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Games Art at Teesside (3D portfolio question) watch

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    I wasn't entirely sure which category I should place this in, so apologies if this is in the wrong place.

    I've been considering doing Games Art at Teesside for quite a while now. Of course, I'm still looking at other unis but I'm most interested in Teesside. I've heard that it's very good, but I'm worried that since there is a huge focus on 3D modelling they will be expecting a large amount of ability and knowledge on the subject already.

    I've never been taught it and so 3ds Max is another world for me (since my strengths are drawing and Photoshop). I'm planning on learning some basics and trying to expand on that asap, but I don't really know what quantity and quality of 3D work they're expecting, or indeed, any university with a similar qualification is expecting.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks =]

    -Anna
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    Is this an undergraduate degree? I'd guess that they don't require previous 3D experience because most people won't have had much chance to do it. Computer science courses don't expect students to have already done programming, and that's far more accessible than 3D modelling.

    I'd concentrate on somehow demonstrating you understand the technical side of things to some extent as well as being artistic. If you're already pretty good with Photoshop, you probably have a reasonable grasp of it. Maybe you could do a bit of research into 3D modelling and how stuff goes from Max or Maya and into a game. Look up things like normal maps, specular maps, LODs, and other technical aspects of it. I wouldn't worry too much about getting onto the course, I'd be more concerned about getting a job afterwards. These degrees aren't a ticket into a job. I've heard your degree isn't too important for game art jobs, your portfolio is much more important. So you should look at the degree as a way to learn how to make good artwork, and look at the coursework as something to show employers rather than something you need to do to pass a degree.
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    Haha, yeah, I understand that the qualification won't do much if you haven't got the ability or portfolio there. I'm just using this degree as a way of boosting my portfolio and learning how to do a lot of stuff that I wouldn't have a clue about otherwise (i.e. 3D work).

    And yes, it is an undergraduate degree. I suppose it makes sense that not a lot of people through A-Levels haven't had a chance to do any 3D work. The programs are very daunting. I'll just try to introduce myself to the stuff and see if anything good comes of it.
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    I also applied for the Teesside games art course. I had my interview a few weeks ago and recently got a conditional offer! Universities offering Games Art and 3D Digital Animation courses do not expect you to have any prior knowledge of the 3D applications such as 3Ds Max or Maya. You will however spend a lot of time being taught and using this software throughout each year of the course. In fact, I may go as far to say such courses are focused around 3D software entirely. They are however not software training courses, they teach you the principles and give you the knowledge to get started then you have to do a lot of independent learning with the software.

    These courses generally expect applicants to want to be 3d modellers or animators in the industry. 2D Digital Graphic artists and concept artists would generally be expected to take either a fine art or graphic design degree.

    This course is perfect for an individual determined to get into the games industry as a modeler or animator. Someone who is competent with life drawing will fair well because it shows understanding of the same principles which are used for modeling and good observational skills. Graphic design work shows your creative nature and that you have such an interest to do art related activities as extra curricular work.

    Hope that helps, might be seeing you in September!
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    Have you read ANY reviews about Tesside?

    Do not ask me how it made 'University of the year' but it must be a fluke!
    I went there for an interview not long ago and it was god awful! The streets looked horrible on the way there and thats even before I got there, my interview just went waaaaaaaaay too quickly and I thought I had done really bad, I mean the guy didn't even look interested and on the way home all I did was think about how badly it went. Sure they all the felicities etc but after reading some reviews that night I declined straight away.

    Teesside is the number one WORST place to live in England, the crime rate is through the roof, I've read reviews about students being robbed so many times they can't remember, cars constantly stolen, you can't even walk around the town center without feeling scared TRUST ME! It's a really rough place to live and I the University is just the same, the teaching is poor and they I've heard (from previous student reviews) that they some of them don't know how to work some of the equipment or even let you use it.

    It's up to you but I am staying well away.

    Here some reviews:
    http://www.ciao.co.uk/Reviews/Teeside_University__22858

    Accommodation is god awful to
    http://www.ciao.co.uk/Teeside_Univer...Review_5508136

    But this is my favorite one
    http://www.ciao.co.uk/Teeside_Univer...Review_5528741
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    (Original post by SexuallySexySex)
    Have you read ANY reviews about Tesside?

    Do not ask me how it made 'University of the year' but it must be a fluke!
    I went there for an interview not long ago and it was god awful! The streets looked horrible on the way there and thats even before I got there, my interview just went waaaaaaaaay too quickly and I thought I had done really bad, I mean the guy didn't even look interested and on the way home all I did was think about how badly it went. Sure they all the felicities etc but after reading some reviews that night I declined straight away.

    Teesside is the number one WORST place to live in England, the crime rate is through the roof, I've read reviews about students being robbed so many times they can't remember, cars constantly stolen, you can't even walk around the town center without feeling scared TRUST ME! It's a really rough place to live and I the University is just the same, the teaching is poor and they I've heard (from previous student reviews) that they some of them don't know how to work some of the equipment or even let you use it.

    It's up to you but I am staying well away.

