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    I'm considering it, but don't know that many recipes of dishes that contain no dairy.

    If anyone is a vegan, how difficult do you find it? I'm currently a vegetarian by the way
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    i used to be vegan and found it quite easy, you just need to know what you can have . when ever i wanted a treat i used to snack on bourbons - no dairy or whey
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    It's really easy tbh.
    Once you get into the hang of reading ingredients on everything, you'll probably be quite shocked at the stuff you can eat! :yup:
    It's kind of annoying hearing about people saying how vegans can't eat anything, not true at all! :P:
    P.s If your struggling about dishes containing dairy, i eat mainly indian/chinese/thai food now, they don't really use milk
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    There's sometimes a free from section in most stores, try checking there.
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    Its a nightmare, some vegans won't even let meateaters cook meat in they're kitchen,
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    In most recipes you can subsitute milk/cream/cheese for soya milk/soya cream/vegan cheese and you can subsitute eggs for soft tofu. Just take recipes and adapt them for your tastes and subsitute ingredients for vegan alternatives.
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    (Original post by DMV)
    Its a nightmare, some vegans won't even let meateaters cook meat in they're kitchen,
    yeah my sisters a vegan shes fecking ridiculous sometimes.

    but from my experience its more annoying for other people than the person who actually becomes a vegan.
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    Meat to vegi is much harder then vegi to vegan. Like others have said it's wierdly easy , for eating out thai and indian are great, italian places should have something (if they didn't I would have two starters.) Use more herbs and spices etc for more flavour ie instead of cheese.

    I don't see why it should effect someone eles :s
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    co op jam OR custard doughnuts, apple and cherry pie, strusels, various crumble from frozen sections or homemade
    m&s pepporocino foccacia
    lots of supermarket biscuits
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    (Original post by lizfairy)
    co op jam OR custard doughnuts, apple and cherry pie, strusels, various crumble from frozen sections or homemade
    m&s pepporocino foccacia
    lots of supermarket biscuits
    I want to turn vegan now and just live on biscuits :sogood:
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    ..yep and Hob Nobs, ginger snaps, co-op fruit shortcakes, bourbon creams, Lidl chocolate digestives.. there's plenty of biscuits. In terms of "normal food" though, it's actually really easy. There's so much, you only have to change things from veggie a tiny bit like leave out the cheese or replace it with vegan cheese.
    You can still have pretty much everything: curries, pasta, burgers, rice, sausages, noodles, tofu, stir-frys, pizza (no cheese/vegan cheese), cottage pie, lasagne, flapjacks, beans, lentils, soup, sandwiches/bagettes etc.
    The internet is your friend. There's sooo many vegan recipe blogs etc for inspiration, even ones specially dedicated to cookies and cakes! It's actually overwhelming. I prefer just experimenting!
    Try it for a week and see what you think, that's what I did and I found it quite fun so a few weeks later turned vegan properly. Good luck!
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    Yep like LinzyLoo said... Internet

    www.vegweb.com
    also some of the blogs listed in the links section of my own blog in my sig
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    (Original post by DMV)
    Its a nightmare, some vegans won't even let meateaters cook meat in they're kitchen,

    would you let me cook people in your kitchen?
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    Holland & Barratt have a ton of vegan fake meats...I'm veggie mesen, but they have a huge selection.
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    I've experimented with it before and didn't have too many problems - but I do think it's something you have to be really committed to in order to maintain!

    As far as cooking/buying food for yourself goes - it's easy. Lots more 'normal' foods are vegan than you probably realise, and dairy/meat substitutes are fairly easy to get your hands on in supermarkets if that's your thing. Obviously there's much more variety to be had in health food shops etc. but it is possible to be vegan and still shop in solely sainsbury's.

    The hardest thing I found was a) checking the labels of everything (and indeed learning all the different names for animal derived ingredients) and b) eating out. However, you learn fairly quickly what common snacks are/aren't vegan, and an increasing amount of restaurants etc. are offering vegan options. Even if they don't and you end up stranded in a real old pub or something, there's always chips and salad. Obviously not great to do every day - but it won't hurt once in a while if there's nothing else on the menu! I do know that places like Pizza Express can adapt their pizzas and stuff to make them vegan though, so a lot of places are actually very good. Actual vegan meals/recipes/cakes are REALLY yummy too, so that's always a bonus.

    The only reason I gave it up (I'm now just a vegetarian) was because I was never that morally motivated in the first place. Obviously I do care about animal welfare etc. but I felt like a hypocrite for still using non-vegan shampoo etc. (something which is avoidable, if you want it to be) and it was more of a personal choice due to me just not liking meat and milk that much! But by all means try it out - give it a go and let us know how you get on. It's not for everyone, but it works out for lots of people.
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    I was allergic to milk so was mainly vegan for about 5 years, then was just dairy free for the next 5, now I eat everything.

    It all comes down to packet checking. Things to look out for are lactose, whey powder, milk powder.. I remember being surprised at how many things had something in that I couldn't eat, like certain varieties of walkers crisps and some dark chocolates. There is probably a section on this on decent vegan websites, so look out. Snacking was the only thing there were any "troubles" with, anything you make from scratch is easy enough to make sure is vegan. Curries and stews are really good without the meat, I found substitutes to dairy okay but then I didn't know any different at the time. I'd recommend sweetened soya milk as an alternative to things like milkshake, carob to chocolate, vegan spread to butter/margarine.. but I'd steer clear of vegan cheese and I wasn't too fond of the cream either.

    Good luck OP!
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    some vegan food blogs for the OP:

    http://www.theppk.com/recipes/

    http://theveganronin.blogspot.com/

    http://veganmenu.blogspot.com/

    there's plenty more out there, you'll be spoilt for choice if you start searching
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    (Original post by splunket)
    would you let me cook people in your kitchen?
    I know here isn't the place for a debate, but you can't compare cannabolism to cooking up some bacon for example.
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    (Original post by Double Agent)
    I know here isn't the place for a debate, but you can't compare cannabolism to cooking up some bacon for example.
    Why not? It's still cooking a once living being, the only difference being one is socially acceptable and bacon does not come from your own species. I would understand people thinking those two difference don't mean much.
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    (Original post by Double Agent)
    I know here isn't the place for a debate, but you can't compare cannabolism to cooking up some bacon for example.
    who said anything about eating it?

    Seriously though, I believe the student room is as a good place for reasonable debate as any other. The comparison was a little flippant perhaps, although I'd like to think it got the point across. Of course there are more complex issues involved when mentioning cannibalism, not least the fact that it is highly illegal. I was merely trying to point out the ethical disposition of most vegans. To a lot of them, and myself, whether it be legal or not, the act of cooking and eating real flesh is something quite perverse, just as many recognise it is so with human flesh. Perhaps it would have been more appropriate to use a pet as an example. After all, why is it ok to eat a pet pig but not a pet cat?
 
 
 
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