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    (Original post by Revolution is my Name)
    Yes, but, if you're trying to deter her from doing Medicine, then why would you even need to research these things? Seeing as they'll actually help her get into medicine.
    And you can, in a way, "help" her get in; if you told this "dear" friend of yours that she had absolutely no chance, would that not deter her slightly and prevent her applying, which is quite an integral part of getting in, and, similarly, if you told her she had every chance and should continue, would that not make her far more likely to apply and thus have a chance of getting in?
    If I hadn't have researched into it then I wouldn't have read someone's suggestion of encouraging her to some sort of nursing degree, so I'm glad I did ask. I was mearly looking for other options, and yes, I have been trying to pursuade her to look at other courses (this is what I meant by 'deter', in retrospect, I could have made myself clearer if I had used a different word.)

    Besides, It was only a couple of days ago I heard about the foundation course, which is why I thought "well... could she possibly be able to do this?"
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    (Original post by ZOMG!)
    Yes, I plan on just 'leaving her to it' and hopefully she'll soon realise medicine probably isn't for her. But you cannot blame me for caring, she is my very good friend after all

    In regards to the bit in bold: I would usually agree with such a statement but I have to say it is unheard of when your being entered into the foundation tier.
    Well, yes, but I didn't know that :p: . The point still stands though, I know so many people who got C in a subject at GCSE, begged to get on to the A level and came out with an A. I also know straight A* students who got Cs Ds at A level. Everyone has their own anecdotes but you can guarantee it'll happen at most schools!
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    (Original post by ZOMG!)
    Psh, I am me and my friend is my friend. If I needed help with my own problem I would just ask, it's not like you people know me anyway :rolleyes: .
    Ha, relax. I meant nothing by it - my points are still valid.
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    (Original post by ZOMG!)
    Psh, I am me and my friend is my friend. If I needed help with my own problem I would just ask, it's not like you people know me anyway :rolleyes: .
    funny how you respond to the one line in the post attacking you and ignore the rest which appears to be quite helpful :rolleyes:
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    can't be bothered to check if anyone's said it already but tell her to go into nursing!
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    Why not.. try and get a decent Biomedical Degree, then come back as a graduate? Assuming she can get say.. straight Bs at A-level.
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    I often wish to be a mathematician/physicist .....and I used to have fantasies about being a pilot or architect.

    but my brain + calculus/numeracy = fail

    thus I have accepted to admire the philosophy of mathematics from a far....

    You have to accept your inadequacies - life lesson #1

    If she wants to be a doctor to help the sick tell her to go into nursing
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    A level science is going to absolutely wreck her :lol:
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    (Original post by 9a3iqa)
    Hopefully it wouldn't be a woman, otherwise I would be dead either way, probably by being ran over when she misses the parking lot
    Wow, what is your problem?
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    (Original post by Holly Hiskey)
    Wow, what is your problem?
    You don't agree? You're not being realistic missy :nah:
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    One of my friends was similar - she had her heart set on VetMed, but her grades were very average and she failed Chemistry. She's now in UCAS Extra, so I'd recommend you have a quiet, tactful word with your friend. It's tough but you'd be doing the right thing :yep:
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    yeah i knew a girl who was like that, she bare got D's and stuff and was like yeah im gonna do medicine like my sister (her sister was an A* student) and i tried dropping hints to her like 'you do know you need like 10 million A*s at GCSE and straight A's at a level blah blah' but she didn't take the hint, and now shes doing bio chem maths for a level and shes struggling, shes gonna be DISAPPOINTED when she applies for unis
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    (Original post by Panda146)
    ++ sorry my reply is kinda loooong too :o: ++

    awww~
    im hoping to do medicine too and am currently studying GCSEs and like her both my parents r doctors so its like ahhhh pressure haha... i did quite a bit of research.. :p:

    i think unis are not as concerned about GCSE grades as they are A-level but from wat yu have said i do think she will strugle too... i've heard ther is quite a big leap from gcse to a-level science....
    and im almost certain that most (if not all) unis expect their students to have atleast an A in chemistry for As.... but they would prefer them to have A-B grades in atleast 2 or 3 sciences (including maths):woo:

    maybe you could convince her to talk to a career's advisor in ur skl? so u wont seem like the "bad guy"... or like drop a few hints so she relize how difficult it is to be able to study medicine?

    alsooooo if ur skl allows students to change courses after A-level has started then i think even if she does go for the medically subjects she will relize how difficult they r by herself and maybe reconcider? D=

    ahh.. i hope i helped.... TT___TT
    Hmm good luck with your 'medically' subjects :rolleyes:

    She will fail AS levels and probably re-do her first year with critical thinking, sociology and IT
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    Haven't read the whole thread but the only way I'd go about trying to help her is to ask her - with good friendly intentions, out of interest - 'so what is it that makes you wana study medicine?' (Not, 'why you wana study it anyway! you're clearly crap' style... ) if she genuinely shows a passion for the subject and intends to do everything she can possibly do to try and get there then just leave her to it and smile like 'oh that's really great Maybe you should try ...... to get a step ahead?' But if she gets flustered and starts talking about what is expected of her then I'd go down the 'but think of yourself!' route. Perhaps then point out something that you know she has a passion for, be it singing and dancing, history and law or religious education.
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    It was something I myself agonised over for a very long time. The desire to help people, to work hard for achievement, to be challenged and to make a difference all factorised in reassuring me that my ambition was genuine. I went to do work experience, read around the subject and put so much effort into my science GCSEs that my grades were among the top in the class - something I would never have thought possible.

