to solve problems of circular motion. It is an imaginary force.
    Mm... ok then, thanks
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    Using Newton's (I think) example, imagine a huge cannon firing a cannonball sideways (parallel to the ground of the earth). If you fire a cannonball normally it just hits the ground a distance away, but what would happen if the cannonball travelled fast enough that the ground drops away from it at the same speed that it travels along? It would just keep going round :p:.
 
 
 
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