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    'A spokesman for the Department for Children, Schools and Families said: "These are pretty cheap and insulting comments. It's easy to make sweeping, rhetorical flourishes about so-called 'hard' and 'soft' subjects – but it is wrong to ignore the hard work of tens of thousands of teachers and pupils and misrepresent the state of education in this country."'


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    how the **** can people expect you to make one of the most important decisions in your life at 16? after 16, i went from wanting to do medicine to actuary science to physics then to engineering. alls i did was take the most generic subjects; even now i'm doing a (sort of) general engineering degree because i don't know what i want to do in the future, and i've still got a year to think about that.
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    (Original post by fidel69)
    no offence mate, but i think if you're 15,16.. you're intelligent enough to go research your future, we all have careers sessions at school from a young age and also the internet has so much information... i think the blame is more on lazy students
    I don't think it's fair that major life choices be determined by academic choices you make at age 16. BELIEVE ME, I hate stupid/lazy people, but this is different.

    Teachers and schools are in a position of authority, and as such shouldn't mislead students into thinking that they can take whatever subject they want at GCSE/A Level without consequences.
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    (Original post by paddy)
    I don't think it's fair that major life choices be determined by academic choices you make at age 16. BELIEVE ME, I hate stupid/lazy people, but this is different.

    Teachers and schools are in a position of authority, and as such shouldn't mislead students into thinking that they can take whatever subject they want at GCSE/A Level without consequences.
    If someone doesn't know what career they want (ie everyone) how can a teacher help either way?

    I don't think they do. If someone says they want to do medicine then a school would advise againt history, english lang and lit and economics.

    Or don't you think they would?
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    (Original post by Pheonixx)
    By the time a kid is 16 they should be able to plan their future; especially if they want to go to uni.
    When I was in school (god I feel old saying this but it was 5 years ago now) no one knew what they wanted to do at 16. Everyone knew where they wanted to go at 18 but lots of people had dreamy ambitions at 16 but there was no help or idea on how to get there. Out of my year the majority are married with kids or at uni but no one had a clue what to do with their future at that age. Heck it's too soon to decide or where to go after their GCSEs.
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    I went to a school where we weren't really expected to go to university. We were never given any information about the types of A levels to choose, and the fact that some are more highly regarded than others, because it was considered an achievement to leave there with a few C grades at GCSE. Had I not started posting on here, I'd never have known that degrees in subjects like Media Studies, etc., were looked down on.
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    I can't help but feel that though it is important to have some people study the 'softer subjects', there are way too many people taking them in comparison to the number of jobs available in those fields. It is the responsibility of the government and of the schools to make sure their pupils know this. I also think that the government is stressing too much the importance of having as many students as possible go to uni. Don't get me wrong, I know it's important, but I'm talking about those who are much less academically able who are told that going to university will help them get a job, so they go, study a 'softer' subject and are ultimately no better off than before because they can't get a job because their subject is either looked down upon by employers or there aren't enough jobs in that field. I know that people have other reasons for going to uni but I just think people should be made more aware of the difficulties some graduates have of getting jobs after having studied soft subjects before they decide what they want to study at A level and beyond.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    If someone doesn't know what career they want (ie everyone) how can a teacher help either way?

    I don't think they do. If someone says they want to do medicine then a school would advise againt history, english lang and lit and economics.

    Or don't you think they would?
    It entirely depends on the school.

    Anyway I know that I mentioned to my teachers what I was interested in, and was never advised to take appropriate subjects because they didn't think I needed them.

    Whatever, people should just do the IB instead of A Levels.
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    (Original post by leeming)
    Not sure if any one has pointed it out yet, but i agree with the statement of public schools encouraging 'soft' subjects, but not because people are poor/rich.. but because the government give schools money if they have xx% pass rates. Private schools dont need to care about this government incentive as they have other sources of money
    I totally agree. I think there's too much focus on getting as many people as possible to pass and get as many qualifications as possible (even if some of them are worthless) and not enough focus on getting everyone to achieve the best they can.
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    (Original post by paddy)
    Whatever, people should just do the IB instead of A Levels.
    And spend a second longer doing languages? I thinky not.
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    (Original post by abbey_rock4life)
    'A spokesman for the Department for Children, Schools and Families said: "These are pretty cheap and insulting comments. It's easy to make sweeping, rhetorical flourishes about so-called 'hard' and 'soft' subjects – but it is wrong to ignore the hard work of tens of thousands of teachers and pupils and misrepresent the state of education in this country."'


