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    (Original post by Bslforever)
    :rotfl: i can see it now.

    "Doctor, i've been having headaches all week, what should i do?"

    "hmm, looks like you need a vasectomy"
    Haha I like it.
    Putting ideas into my head for if i qualify (if i survive med school (if i get the grades to meet my offer!))
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    (Original post by rmod)
    Haha I like it.
    Putting ideas into my head for if i qualify (if i survive med school (if i get the grades to meet my offer!))
    Ahh im sure you'll be fine I probably wont though as im here rather than revising :woo:
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    (Original post by ZOMG!)
    I'm trying to deter her from the idea of medicine, not help her. Did you not read anything I posted?
    Your speaking as though I have control over what she does. :rolleyes:
    I read up to the part where you talking about the possibility of her doing a foundation agree, and that made it seem as though you were trying to help her in, and thus my post was in response to that.
    And doesn't you starting the thread suggest you believe you can actually deter her and have some aspect of control?
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    (Original post by candytreeman)
    Look after your own grades and leave her alone. Going from Cs to A*s isn't unheard of by any stretch. It is equally as common as a straight A student doing poorly.

    She has to pursue it, and will realize if she really can't do it. Her tutors will step in once she gets to the "going to a level" stage, and will tell her she can't do it.
    Yes, I plan on just 'leaving her to it' and hopefully she'll soon realise medicine probably isn't for her. But you cannot blame me for caring, she is my very good friend after all

    In regards to the bit in bold: I would usually agree with such a statement but I have to say it is unheard of when your being entered into the foundation tier.
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    hmmm... she could do a nursing diploma or something and then try GEP.
    BUT I seriously doubt that she would take that route if she is only going into it because of Daddy.

    At my school, you need an A to get into the science A level courses, and even then, some people in my class are struggling...

    If she's prepared to seriously work her arse off, then she might stand a chance, but looking at the situation, maybe she should try something else.

    She shouldn't feel as though she has to impress her family either - everyone is important to society in different ways.

    What is her best subject?
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    (Original post by 9a3iqa)
    Women shouldn't even do medicine, stick to nursing (or cooking)
    This is quite possibly the worst attempt at a joke i've ever witnessed
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    (Original post by Jeremy_Whiskers)
    This is quite possibly the worst attempt at a joke i've ever witnessed
    That's because it isn't a joke.
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    The only thing you can do is tell your "friend" your thoughts.

    At the end of the day, it's her life to live, and her mistake to make.

    You do sort of have to be good at science, because entry onto a medical programme is very highly dependent on your grades at science. It isn't, of course, the end-all and be-all, but it's certainly the easiest way to get into medicine.
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    (Original post by Revolution is my Name)
    I read up to the part where you talking about the possibility of her doing a foundation agree, and that made it seem as though you were trying to help her in, and thus my post was in response to that.
    And doesn't you starting the thread suggest you believe you can actually deter her and have some aspect of control?
    I've heard hearsay of access courses and foundation degrees and decided to ask about it, s'all (if you don't ask you never know right?)-- I'm still in high school, so I don't know a great deal about this, though I am learning a lot.

    I can only advise and inform her, not control her no. The point of this thread was to gather information/advice and pass it along to her :yep:

    But I am only a student myself. I cannot 'help' her get into medicine.
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    (Original post by Demon_AS)
    The only thing you can do is tell your "friend" your thoughts.

    At the end of the day, it's her life to live, and her mistake to make.

    You do sort of have to be good at science, because entry onto a medical programme is very highly dependent on your grades at science. It isn't, of course, the end-all and be-all, but it's certainly the easiest way to get into medicine.
    Why is she my "friend"?

    Isn't this a bit of an understatement? :p:
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    It's not really your business to tell her she can't do it unless she asks you your opinion. If she doesn't meet the entry requirements then she won't get in.
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    (Original post by ZOMG!)
    I've heard hearsay of access courses and foundation degrees and decided to ask about it, s'all (if you don't ask you never know right?)-- I'm still in high school, so I don't know a great deal about this, though I am learning a lot.

