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    (Original post by Pheonixx)
    By the time a kid is 16 they should be able to plan their future; especially if they want to go to uni.
    ********. Most 16 year olds don't know what they want to do with themselves. If you're 16 and all your teachers keep encouraging you to do a certain course you're going to feel pretty inclined to do so.
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    (Original post by Suffix)
    Meh, I do Double Applied Business and Applied ICT and have an offer for Nottingham's Industrial Economics course - AABe. Nottingham isn't exactly a **** University. The other Universities are in my sig; I think I've done ok.
    In addition, I've spoken to some experienced management consultants (I hope to go into a career in consultancy) who have told me that although my subject choices are easy, they aren't regarded as soft as they're practical and some-what relevant. He seemed to think subjects such as sociology, media, art, etc were soft subjects as they were not relevant or helpful at all.
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    (Original post by kevin_123)
    That's not the question.. people are being believed in thinking that "An A level is an A level" Do what you enjoy etc. etc. But then when they're going to apply to a university.. "oh ****, my subjects are worthless"
    Its part of the question. Try applying for history with maths and the three sciences, it won't happen. 'Good' A levels, but not appropriate ones.
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    I agree with this article. It annoys me when people think that the people who got say three As in Photography, Media and Graphics did better than other students who got Cs or Bs in subjects like Chemistry, Biology and Maths, which are MUCH harder. The thing someone said about softer subjects being worth less on UCAS makes sense but I don't think it would be smart to do this because it would cause uproar.
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    (Original post by THRASHx)
    I had an economics exam at the same time as the media studies people had one. Before the exam I was revising some topics from economics, they were revising Sony Blu-Ray players because thats what their exam was about.
    And you think the question of if Blu-Ray is better than HD is more valid/difficult than who was most accountable for the recent global recession?
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    I'd say I was "poor" financially speaking but my school (a comprehensive) encourages people to do science subjects/maths/other academic subjects...even people who don't neccessarily have the intelligence to be able to do them. Some people just couldn't cope with doing all the sciences...like 5/8 of my maths class failed AS and had to retake. I think your school should know u well enough by the time u get to sixth form to know whether ur able enough to do those subjects. In my school...it's a case that they let people do it that found it really really hard at GCSE and they struggle...and often fail. I think people should have the choice...but we need to be realistic as well and not everyone can do maths or chemistry A level and something like media would suit them much better.
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    (Original post by Bagration)
    It should be made clearer by soem subjects being worth less UCAS than others.
    Yeah, but no decent university works on UCAS points, but rather on grades.
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    i think that if you can't work out for yourself which subjects are viewed as 'soft', you're probably not intelligent enough to deserve a place at uni.
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    (Original post by chloedabell)
    I agree with this article. It annoys me when people think that the people who got say three As in Photography, Media and Graphics did better than other students who got Cs or Bs in subjects like Chemistry, Biology and Maths, which are MUCH harder.
    Well, they did. 3 AS levels with A grades is better than 3 AS Levels with B or C grades. Plus, it'll turn out they'll get into the best photography/media/graphics courses with those grades, and those doing Chemistry/Biology/Maths are less likely to get into the top uni's for those subjects with those grades. Different people have different interests, one interest isn't "better" than another interest.
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    (Original post by cfc1992)
    Well, they did. 3 AS levels with A grades is better than 3 AS Levels with B or C grades. Plus, it'll turn out they'll get into the best photography/media/graphics courses with those grades, and those doing Chemistry/Biology/Maths are less likely to get into the top uni's for those subjects with those grades. Different people have different interests, one interest isn't "better" than another interest.
    Well yeah in that case it's obviously better. I was just overemphasizing. I meant just generally people think they're awesome if they got an A in a 'soft' subject and don't seem to realise how hard the 'harder' subjects are. (I do a mixture of both so I understand how different they are).
    I was just referring to to them overvaluing As in 'softer' subjects.
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    This is sadly true...all the people I knew from my younger years in my school/grammars do "hard" subjects...and the ones that went to a comp are now doing psychology/single not further maths when they have the ability/media & health e.t.c.
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    (Original post by chloedabell)
    Well yeah in that case it's obviously better. I was just overemphasizing. I meant just generally people think they're awesome if they got an A in a 'soft' subject and don't seem to realise how hard the 'harder' subjects are. (I do a mixture of both so I understand how different they are).
    I was just referring to to them overvaluing As in 'softer' subjects.
    Exactly. They are awesome if they get an A in the AS subject they did, and if they got A in two others, even better, they're going to get on one of the best courses in the country studying what they want to study - good for them. "hard", "soft" - who gives a ****? - They don't need to realise what studying Biology is like, they're not studying it for A level, they don't want to study it at a degree level, and they probably won't want to use it in their future career if possible, so it's completely irrelevent realising how hard another subject is.
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    (Original post by chloedabell)
    Well yeah in that case it's obviously better. I was just overemphasizing. I meant just generally people think they're awesome if they got an A in a 'soft' subject and don't seem to realise how hard the 'harder' subjects are. (I do a mixture of both so I understand how different they are).
    I was just referring to to them overvaluing As in 'softer' subjects.
    I agree...I did english lit A level (which I know isn't technically considered a soft subject) but with practically no revision I managed to get a high A whereas...maths, music, german and further maths (my other subjects) demand sooo much more of my time and effort and I probably won't get quite as high in those as I did in english.

