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    When I was 15/16 I sort of felt like you "were" your subjects if you get what I mean, but now I know studying sciences doesn't make you a nerd and studying art doesn't make you quirky. Hence why I like the IB system, you can study your interests but you have to do something useful as well.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    How do you measure that?
    I don't know but things like law aren't exactly achedemically easy yet many universitys would consider an A-level in it a 'soft subject.' And as others have said many people take 'soft' subjects because they feel they wouldn't be able to handle other subjects.

    You could take a large random sample of students, make them take the course and paper to determin whether its too easy or not. Largely inpractical but there has to be a way.
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    As far as I can see, nobody is told, because schools want their students to get better results, so the school looks better, and as such they advise students to take **** subjects.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Broadly, yes. This sort of thing should be made a lot clearer. Of course, some pupils may still want to study these "soft" subjects - that's perfectly credible, if you ask me - but they should at least realise what the situation is.

    Most parents are too far removed from the educational system to be able to advise on matters like this - if the schools don't, who the hell will?



    A sixteen year old plan his future? I was a ******* idiot when I was 16. There was a boy in my year at that age who still thought it was hilarious to eat cheese and onion crisps, belch in his mouth and blow it at passers-by.

    Sixteen year olds should be out playing in fields or something, not planning what they want to do for the rest of their lives. Hell, I'm in my twenties now, and I don't feel particularly capable of that.
    Incorrect tense.
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    I wasn't well advised from school to college about A-level subject choices. I really wasn't aware of this soft/hard subject debate until TSR. I just chose the subjects that I enjoyed and would do well in. I'm glad I took a language to GCSE and that I chose History and Geography alongside it. However, I was never really that great in the sciences (Maths and science were my weakest GCSEs at grade B) so why would I pick them at A-level? Everyone has their strengths; why should we all study Maths, science or language degrees?

    I do wish I had been properly advised about all this though. My friend who achieved A*s and As at GCSE told me how they kept forcing maths on him in his college interview. I got As and Bs, but never received a talk about my subject choices. They were just put into the computer and then I left. Anyway, he went on to get a U in Maths at AS with ABB at A-level in Biology, Psychology and History. I got AAA after picking the subjects I wanted to do regardless of A-level snobbery (English language, psychology and sociology).

    My degree may not be law, medicine, chemistry or German, but it should give me a better chance of working in publishing, speech therapy or teaching. We don't all want to be lawyers and doctors. I would love to be an English teacher after my degree, but my Dad seems to see this as a 'last-resort'. I HATE that. Why is it wrong for me to aspire to be an English teacher if that's what I'd like to do?
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    (Original post by Natasha_c)
    I don't know but things like law aren't exactly achedemically easy yet many universitys would consider an A-level in it a 'soft subject.' And as others have said many people take 'soft' subjects because they feel they wouldn't be able to handle other subjects.

    You could take a large random sample of students, make them take the course and paper to determin whether its too easy or not. Largely inpractical but there has to be a way.
    So an A Level in Further Maths should be as difficult as an A Level in Maths? Doesn't that kinda defeat the point of it?
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    Apologies if this has been said but I don't wanna read 6 pages. Surely those who are clever enough to be taking maths, languages and sciences, realise that media studies, film studies etc. are soft options and are probably not a good idea to take. The division isn't between "poor" students (what do you even mean by this? anyone who doesn't attend a private school? if so you are very wrong) and better off students, its between brighter students who can investigate for themselves what universities value, and not so bright students - who are very unlikely to have excelled at "hard" subjects anyway if they don't realise that media studies etc. are "soft". Just because someone is apparently "poor" (or by your definition, at a state school) doesn't mean they are unable to distinguish between which subjects universities might value more highly than others.

    Basically, ignorance is no excuse; if you wanna pick more highly valued A-levels then do your own research beforehand instead of blaming "soft" subjects when you find out many places don't like them.
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    (Original post by El Guerrouj)
    Apologies if this has been said but I don't wanna read 6 pages. Surely those who are clever enough to be taking maths, languages and sciences, realise that media studies, film studies etc. are soft options and are probably not a good idea to take. The division isn't between "poor" students (what do you even mean by this? anyone who doesn't attend a private school? if so you are very wrong) and better off students, its between brighter students who can investigate for themselves what universities value, and not so bright students - who are very unlikely to have excelled at "hard" subjects anyway if they don't realise that media studies etc. are "soft". Just because someone is apparently "poor" (or by your definition, at a state school) doesn't mean they are unable to distinguish between which subjects universities might value more highly than others.