    I can only advise and inform her, not control her no. The point of this thread was to gather information/advice and pass it along to her :yep:

    But I am only a student myself. I cannot 'help' her get into medicine.
    Yes, but, if you're trying to deter her from doing Medicine, then why would you even need to research these things? Seeing as they'll actually help her get into medicine.
    And you can, in a way, "help" her get in; if you told this "dear" friend of yours that she had absolutely no chance, would that not deter her slightly and prevent her applying, which is quite an integral part of getting in, and, similarly, if you told her she had every chance and should continue, would that not make her far more likely to apply and thus have a chance of getting in?
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    (Original post by ZOMG!)
    Why is she my "friend"?

    Isn't this a bit of an understatement? :p:
    Because it is conceivable that your friend is actually you asking for advice in the third person.

    And no, it's not an understatement. To be successful as a doctor, I am told, you need to first be able to talk to and handle people. You can know everything there is to know about modern medicine, but it'll do no good whatsoever if you can't relate enough to another human being to apply that knowledge.

    Secondly, people often mature and gain insights as they grow older. Whilst your friend may not be good at science now, she might be better at it later.

    Thirdly, one of my course-mates has a degree in psychology before she transferred over to medicine. Granted, she's reasonably good at science... but it's by no means her best subject, at least not in a strict biology/chemistry/physics definition.

    I said being good at science was definitely the easiest way to get into medicine.

    But it is not the only way.
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    (Original post by Revolution is my Name)
    Yes, but, if you're trying to deter her from doing Medicine, then why would you even need to research these things? Seeing as they'll actually help her get into medicine.
    And you can, in a way, "help" her get in; if you told this "dear" friend of yours that she had absolutely no chance, would that not deter her slightly and prevent her applying, which is quite an integral part of getting in, and, similarly, if you told her she had every chance and should continue, would that not make her far more likely to apply and thus have a chance of getting in?
    Don't forget the converse. People react differently to the same things. Someone once told me I couldn't get into medicine - that only strengthened my resolve, not weaken it.

    A separate point, I grant, but relevant.
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    (Original post by Demon_AS)
    And no, it's not an understatement. To be successful as a doctor, I am told, you need to first be able to talk to and handle people. You can know everything there is to know about modern medicine, but it'll do no good whatsoever if you can't relate enough to another human being to apply that knowledge.
    I think the reverse is also true, there are plenty of people who are able to talk to and are very good at handling people, but without the academic ability to allow for good clinical judgement cannot be a useful doctor. It works both ways.
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    tell her to aim for a diff medical based course, like optmetory
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    (Original post by Single Malt)
    I think the reverse is also true, there are plenty of people who are able to talk to and are very good at handling people, but without the academic ability to allow for good clinical judgement cannot be a useful doctor. It works both ways.
    The converse will always be true.

    I never said otherwise, either.

    My point was that science, whilst being an important component in the art of medicine, is not the only important thing. One must have skill in both areas.

    In my experience, it is easier to gain scientific knowledge than it is to gain people skills. After all, it's much easier to explain anatomy than it is to explain what pain feels like, if you catch my drift.
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    You sound like a genuinely caring friend, and I would also feel the same way in your position.
    Can't say much that's already been said, but...
    Does your friend's mum and dad know that their daughter wants to go into medicine just because everybody else in their family is into it? Maybe you could talk to them about how you feel about their daughter but in a delicate way?
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    (Original post by Bslforever)
    Ahh im sure you'll be fine I probably wont though as im here rather than revising :woo:
    Ahaa biology tomorrow by any chance...?:eek3:
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    (Original post by Demon_AS)
    Because it is conceivable that your friend is actually you asking for advice in the third person.

    And no, it's not an understatement. To be successful as a doctor, I am told, you need to first be able to talk to and handle people. You can know everything there is to know about modern medicine, but it'll do no good whatsoever if you can't relate enough to another human being to apply that knowledge.

    Secondly, people often mature and gain insights as they grow older. Whilst your friend may not be good at science now, she might be better at it later.

    Thirdly, one of my course-mates has a degree in psychology before she transferred over to medicine. Granted, she's reasonably good at science... but it's by no means her best subject, at least not in a strict biology/chemistry/physics definition.

    I said being good at science was definitely the easiest way to get into medicine.

    But it is not the only way.
    Psh, I am me and my friend is my friend. If I needed help with my own problem I would just ask, it's not like you people know me anyway :rolleyes: .
 
 
 
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