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    Hi everyone!

    I applied to the MFE program at Oxford (second round).I saw some of the older threads from a few years back where people were really bashing this program for being too quant etc......but I feel its a good fit for me and would love the opportunity to study there.

    Interesting in knowing backgrounds/interview preparations etc of other applicants to this program....especially from students who applied in the first round......any offer holders???

    Cheers
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    no other MFE applicants out there?????
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    heard half of their students are americans...
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    haha....oh, that would explain why not many people on this forum. I saw a few old discussions on this.
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    I don't think a lot of british students will be applying to this considering that they make GMAT compulsory.
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    (Original post by verticalforce)
    I don't think a lot of british students will be applying to this considering that they make GMAT compulsory.
    I didn't know there was such aversion to the GMAT in the UK.....interesting.

    The MSc in Finance & Eco at LSE howeverrequires a GRE/GMAT score.
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    The programme is only 10% american, it is mainly oriental (60%+!).

    I was one of the people bashing this programme mainly because it is not advertised for what it is. It is NOT a replacement for an MSc Finance. Many of the students on this course were not happy with it because (as I said before) it is too theoretical and Oxford drastically understates the level of maths required.
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    (Original post by awm55)
    The programme is only 10% american, it is mainly oriental (60%+!).

    I was one of the people bashing this programme mainly because it is not advertised for what it is. It is NOT a replacement for an MSc Finance. Many of the students on this course were not happy with it because (as I said before) it is too theoretical and Oxford drastically understates the level of maths required.
    are you studying it now?

    and how it compares to cambridge mphil?

    isn't replacement because focuses on econometrics?
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    (Original post by stu_m_l)
    are you studying it now?

    and how it compares to cambridge mphil?

    isn't replacement because focuses on econometrics?
    I went to the open day and spoke to people currently on the course. They were brutally honest about it, and the feedback was not great tbh. It is not advertised for what it is.
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    I think Oxford MFE is a hybrid of general finance and financial engineering masters so I'm not surprised if it's highly quantitative.

    I don't know why Oxford keeps saying that this course is practical in nature when it isn't - if you dig deeper you'll find that you can continue onto the DPhil upon completion of MFE. (probably conditional on distinction or something)

    @stu: I heard for Cam as long as you do not opt for financial engineering stream or choose modules outside JBS, the maths are quite manageable for non quants.
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    (Original post by verticalforce)
    I think Oxford MFE is a hybrid of general finance and financial engineering masters so I'm not surprised if it's highly quantitative.

    I don't know why Oxford keeps saying that this course is practical in nature when it isn't - if you dig deeper you'll find that you can continue onto the DPhil upon completion of MFE. (probably conditional on distinction or something)

    @stu: I heard for Cam as long as you do not opt for financial engineering stream or choose modules outside JBS, the maths are quite manageable for non quants.
    it is neither of those. it is not quantitative enough for financial engineering and not practical enough for general finance. because everything is underpinned with economics many topics are abstract and not very applicable (at least what I have been told).
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    (Original post by awm55)
    it is neither of those. it is not quantitative enough for financial engineering and not practical enough for general finance. because everything is underpinned with economics many topics are abstract and not very applicable (at least what I have been told).
    thats very interesting....i never looked at the program like that. What you said about it being right b/w a pure financial engineering program and a pure finance program seems really accurate. However, is it hard to imagine the program wouldn't prepare someone for a career in asset management or banking ? (not for a quant based role, but a that of an analyst or associate)
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    (Original post by arctic_toon)
    thats very interesting....i never looked at the program like that. What you said about it being right b/w a pure financial engineering program and a pure finance program seems really accurate. However, is it hard to imagine the program wouldn't prepare someone for a career in asset management or banking ? (not for a quant based role, but a that of an analyst or associate)
    it certainly would, but the course is more academic than many other courses similar to it evidenced by there being a direct entry PhD option post MFE.
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    (Original post by awm55)
    it is neither of those. it is not quantitative enough for financial engineering and not practical enough for general finance. because everything is underpinned with economics many topics are abstract and not very applicable (at least what I have been told).
    I disagree. These courses are suppose to be a signal of your academic ability (with focus on finance). Of course you won't pay 27k to learn to do a DCF on excel (no rocket science). If you know the theoretical basis of valuation - which these courses teach- you will have no problem with the practical side.Just one example though The same goes for the financial engineering side - you are free to choose the harder *mathsy* modules, which will definitely enhance your quant skill-set.

