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Autism and its consequences watch

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    My brother was diagnosed with autism when he was young and I have volunteered with them for a good few years.

    I would like to ask about your experiences with those with an autism spectrum disorder (aspergers etc) and your knowledge of them.....

    I do like the Biomedical side to it so if you want to share your knowledge scientifically feel free
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    My brother was diagnosed with autism when he was young and I have volunteered with them for a good few years.

    I would like to ask about your experiences with those with an autism spectrum disorder (aspergers etc) and your knowledge of them.....

    I do like the Biomedical side to it so if you want to share your knowledge scientifically feel free
    I have aspergers, if you have any questions what its like to live with it, then feel free to ask.
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    (Original post by mathperson)
    I have aspergers, if you have any questions what its like to live with it, then feel free to ask.
    I had a friend with mild aspergers but I never spoke to him about it. Do you ever find it a burden or like you are perceived as 'not-normal'. I hate it when people make it a big deal when it really isn't.

    Some people find it difficult socially too, is this the case?
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    I also have it, albeit mildly. I used to suffer from it quite badly, but nowadays, I don't seem to have much social awkwardness (what little I do have is just perceived as me "being unique", and not in a bad way), and the advantages in some ways outweigh the disadvantages.
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    (Original post by Iota Null)
    I also have it, albeit mildly. I used to suffer from it quite badly, but nowadays, I don't seem to have much social awkwardness (what little I do have is just perceived as me "being unique", and not in a bad way), and the advantages in some ways outweigh the disadvantages.
    Yea I know what you mean, my brother was quite bad when he was younger but as he got older he matured and a lot of his bad (typical ASD) habits went away. Hes a good lad and indeed is seen as unique by many who've met him. I wish he would be more willing to get out there and socialise though...he obsesses over his Xbox too much. (for many guys thats normal though )
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    I had a friend with mild aspergers but I never spoke to him about it. Do you ever find it a burden or like you are perceived as 'not-normal'. I hate it when people make it a big deal when it really isn't.

    Some people find it difficult socially too, is this the case?
    It is the case that I find it difficult socially, this is one of the fundemental characteristics of an autism spectrum condition. Infact recently I was so depressed about my lack of social 'competence' that I attempted suicide in November '09.

    However one of the things that I notice about people with autism spectrum conditions, particularly on the higher functioning end, is that we are good with maths/science/etc (I'm doing maths at uni').

    When you say is it a burden, yes it is, in a way. If I don't tell people I've got it until I get to know them then they hardly react. However if I tell someone I don't know particularly well (like someone with dyslexia who also has extra time in exams, just for an example) then they can be really judgemental - but it is only because they know nothing about it, not necessarily because they intend to 'cause harm'.

    When people say stuff like "whats wrong with you"/questions relating to being 'normal', I always explain that there was once a time when the number of babies who died during birth exceeded the number that survived it. I then ask what was wrong with the babies that survived? - which of course they say "nothing". I then explain that it is illogical to think that just because something doesn't behave in a way that is 'average'/how you expect it to behave, it doesn't mean that there is something wrong with it. I sometimes go on to say how the babies that survived during that time did so because they were 'stronger', and link this to the number of famous scientists/mathematicians who probably had asperger's (einstein/dirac/etc).
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    You might want to post this in Health? There's an entire thread there for people with Aspergers.
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    I spent about 3 months working at a specialist school for children on the autism spectrum as a voluntary teaching assistant. it's great work, though sometimes quite challenging, and I’d definitely do it again. :yep:

    If you want to find out more about the condition I’d recommend this course by the OU. It covers everything and the textbooks are brilliant. I'm about halfway through it myself.
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    I have worked a lot with kids/adults with autism over the summer at a camp in the US and I loved it! I think they are so interesting. Some were worse cases than others.

    There was one girl who was 18 and you couldn't have a proper conversation with her at all. She would repeat the same phrases over and over - I still remember what she said now - "walmart, sarah's a bad girl(which was her name), a fake cry then would clap her hands and say 'LETS Go sarah!' She would also slap her head REALLY hard or other people. It's like she had no physical control over it. And she would do this over and over. Only time she went quiet/remained still was when eating and if you painted her nails! So I used to paint her nails lots of times and she seemed to like that!
    There had to be someone with her at ALL times even throughout the night because she would run off and if she saw any paper, she would rip it and take it to the toilet to flush! Also she would try and eat anything - included her own poo - so i can imagine if you were her parents it would be very hard to live with!
    I also had a camper who was about 8 and he wasn't as bad. He LOVED bugs - and constantly kept picking them up and killing them sometimes. He didn't smile much/express emotions and found it hard to interact with people but he didn't seem that bad compared to the girl above.
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    I have Aspergers. Used to be a major problem in late primary and early secondary school; people didn't understand my obsessions with transport, maps and foreign things and used to bully me, calling me "gay" et cetera. Then I made virtually no effort to make friends as I thought everyone was against me. Still a major engine nerd, still have slight social difficulty, but I just keep it to myself. When I used to be asked what I was doing, I used to say "standing here talking to you." Now it's more "nothing".