    Basically, ignorance is no excuse; if you wanna pick more highly valued A-levels then do your own research beforehand instead of blaming "soft" subjects when you find out many places don't like them.
    The point you seerm to be missing is that those weaker students would be better served not taking subjects like media studies and, probably, not going to university at all.
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    I agree with the article. At my school, teachers aren't actually allowed to say that some subjects are "better" (ie, considered more academically rigorous) than others, and if it weren't for my French teacher quietly taking me to one side and telling me that Cambridge/LSE had blacklisted certain subjects, my choices would have been quite different (this was before I used TSR of course ). The teachers are also dicouraged from saying which unis are more respectable, and I hear the phrase "a degree's a degree" quite a lot. I know prestige isn't everything (contrary to what TSR would have you believe) but they're definitely not being completely honest. Bearing in mind my school is a fairly good grammar, I dread to think what guidance (if at all) others are given.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    The point you seerm to be missing is that those weaker students would be better served not taking subjects like media studies and, probably, not going to university at all.
    I agree in principle, but there are some jobs where A Levels are prefered to other forms of post 16 education but post 18 education isn't required. From a vocational point of view, A Level business or computing might be more handy than another route.
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    (Original post by Pheonixx)
    By the time a kid is 16 they should be able to plan their future; especially if they want to go to uni.
    But they should be ablke to get the information they need from their SCHOOLS, are you saying they should google their questions instead of getting them from their school??
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    (Original post by kevin_123)
    But they should be ablke to get the information they need from their SCHOOLS, are you saying they should google their questions instead of getting them from their school??
    Teachers, connections, google. Yes.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Teachers, connections, google. Yes.
    Retard, Teachers = School

    The school should be a place where the correct information/advice is always given.. what the hell are you thinking man..
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    (Original post by kevin_123)
    But they should be ablke to get the information they need from their SCHOOLS, are you saying they should google their questions instead of getting them from their school??
    Why not?
    How are teachers supposed to know YOU, what YOU want, what your universities of choice will want, and what works best for you as a person? You should find that out yourself.
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    Meh, I do Double Applied Business and Applied ICT and have an offer for Nottingham's Industrial Economics course - AABe. Nottingham isn't exactly a **** University. The other Universities are in my sig; I think I've done ok.
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    (Original post by kevin_123)
    Retard, Teachers = School

    The school should be a place where the correct information/advice is always given.. what the hell are you thinking man..
    So connections place is...?

    Teachers are different from an official 'school' viewpoint. Ask a PE teacher whats important and you'll get a different answer to that of a history teacher and a physics tecaher will disagree again.

    Or they talk as one as 'the school' and don't say there is a difference in a unievrsities eyes between Computing and Futher Maths.
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    I had an economics exam at the same time as the media studies people had one. Before the exam I was revising some topics from economics, they were revising Sony Blu-Ray players because thats what their exam was about.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Why not?
    Because google usually means forums where any random person writes whatever they want.. but the point is, they don't even know there is such a thing as "hard or "soft" subjects so they don't even know to search for it in the first place.. at my school the vast majority chose subjects such as PE, Drama, Dance, Media Studies, Critical Thinking.. but then the vast majority of them are also pretty thick.. but anyway..
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Why not?
    How are teachers supposed to know YOU, what YOU want, what your universities of choice will want, and what works best for you as a person? You should find that out yourself.
    That's not the question.. people are being believed in thinking that "An A level is an A level" Do what you enjoy etc. etc. But then when they're going to apply to a university.. "oh ****, my subjects are worthless"
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    (Original post by kevin_123)
    Because google usually means forums where any random person writes whatever they want.. but the point is, they don't even know there is such a thing as "hard or "soft" subjects so they don't even know to search for it in the first place.. at my school the vast majority chose subjects such as PE, Drama, Dance, Media Studies, Critical Thinking.. but then the vast majority of them are also pretty thick.. but anyway..
    People should be able to do their own research to find out what's best for them and what their universities of choice expect. If they can't, something is VERY wrong with the very fact that they're intending to continue education.
    As I added above, no school teacher is going to know what's best for you. YOU should know that, and you should use a wide variety of sources to find it out.
 
 
 
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