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    (Original post by theconservativeblog.co.uk)
    Nigel Farage’s attack on the burqa was a long time coming. The burqa is indeed a symbol of separation and intimidation and it doesn’t have any space in contemporary British society.

    However, now I must part company with Mr Farage.

    His reasoning for why the Burqa should be banned was nothing but amateurish and quite pathetic. “You wouldn’t be allowed to go in a bank with a motorcycle helmet on” he reminds us, but what the hell does that have to do with the burqa? The motorcycle helmet is there for safety in transport and the burqa is a so-called ‘religious statement’. People in Britain deserve a full and frank reason for why this piece of Saudi-backed colonialism must never become a part of today’s mainstream multicultural society.

    Firstly, the burqa is not Islamic. It is not written in the Quran that a woman must cover her face, but merely she must dress modestly. In fact, the Quran doesn’t give the commandment that all women should dress modestly, this is directed at the Prophet Mohammed’s wives, where most Islamic scholars have picked up to apply to all women. There is no mention of the burqa in the hadith or indeed in Sharia law. And finally, there is no word, or anything similar, to the description of the burqa in any of the recognised Islamic texts (including the Bible and Torah).

    So, where did this hideous piece of attire come from? The answer lies in the Middle East, well, Saudi Arabia to be precise. As Western Europe was adopting the ideas of the nation-state, free speech and representative democracy, in the Islamic World they searched for an answer within themselves. Hence, the birth of Wahabi Islam.

    Wahabi Islam is quite a complex topic to discuss, however I shall try to simplify the discussion. Wahabism is a puritan and literal reading of the Quran, those who follow this sect of Islam take all their inspiration and guidance from the holy book. Thus, this is why Wahabi’s stress that the Quran is the final ‘word of god’ and imitate the Prophet to the point of (supposed) appearance, they see no better and nothing man-made can compare to its supposed brilliance and magnificence.

    So, you have a holy book. Said to be the final word of god and you are reminded anything else is heretic and threatening to your faith. All you need now is a state-backer, of which there are many, but Saudi Arabia takes the lead in backing Wahabi Islam.

    The burqa was born in Saudi hands as a way to construct their vision of an ‘Islamic state’. Before this, the burqa was relatively unknown to the Islamic world. Its usage may had been recorded in cults and tiny pockets of the Muslim community world-wide, but it was with Saudi influence and money this piece of clothing became the mainstream in Wahabi society. This is nothing more than Saudi-backed colonialism of their version of Islam.

    The burqa, thankfully, has received wide-spread criticism from within the Islamic world. Indeed, just last year the top cleric of Egypt banned the burqa in schools. Quoting “merely a custom that dates back to tribal, nomadic societies living in the Arabian desert before Islam began”. Long before the poisonous seeds of the Egyptian Islamic Brotherhood set in, Egypt (as well as India, China, Indonesia and Turkey) were cultural centres of the Islamic faith.

    Wherever there is Saudi backing, there is the burqa. Take the example of Afghanistan and Yemen where Saudi financed Islamo-fascists have reigned their terror in the respective countries. Both states have brought into Wahabi Islam and both are now incubators of terror and now both have widespread usage of the burqa.

    In the UK, the burqa has become the topic of discussion in the media. I am against the banning of this garment. To ban it, would be more of a PR-failure than it would be effective. I suggest making the usage of it more difficult. The arrogant irony of the burqa is that is only used in the public sphere: fine, let it be used in the public sphere. I recommend a law where if anyone wishes to go into a public place, say a coffee shop, a shopping centre or a library then they your face must be shown. Problem solved.

    Of course, don’t expect much to be done yet. Labour is still in bed and the Islamic fundamentalism which take the privileged position of being on top. Hopefully, when a Conservative government replaces this group of lefty relativists, then perhaps, just perhaps, we might reign in the threat of Islamic fundamentalism and colonialism.
    I think the author is spot-on. Here is a link to the article.

    What do you guys think?
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    There are some interesting points in the article. I don't necessarily agree with all or any of them, and the writer makes some assumptions despite actually appearing to know at least something about Islam.

    Yes, the burqa is a tribal garment (Bedouin I expect) and I think it would be interesting to find out where the pressure to wear them in 'Wahhabi' Islam came from originally - it certainly wasn't from Muhammad Ibn Abd al-Wahhab, whose teachings were in fact rather moderate where women were concerned when compared to the modern version of Wahhabism. However, I find the notion that the burqa is a form of Saudi colonialism more than a little risible.

    The government of Saudi Arabia is, as implied by the name, dominated entirely by the House of Saud. The Saud family is more interested in preserving its power over a resentful population than exporting its own brand of Islam. They are a bunch of dynasts and they are hated in their own country - there is no Saudi policy of cultural imperialism.

    I do agree that so-called Islamofascism seems to originate from within Saudi Arabia, but it comes mainly from the disaffected subjects of Abd al-Aziz who are eager to escape from absolutist rule and set up their own communities elsewhere (with the implications for 'cultural export' that this carries), or to lash out at the regime. One of the ways in which they do this is to attack the house of Saud's biggest supporters, the US and UK (thanks to oil). I am sure that they see themselves as fighting for freedom as much as we see them as the enemies of freedom.

    The point is, however, that the export of the burqa to other countries is more to do with the flight of people from Saudi Arabia who have the burqa as part of their culture.
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    Pure BS spouted by western ignorant homosexual lovers, who don't know a thing about Islam.

    They claimed India and China were "cultural centres" of "Islam". Need I say more?
 
 
 
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