    This.
    It is easy to make cheap platitudinous statements defending the government's abysmal record in education (remember its slogan Education, education, education) but it is wrong to ignore the sensible argument that schools and universities are incentivised into giving pupils poor advice and to provide meaningless courses.

    The hard work of the pupils and teachers is irrelevant if it is directed (by the government) toward qualifications that mean so little and give them and the country so little benefit.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    And spend a second longer doing languages? I thinky not.
    This is why Europe laughs at us, and rightly so.

    If I was in charge of education I would make a foreign language compulsory for GCSE (like it used to be:rolleyes:) and possibly even A Level.
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    (Original post by Phalanges)
    I particularly agree with the comments in that article from the shadow education secretary as to why media studies has suddenly become popular. The state schools have to be more concerned now about hitting targets than actually providing a good education, and as such the whole thing falls down.
    Yes, this.
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    (Original post by oliver5084)
    What a load of ****...

    How can you blame other people for your subject choices...

    And if there not allowed to study 'hard' subjects by there school its probably for the best as they are not academically able enough to be successful on those courses...

    This is just another example of people being jealous of successful students...... ! :mad:
    Actually you'd be surprised my sister was discouraged from her initial choices of essay based subjects such as english Lang lit, History and she was also told not to do a sciencne based subject simply because they thought she would not be able to handle the work load becuase she didnt achieve enough A*'s compared to the other students who had enrolled - they all had like 10 a*'s while my sister had only 5a*'s and then rest A's.
    She was told she should reconsider and do media studies, film studies, it and business and after a few meetings and complaints she managed to stick to her first choices.
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    (Original post by abbey_rock4life)
    'A spokesman for the Department for Children, Schools and Families said: "These are pretty cheap and insulting comments. It's easy to make sweeping, rhetorical flourishes about so-called 'hard' and 'soft' subjects – but it is wrong to ignore the hard work of tens of thousands of teachers and pupils and misrepresent the state of education in this country."'


    This.
    No not that, you definitely can't ignore hard work if that hard work is toward the wrong aim, and it in no way misrepresents the state of education in this country.
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    a student going to a state school doesn't make them poor.. I know plenty of people who take 'soft' subjects yet go to a private school and likewise many students who study hard subjects that may be considered 'poor'. As someone mentioned, you can't blame other people for your subject choices, people excel in different areas and an A level in media studies is going to be a lot more useful to you if you want to go into PR or media than an A level in almost an 'hard' subject.

    I'm not being biased though because my four subjects are probably considered 'hard'.
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    (Original post by paddy)
    This is why Europe laughs at us, and rightly so.

    If I was in charge of education I would make a foreign language compulsory for GCSE (like it used to be:rolleyes:) and possibly even A Level.
    And what use is a second language to me?

    What benefit would a C grade Alevel be to me?

    English would have been more useful, or even economics than any further foreign language training. heck, latin would have been more useful than a 'living language'.
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    (Original post by Harry-AA)
    an A level in media studies is going to be a lot more useful to you if you want to go into PR or media than an A level in almost an 'hard' subject.
    No it isn't. Journalists and PR professionals (as opposed to administrative workers) are far more likely to have taken academic subjects than the likes of media studies.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    And what use is a second language to me?

    What benefit would a C grade Alevel be to me?

    English would have been more useful, or even economics than any further foreign language training. heck, latin would have been more useful than a 'living language'.
    As someone who made the mistake of taking Latin at A Level, I can safely say that no it really wouldn't :no:
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    (Original post by paddy)
    As someone who made the mistake of taking Latin at A Level, I can safely say that no it really wouldn't :no:
    I know it wouldn't, but more useful than say french, which I will never need.

    How does it benefit socieity to spend so much money on trying to forcefully train people in languages they won't use?
 
 
 
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