    Was I good enough to go and study medicine? Not in the slightest. I am positive that had the confidence, academic and extra-curricular abilities been there, it would have been the path for me. Medicine is, despite being recategorised to a degree by some, a science, and not suited to those who find difficulty in thinking scientifically. What good would it do your friend to progress on to science A Levels when the GCSEs have proven so difficult? This is an example of where one has to admit inadequacy and turn the path into a positive one. She should study what her talents lie in and, if the time seems right, return to her interest in healthcare later and see where it leads her. It's far more productive to have a career external to one's ambitions, to gain experience and to investigate other possibilities later than to commit immediately to a struggle that even she knows will bring no success or happiness.
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    (Original post by ZOMG!)
    Sorry this is long... Feel free to skim. :p:

    I have a friend who wants to do medicine but the thing is... she isn't very good at science and I suspect she is doing it for the wrong reasons aswell.

    She does additional science at GCSE and resat the entire of the last module (Chem. Phys and Bio) in order to improve her grade (I think she got Ds) and her resit results? Those same Ds but this time they brought a U along with them

    She was upset about this as she thought the exam went well... it obviously didn't. She told me she revised a lot aswell... I made no comment. She's also said she can't afford to fail science because everyone in her family does medicine and so should she. This is when I started to think she wasn't doing it for the right reasons.

    I don't think she can survive A level science, if she can't manage to scrape a B GCSE! I tried to make her think about other subjects she was good at but she won't have it, she says she isn't good at anything (she's mainly a C/D grade student, which okay because a C = a pass but for medicine? I dunno if that's going to get her anywhere :confused: ).

    I'm really not trying to bash her here. I'm just concerned, I don't want her to get her hopes up or find herself stuggling with A level science (which I'm 99% sure she will). I don't want her to waste her options!

    Is there any advice I can give her? I've heard about foundation medicine courses or something like that... Or are here grades too low for this? Shall I just leave her to it? Or continue to try and pursuade her to do something else?

    (gosh, I hope I didn't just sound like a complete *****.)
    She doesn't sound like Medicine material to me. She might be under pressure from her family to be a doctor.

    Maybe she should focus herself more in English literature, or social sciences. It's better she figures this out now rather than later once she's failed her A levels and has to take a third or fourth year to sort herself out.
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    (Original post by gildartz)
    funny how you respond to the one line in the post attacking you and ignore the rest which appears to be quite helpful :rolleyes:
    I was in a rush to watch CBB, so obviously my first instinct was to reply to the statement 'attacking' me. Besides, I did ask him a question and he did answer it, making valid points on how 'it's not the only way'. What do you want me to say to that?


    Anyway, thanks for all the replies guys
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    (Original post by Wildebeest)
    It was something I myself agonised over for a very long time. The desire to help people, to work hard for achievement, to be challenged and to make a difference all factorised in reassuring me that my ambition was genuine. I went to do work experience, read around the subject and put so much effort into my science GCSEs that my grades were among the top in the class - something I would never have thought possible.

    Was I good enough to go and study medicine? Not in the slightest. I am positive that had the confidence, academic and extra-curricular abilities been there, it would have been the path for me. Medicine is, despite being recategorised to a degree by some, a science, and not suited to those who find difficulty in thinking scientifically. What good would it do your friend to progress on to science A Levels when the GCSEs have proven so difficult? This is an example of where one has to admit inadequacy and turn the path into a positive one. She should study what her talents lie in and, if the time seems right, return to her interest in healthcare later and see where it leads her. It's far more productive to have a career external to one's ambitions, to gain experience and to investigate other possibilities later than to commit immediately to a struggle that even she knows will bring no success or happiness.
    I agree, and I was pleased to find out from her that she is planning on taking Health and Social care for one of her A level options--which is great. Although this is alongside Chem, Bio and Phys... It's a start...
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    (Original post by Panda146)
    ++ sorry my reply is kinda loooong too :o: ++

    awww~
    im hoping to do medicine too and am currently studying GCSEs and like her both my parents r doctors so its like ahhhh pressure haha... i did quite a bit of research.. :p:

    i think unis are not as concerned about GCSE grades as they are A-level but from wat yu have said i do think she will strugle too... i've heard ther is quite a big leap from gcse to a-level science....
    and im almost certain that most (if not all) unis expect their students to have atleast an A in chemistry for As.... but they would prefer them to have A-B grades in atleast 2 or 3 sciences (including maths):woo:

    maybe you could convince her to talk to a career's advisor in ur skl? so u wont seem like the "bad guy"... or like drop a few hints so she relize how difficult it is to be able to study medicine?

    alsooooo if ur skl allows students to change courses after A-level has started then i think even if she does go for the medically subjects she will relize how difficult they r by herself and maybe reconcider? D=

    ahh.. i hope i helped.... TT___TT
    Wrong.
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    3D person for the win :p:
 
 
 
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