    I used to get obsessed continually, then less so and found that I was "naked" without an obsession, now I get them only occasionally.
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    (Original post by mathperson)
    However one of the things that I notice about people with autism spectrum conditions, particularly on the higher functioning end, is that we are good with maths/science/etc (I'm doing maths at uni').
    Interesting. My brother and a friend have it - they're both good at maths/computers.

    The friend did recently mention on Facebook that he has autism. It's been obvious (to me, anyway) for the last 5/6 years that he has it - he's too much like my brother.

    Is it just me, or do they just talk about the same subjects over & over again? All my friend talks about is, his family, music and football.
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    (Original post by Titch89)
    Interesting. My brother and a friend have it - they're both good at maths/computers.

    The friend did recently mention on Facebook that he has autism. It's been obvious (to me, anyway) for the last 5/6 years that he has it - he's too much like my brother.

    Is it just me, or do they just talk about the same subjects over & over again? All my friend talks about is, his family, music and football.
    Actually yes! Repetition is one of the main characteristics of Autism. My brother has a crazy obsession with South Park (toys, games, clothes, scripts, dvds) and it was Rugrats when he was younger. He spends most of his time chatting away about Manchester United/football in general, wrestling and south park.

    Oh and he thinks Beyonce is divine! :P

    My friend has Aspergers and studies Maths at Oxbridge...have no idea what he is doing now though...proly a Masters
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    (Original post by rockrunride)
    I have Aspergers. Used to be a major problem in late primary and early secondary school; people didn't understand my obsessions with transport, maps and foreign things and used to bully me, calling me "gay" et cetera. Then I made virtually no effort to make friends as I thought everyone was against me. Still a major engine nerd, still have slight social difficulty, but I just keep it to myself. When I used to be asked what I was doing, I used to say "standing here talking to you." Now it's more "nothing".

    I used to get obsessed continually, then less so and found that I was "naked" without an obsession, now I get them only occasionally.
    This is what my brother wants to get into (sorry my brother is the inspiration for this thread) he loves how engines work and used to read this manual all about how to put an engine together.

    Lol standing here talking to you...I've used that line
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    (Original post by Holamigo)
    I have worked a lot with kids/adults with autism over the summer at a camp in the US and I loved it! I think they are so interesting. Some were worse cases than others.

    There was one girl who was 18 and you couldn't have a proper conversation with her at all. She would repeat the same phrases over and over - I still remember what she said now - "walmart, sarah's a bad girl(which was her name), a fake cry then would clap her hands and say 'LETS Go sarah!' She would also slap her head REALLY hard or other people. It's like she had no physical control over it. And she would do this over and over. Only time she went quiet/remained still was when eating and if you painted her nails! So I used to paint her nails lots of times and she seemed to like that!
    There had to be someone with her at ALL times even throughout the night because she would run off and if she saw any paper, she would rip it and take it to the toilet to flush! Also she would try and eat anything - included her own poo - so i can imagine if you were her parents it would be very hard to live with!
    I also had a camper who was about 8 and he wasn't as bad. He LOVED bugs - and constantly kept picking them up and killing them sometimes. He didn't smile much/express emotions and found it hard to interact with people but he didn't seem that bad compared to the girl above.
    I volunteered at a school with kids with disabilities and we this one girl who loved to aggravate the others and swear..she took real patience. She couldn't speak well but you could tell that she was intelligent. She was very good at manipulating people, especially her family.

    I've had amazing experiences with kids with ASD ...shame my work hours stopped me being able to
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    (Original post by mathperson)
    It is the case that I find it difficult socially, this is one of the fundemental characteristics of an autism spectrum condition. Infact recently I was so depressed about my lack of social 'competence' that I attempted suicide in November '09.

    However one of the things that I notice about people with autism spectrum conditions, particularly on the higher functioning end, is that we are good with maths/science/etc (I'm doing maths at uni').

    When you say is it a burden, yes it is, in a way. If I don't tell people I've got it until I get to know them then they hardly react. However if I tell someone I don't know particularly well (like someone with dyslexia who also has extra time in exams, just for an example) then they can be really judgemental - but it is only because they know nothing about it, not necessarily because they intend to 'cause harm'.

    When people say stuff like "whats wrong with you"/questions relating to being 'normal', I always explain that there was once a time when the number of babies who died during birth exceeded the number that survived it. I then ask what was wrong with the babies that survived? - which of course they say "nothing". I then explain that it is illogical to think that just because something doesn't behave in a way that is 'average'/how you expect it to behave, it doesn't mean that there is something wrong with it. I sometimes go on to say how the babies that survived during that time did so because they were 'stronger', and link this to the number of famous scientists/mathematicians who probably had asperger's (einstein/dirac/etc).
    I remember you, you made a few threads that you were suicidal...I'm glad you've gotten through it in the end.