    Here some reviews:
    http://www.ciao.co.uk/Reviews/Teeside_University__22858

    Accommodation is god awful to
    http://www.ciao.co.uk/Teeside_Univer...Review_5508136

    But this is my favorite one
    http://www.ciao.co.uk/Teeside_Univer...Review_5528741
    I've got a few points I disagree with on the last one. Not that I know anything about Teesside, but there's some that are the same on good "computing" courses, and for good reason.

    In several modules it would be quite easily not to touch a computer (save for a word processor) in any shape or form.
    There's lots of useful stuff for a computer science course that doesn't involve using a computer. Ultimately it's about problem solving, and there's lots of useful theory to help you do that.

    instead of upgrading software or teachers who know and have the ability to teach new technologies such as .NET. Instead they prefer to keep these modules for the masters courses or for the people who perhaps scrape together the money for another year's worth of hellish studies.
    Decent CS courses shouldn't focus on specific technologies, because they come and go all the time. Plus there's so many of them, you're pretty useless if you are only prepared to use the specific ones you've learnt about.

    Don't get me wrong, it still sounds rubbish going by that review. But those points were a little unfair, or were missing details.
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    have you done a search of "teesside" on this thread.here I am going to hertfordshire for Games art in Sept as I turned down teesside and Bournemouth CV&A
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    Decent CS courses shouldn't focus on specific technologies, because they come and go all the time. Plus there's so many of them, you're pretty useless if you are only prepared to use the specific ones you've learnt about.
    Agreed. But graphics is not CS. With a vocational course like this, you would expect that the course prepare you for the current market.

    Anyway, OP, do you know if there is much of a theoretical base? Geometry, graphics programming etc.? Or is it more just an art course - drawing, modelling, industrial processes?

    Try Blender. It's an excellent (and free) piece of software, recommended by tonnes of modellers and animators, and there are loads of high-quality tutorials on the site and around the Internet. I am planning on learning 3D modelling over the summer, as it is the one part of games development that I still can't do at all. I'll be working in Blender on recommendation.
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    (Original post by Planto)
    Agreed. But graphics is not CS. With a vocational course like this, you would expect that the course prepare you for the current market.
    That comment was aimed at that review site someone posted, which was about their computing course, which I assume is meant to be like computer science. But I suppose it could be intended to be a more vocational course.
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    I've heard good and bad things about Teesside, more of which are good. I know someone who works for a top games developer in the UK who studied 3D animation at Teesside. He enjoyed the course and the degree helped him get his job. I was impressed by the universities facilities and staff despite the area being a bit shabby. The individual that I know who went to Teesside said that "you only get out of it what you put in to it". By this he means it requires a lot of self learning, time and dedication which is to be expected.

    Now, this brings me to a point which can be made about the people who say that the University is bad. Firstly, the course is promoted as 'Games Art'. This is likely to attract people who, on a whim decide that they want to develop computer games because it sounds fun and because they play a bit of Call of Duty. These people have no prior knowledge of the procedure and don't understand the time it takes to build a solid skill set and portfolio required to enter the industry. It's expected that if they sign onto such a course with little dedication and motivation they will struggle since it's not a walk in the park to learn these skills. They find that their lecturers won't hold their hands and do the work for them so they take it out on the course/university and **** it off online.

    When I went to my interview at Hertfordshire the interviewer asked me where else I applied and I responded with Teesside. He said that Teesside is great for this subject and in his opinion Hertfordshire and Teesside were the top two in the UK. I would have chosen Hertfordshire but I wasn't comfortable with the prospect of living on a campus for the next 3 years and preferred the freedom that was offered with Teesside.

    Do not expect for lecturers to teach you everything, help you with everything and always be there for you. Especially with a course like this where the software is so immense, it would take up all of their time. Be prepared for a lot of self learning, putting in a lot of your own free time and a lot of all nighters working on projects and rendering for deadlines. If you truly want to get into this industry this won't be a problem as it will already be or will become a strong passion that you really enjoy doing.
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    Hi Anna, hope you get this because i think i have the answer with primary research.
    I finished a 2 year games design course at wakefield collage and now on my level 3 foundation art and design at wakefield collage and though out games design i was pushed towards teeside because the two generally are very active with heloing eachother, i have been exposed to all the courses and offers Teeside has to offer and Games art is what i am going for this year (so if you do in fact choose to join and read this look out for a Darian Smith ) and it is constantly embedded mentioned no prior experience with any 3D software is required you will have tutorials on it so not to worry, it is however very benaficial for you to have some level of knowledge the more the merrier, my interview is actually torrow hance the researching Teeside course, my friend had it previously and he is very experienced with the 3D software the use he quotes the interviewer "Well you know everything we teach on Autodesk, just play with maya till you join, your already a-head you may as well get further a-head."

    Hope this helped i understand it was a little rambley but ... meh Quick notes:
    Autodesk 3Ds max - 3D software (Free to students (VERY powerful program requires a good computer to run)
    Autodesk maya - 3D character modeling (Very difficult start with 3Ds

    Just little things you can quickly research to have that head start hope this helps ^^
 
 
 
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