    It annoys me when people consider music to be a soft subject because it clearly isn't (there's only 2 people at my school in the whole of A level at my school that do it and my headmaster is trying to scrap it because he thinks it's too elitist). I'm in the music department everyday...I'm doing my grade 8 in guitar and I live eat and breathe music but I don't even know whether that's enough to get me an A at A level.
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    Most of these subjects aren't offered at my school (independent), except for business studies (not really soft, but maybe in comparison to economics) and theatre studies. Although we were advised on this when choosing AS levels.

    Although, tbf, it really isn't rocket science to google your course choice and check entry requirements!
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    (Original post by kellywellydoodle)
    I agree...I did english lit A level (which I know isn't technically considered a soft subject) but with practically no revision I managed to get a high A whereas...maths, music, german and further maths (my other subjects) demand sooo much more of my time and effort and I probably won't get quite as high in those as I did in english.

    It annoys me when people consider music to be a soft subject because it clearly isn't (there's only 2 people at my school in the whole of A level at my school that do it and my headmaster is trying to scrap it because he thinks it's too elitist). I'm in the music department everyday...I'm doing my grade 8 in guitar and I live eat and breathe music but I don't even know whether that's enough to get me an A at A level.
    Yeah, I know what you mean about music, I don't do it but a few of my close friends do.
    I agree with English Lit. being a 'harder' subject in a way though because you have to have a natural ability to be able to analyse texts etc. You can't teach yourself that really. It tends to be the top student who are good at English Lit. as well.
    It's weird with English Language as well because that's considered to be in between 'hard' and 'soft' by the likes of Cambridge. I think that's another 'natural ability' subject too because a lot of people in my school actually think its hard when me and the other people in my class, (a 'fast-track' group), think it's really easy.
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    (Original post by Pheonixx)
    Not map it out but they should know if they want to go into science or media and that if they wanted to go into the former, doing the latter and related subjects won't get them anywhere. If they're not in education they either start working or get their parents to support their 'playing in fields'.
    I hear you, I knew people who wanted to be doctors blabla at my secondary school. Problem was at crappy state schools with a < 30% pass rate of 5 A-C's, the teachers don't give you much guidance, hell I'm being truthful when I say this but through 5 years of secondary school I didn't once hear the word "University". There are people from my year back then that are now doing time for armed robbery and just doing odd jobs like painting walls or working in offices doing who knows what lol
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    To be frank, this is plain and simple government policy. 'Improving grades' is not in any way shape or form intended for the good of the country - it's so Labour can show off whilst flushing the country's future down the *******.
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    That's not true everywhere though, I go to a fairly rough state school and you have to do at least one language and are actively encouraged to do 'hard' subjects, and most do.
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    (Original post by maxfire)
    Tbh, as long as the students are doing what they want to do, and are happy, it's fine for them to do (as he so bluntly put it) worthless qualifications.
    At my college, the ones doing media, english, fashion etc seem to have a good time. Not that the ones doing biology, chemistry, further maths aren't but you do get a few people who are doing the subjects just to prove that they're clever and to do what is expected of them.
    How many students in Harrow do you think there are that have been there for years, and have vicarious parents that push them to do things they don't enjoy? And the amount of times I've heard "I'm doing 5 extremely hard A levels because I want to study medicine/law because I want to follow i my dad's footsteps" (which translates to "My parents are forcing me to do what they see as acceptable" ) is insane.

    So yeah, I'd rather do 'soft' subjects that I want to do, than harder subjects that I don't like as much, just because the qualification is 'worth something'. Though really, you'd expect what is said in the article from the headmaster of Harrow, would you not?
    WHAT THE HELL HAVE YOU DONE TO PICKACHU!!:mad:
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    (Original post by Quady)
    And you think the question of if Blu-Ray is better than HD is more valid/difficult than who was most accountable for the recent global recession?
    My exam wasnt anything to do with the recession but theirs was all about Blu-Ray players. That or they spent 3 hours revising one part of the exam; Blue-Ray players.
 
 
 
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