    I think some people are so very ignorant towards autism/aspergers etc its irritating. Its not like their is anything 'wrong' with those who have it, its just that their brain is wired differently or deal with things differently..not necessarily a disadvantage!!
    The people you mentioned (einstein etc ) had incredible minds and it may well be that their disability was in fact a blessing in disguise!

    The emotional aspect to aspergers etc is of course frustrating though...I find that although you may appear less likely to socialise you are actually a nice person.just takes a few extra steps and some understanding to make a friendship!
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    The emotional aspect to aspergers etc is of course frustrating though...I find that although you may appear less likely to socialise you are actually a nice person.just takes a few extra steps and some understanding to make a friendship!
    I've found this too. The friend I've mentioned is a lovely person to spend time with and talk to; but it can be so frustrating at times. Many times I'm just thinking "please shut up for 5 minutes!"
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    (Original post by Titch89)
    I've found this too. The friend I've mentioned is a lovely person to spend time with and talk to; but it can be so frustrating at times. Many times I'm just thinking "please shut up for 5 minutes!"
    I have a mate that has no disability or anything but I feel the same way :lol:
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    (Original post by Mr.Strue)
    if you had autism you wouldn't have friends I<3LAMP.

    troll.
    I know autistic people who have friends.
    Autistic conditions are quite broad..there are those who have it not so bad actually.
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    Yea I know what you mean, my brother was quite bad when he was younger but as he got older he matured and a lot of his bad (typical ASD) habits went away. Hes a good lad and indeed is seen as unique by many who've met him. I wish he would be more willing to get out there and socialise though...he obsesses over his Xbox too much. (for many guys thats normal though )
    My bro also has mild ASD and that could have been written about him! He's always been a quiet, good lad but was a late bloomer at school in terms of academics - he's doing a HND in computing now, which is awesome as noone thought he'd even do A-levels when he was younger.

    The social thing is the big issue for him now, but being 19 and not liking alcohol he's unfortunately struggling to meet lads his age to become friends, rather than just acquaintances, with.

    I'm proud of everything he's achieved, he struggled a lot as a kid and definitely stood out as a bit 'different' but has overcome his difficulties and is essentially pretty 'normal' now. tbh I try not to label him as autistic anymore as I think he feels that the label holds him back more than his autistic characteristics actually do!

    My mum does SEN at a school and so I've met and helped her with more severly autistic kids. it's incredible what a broad range of symptoms they can have. I've always enjoyed working with them and finding out about the characters behind some of the more obvious autistc traits they have...
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    I'd prefer to stay anon OP, it's an issue quite personal to me so don't really want to disclose myself.

    I'm not sure about the relevance of my post, but I thought I'd share my experience. My nephew (aged 4) was recently 'diagnosed' with autism. I say 'diagnosed' because it hasn't been 'official' yet but autism and microcephaly are the findings in all the medical/behaviour tests he has had done.

    His mother didn't actually realise that there was anything different, but another family member spotted from a few months that he didn't respond much to things, didn't show emotion (he never cried, but I dunno if this is an autistic trait or not) like he never laughed or made eye contact at all. I guess what 'triggered' the 'diagnosis' was when the doctor realised the speech delay- he can't talk yet, just a few words here and there and he doesn't seem to understand when being spoken to, apart from a few basic phrases, i.e. "sit down".

    Other 'traits' he has shown are: flapping of the hands, occasionally walks 'inwards', often plays with something for a long, long time.

    Urm I guess the hardest thing was how his mother 'dealt' with it. She took it really badly, blaming herself etc. And I guess the hardest thing for her is acceptance, like she's still in denial and is still waiting for that one day for him to "snap out of it", she says. And it's so heartbreaking to see her like crying every evening, putting her life on hold- like she wont make an active effort to do anything like see her friends because she's "waiting for him to get better".

    She doesn't believe there is anything wrong with him and doesn't take him anywhere, i.e. if she goes to a wedding or a family do she'll leave him with someone out of fear of what someone may say. The annoying thing about Asians is that they can be really ignorant at times. Like they'll go up to her and say "whats wrong with him" in a really condescending way, and insensitive comments like that really get to her.

    He's a really lovely boy, and he seems to be really enjoying his time at his new school ( a special needs school, sorry couldn't think of a PC term for it) and the support there has been fantastic. I guess the hardest thing will be helping his mum to deal with it. And personally I think she needs to support him and encourage him rather than expect some sort of overnight miracle, and she has this frame of mind that if you're autistic you can't have a normal life, which I believe is untrue. I wish I knew how to help.

    Sorry OP for this overly long post.
 
 
 
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