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    hi
    i am interested in working in the financial sector in future.
    What are the graduate prospects of MMORSE? Is it well recognised by employers? How does it compare to Imperial maths/stats for finance? which is better?
    How does MMORSE compare to LSE economics/maths/finance degree in terms of working as an analyst in financial institutions? I have heard ppl thinking LSE is better but isn't mmorse more quantitative compared to any LSE degree?

    thanks for any advice given
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    MMORSE is arguably the flagship degree of the university. Many of my friends had turned down LSE and Imperial to do MORSE. Employment prospects are particularly good in the Trading and Structuring roles within banks, and also allows you to move to Actuary (it gives you exemptions from certain actuarial exams) if that is of interest to you. Sales and IBD - well, you won't be leveraging your degree as such for getting such a role because any degree can suffice. Where MORSE does have a competitive advantage is in the set of roles mentioned earlier. The degree does give a lot of flexibility in allowing you to take modules from WBS and other external departments as well. I got asked during my internship why I chose Econ over MORSE, because the natural course of action would be to choose the uni's best course, considering I had the option.

    Employment prospects are equally bright from all three institutions. It's essentially a lifestyle choice that you have to make - London vs Campus. It's a huge lifestyle difference, and an important one to consider when making a decision.
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    How does lse and warwick maths and econ compare ??????
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    What sort of applicant picks MORSE over maths?

    Looking at the modules and course structure you're going to meet all of the material in the context of a regular maths degree anyway, depent on your choices (although perhaps not the economics one.) You also don't seem to be able to take any course on PDEs for example, whereas you could do in the MMath.
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    (Original post by Christo)
    What sort of applicant picks MORSE over maths?

    Looking at the modules and course structure you're going to meet all of the material in the context of a regular maths degree anyway, depent on your choices (although perhaps not the economics one.) You also don't seem to be able to take any course on PDEs for example, whereas you could do in the MMath.
    I can think of a few viable reasons to pick MORSE over maths.
    -It generally (regardless whether you want to do IB or whatever) shows that you have a solid background in data modeling and statistics, whereas a maths grad can get a way with minimal knowledge of probability theory.
    -The course has a good reputation and is quite well-known, it somewhat sets you apart.
    -All of the course will be vaguely relevant and connected to the kinds of stuff you're interested in if you consider applying for it. This is not necessarily the case with maths (although Warwick Maths/Econ is quite flexible as well I guess).

    I don't really see why you mention PDEs. They are (on a real mathematical level - there are PDEs in econ lectures as well) only relevant for derivs people and quants, and only the latter would actually be required to have rigorously studied them at university. But then quants are almost exclusively PhDs anyways, so the undergrad choice is not very important.
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    With Warwick straight maths (and pretty much any variation) you can take almost any module you want. In second year, half of your modules are optional and can be taken from pretty much any department. Its the same in the third year. So a maths student can take the same statistics modules as a Morse student anyway.

    A Morse student can take PDE.
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    (Original post by Christo)
    You also don't seem to be able to take any course on PDEs for example, whereas you could do in the MMath.
    This is not true. You can take PDEs.
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    if you take the econ stream of mmorse it seems to tailor quite well in terms of the modules you are encouraged to take.

    mmorse is one of those courses that is i'm sure isn't properly appreciated by employers. The 'required' modules far surpass what a standard econ student has to do at Warwick in terms of difficulty.

    I could think of a million reasons someone would take the 'taxing but applied' mmorse over the mmath course.
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    hey guys, what about UCL Maths? I hear Warwick and Imperial Maths is on a much higher level, but LSE is good for its reputation, but surely UCL stands somewhere up there too? what prospects can a UCL Maths graduate expect compared to these other unis?
 
 
 
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