    The Finance courses at Oxbridge might not give you an exhaustive overview of the knowledge required to do you job, but it will definitely get you *loads* of interviews and needless to say, once you reach that stage all that matters is your interview performace.

    So rubishing these programmes without having first hand knowledge about them is not a very good idea.

    Though I am doing the Cambridge MPhil Finance, but I know people who do are doing MFE- they are also well sorted in terms of jobs!
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    (Original post by henrykravis)
    I disagree. These courses are suppose to be a signal of your academic ability (with focus on finance). Of course you won't pay 27k to learn to do a DCF on excel (no rocket science). If you know the theoretical basis of valuation - which these courses teach- you will have no problem with the practical side.Just one example though The same goes for the financial engineering side - you are free to choose the harder *mathsy* modules, which will definitely enhance your quant skill-set.

    The Finance courses at Oxbridge might not give you an exhaustive overview of the knowledge required to do you job, but it will definitely get you *loads* of interviews and needless to say, once you reach that stage all that matters is your interview performace.

    So rubishing these programmes without having first hand knowledge about them is not a very good idea.

    Though I am doing the Cambridge MPhil Finance, but I know people who do are doing MFE- they are also well sorted in terms of jobs!
    Absolutely agree with Kravis.

    I was accepted for the 2009 entry but I had deferred it until this coming september so I will be part of the 2011 class. I specifically chose the program because of 1) the brand name and 2) the courses. There are a number of courses which I find extremely interesting and it played an important role in my decision.

    On awm's view that the MFE is not quant enough for FE jobs and not practical enough for real jobs - I disagree because at least for me, it's not how I look at it. I am not there to acquire quant skills nor am I there to acquire practical skills. I think it is a very unique program with interesting courses, and the emphasis placed on the underlying financial economics vs. strictly financial or just economics has tremendous appeal to me because I am very interested in the areas of global macro trends and restructuring type opportunities, and I think in that respect, this is very fitting for me.

    More on the practical aspect - as an Associate in private equity, I can tell you from experience that classroom knowledge (typically) can't be applied straight to the real world. However, the underlying theory is still crucial and the good students will pick up the important fundamentals from class - you will learn all the other stuff on the job. And to that point, I personally don't have any expectation that the profs will teach material that is very practical, because that's not their job and its why they're in academia (that's not to say you will not get any profs who appreciate industry considerations for sure); again, those skill sets are learned on the job. But what I do expect is to learn and acquire skills, concepts and knowledge that closely matches what I am interested in learning. Taking that knowledge to the next level, using it your own way and applying it is your job - not theirs.
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    Hello, do I stand any chance as a going-to-be third year Aerospace Engineering student with a very strong mathematical background? Also my computational skills are quite good.

    Thanks
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    It's a very academic course, but brilliant for prospects in AM/IB. I take it you already have experience in these areas?
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    (Original post by [email protected])
    It's a very academic course, but brilliant for prospects in AM/IB. I take it you already have experience in these areas?
    No, actually I don't have any practical experience, expect book about Financial Engineering I have been reading this summer.

    The thing is, fas for my postgraduate studies, I want to continue with Aerospace, but I am also quite interested in Finance/Economics; so I was considering to applying for both.

    What do you think?
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    Actually, the course I would like to get into would be MSc in Financial engineering.
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    (Original post by federvo.mala)
    No, actually I don't have any practical experience, expect book about Financial Engineering I have been reading this summer.

    The thing is, fas for my postgraduate studies, I want to continue with Aerospace, but I am also quite interested in Finance/Economics; so I was considering to applying for both.

    What do you think?
    I suggest you ATLEAST take a summer internship at the bare minimum BEFORE commencing study on a programme like the MFE.

    I'm suprised they would let you in with 0 experience since it is a gamble on their employment record post qualification as far as they're concerned.
 
 
 
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