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    Steroids.

    Not Allowed.
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    I'm scared of needles.

    I also have AIDS
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    I kid, I kid.
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    (Original post by morg)
    i believe you have to be 18?

    i'm on the organ donor register though
    Nope, it's 17 for some reason.

    P.S Sorry If this has already been answered, i couldn't be bothered to read through all the pages of comments.
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    (Original post by *Rouge*)
    do you have to make an appointment or can you just turn up on the day..?!?!
    You can turn up on the day, but they're often busy, so you should book to make sure you get to give.
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    the fear of getting HIV
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    i have an organ donor card but last time i tried to give blood i had a panic attack followed by fainting, getting a massive gash on my head and the only thing that got blood was the friggin floor.
    the blood taker person said i shouldnt bother again
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    I was going to give blood on friday but then I found out I couldn't as I took anti-malarials during a trip to S America in august. Turns out it has to be 6 months, just missed out Plus I had a sore throat, so that would have discounted me anyway.

    Has anyone thought about bone marrow donation?
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    Never wanted to because I was scared of needles
    Then ended up with ITP and was getting my blood taken many times a day to check my platlets .... severely scared of needles so it was hell for me
    after the number of blood tests to check up on my platlets for the past year you would think I would be getting used to it by now but unfortunately no

    They wouldnt let me give blood now anyway because I had that illness
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Inspiring words bro -_-
    It's true. What was wrong with what I said there?

    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Most people are fully aware of how blood donation saves lives. You fail to see the reason why they don't donate. They just don't really bring themself to go and donate blood, 99% of the time that's because they just keep putting it off and never get round to it. You can guilt-trip them all you want, but it won't make them donate with the procrastination blockade in the way. My blood drives example in the last paragraph shows how we can get around this problem.
    The more impact an ad has the more it sticks in your mind making you more likely to do something. Evidently the adverts are having a quite significant impact on the viewers or you wouldn't have reacted so badly to them. Case in point you forget that the last several give blood adverts have ALL been focusing

    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Here's where you are wrong. For god's sakes, it's THEIR blood. I love that society has evolved such a powerful altruism that charitable acts have become so commonplace, but don't think for a second anyone is entitled to anyone else's charity.
    Straw-man. I never said they were. I simply said that reminding people of the affects of their charity or their with-holding of it is a perfectly acceptable way to foster it.

    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Maybe instead of focusing on the deaths that result from a shortage of blood donors, you should consider all the various lives that have been SAVED purely through people's generosity?
    Here you yourself have come in testimony to exactly what I said above. The guilt trip impact sticks with you for longer making you more likely to act on it.

    http://www.youtube.com/v/tijSx_fwoM0&hl=en_GB&fs=1&

    or even

    http://www.blood.co.uk/video-audio-l.../tv-radio-ads/ which are the current blood adverts. Why on earth is it do you think that you remember the other one more readily? Could it be the content which you deplore?

    (Original post by innerhollow)
    It's inspiring actually that so many are willing to do so with no benefit to themselves. Bottom line is that if you want me to do something nice for you, I'll do it only if I want, and you damn well better ask me nicely for it.
    You see the main problem is the people that would be asking you nicely are all dead or dying.

    Or does this count as asking nicely enough?

    http://www.youtube.com/v/lR1sWpJzUuw&hl=en_GB&fs=1&

    She ticks the box of asking nicely alright, but do you regard this advert "sick" too for focussing on the negative aspect of people not giving blood?

    (Original post by innerhollow)
    No those adverts were sick. Many of them gave a clear and distinct message that if you do not give blood you are actively choosing to kill someone. "Kill Jill: Yes or No?" and all that. If you think that doesn't communicate the message, "YOU'RE A MURDERER FOR NOT GIVING BLOOD!", then please concede that to most people they do. People don't respond well to those kinds of things, and quite right they shouldn't.
    I haven't seen the "Kill Jill: Yes or No?" advert personally so I can't comment on the content. But it's pretty undeniable that they're effective as an advertising mechanism. 1 million people (out of a total 16 million) signed up between March 2008 and April 2009.

    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Your view on charitable acts is abhorrent. I get that you want to hold saving lives in paramount importance, but it's not the way to go about. You cannot force the hand of generosity.
    Again you're not getting what I'm saying. It's just adverts to make sure people are fully aware of the difference between the NHS having enough blood and organs and the NHS not. Noone is holding a gun to your head and forcing the altruism. If you had no idea about the deaths or suffering (which if it weren't for advertising who would, it's not like people sit around pondering what would happen if they didn't do a charitable act without some kind of prompt) you would have no incentive to do it. The point of these advertising campaigns is to make you aware of that.

    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Altruism is a beautiful thing and should be encouraged and brought out of people in POSITIVE WAY, not extorted and drained from people through instilling guilt. Keep trying that and soon no one will care.
    But the adverts are working. It's just plain not true to say otherwise. As I said between March 2008 and April 2009 1 million more people signed on to the organ donor register.

    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Blood drives at schools are an example of a positive way to encourage blood donation- where students in Sixth Form are given the opportunity to take an afternoon of school and get driven down to a local blood bank to donate if they want. We have this at my school, and it's a huge success every year. That's the sort of route we should be taking- blood drive iniatives at schools, workplaces etc. Those are positive, encouraging things which are actually effective, not these disgusting guilt-wrenching adverts.
    And they can't work in conjunction with adverts reminding you of the negative side because?
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    I'm not sure I'm allowed given that I had a black girlfriend from Ghana.

    Anyway, can't sexually promiscuous heterosexuals give blood? Last time I checked heterosexuals can have as many sexual partners as they like and practice unprotected sex (orally, vaginally and anally) and not be prohibited from donating blood. There is no way I'm having blood from polygamous people like that.
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    I'm not too good with the sharp end of needles, and that's one of the reasons that I'm considering going along to give it a shot (therapy, I suppose). They tap O negative off of my dad, so there's half a chance that I could be all speshul too.
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    (Original post by big-bang-theory)
    I'm not a fan of the rule personally. My comment was more a point of pedantry about you mentioning the extensive tests they do for blood disease and assuming these are fullproof. That's why they warn you not to give blood if you think there is any chance you might have HIV and to get a normal HIV test instead first.
    Well, it's true, they are by no means foolproof. If I thought I might have HIV at all, I'd get tested. And then again. And then I'd feel okay, I guess.
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    (Original post by cousto)
    the fear of getting HIV
    How does that one work then, genius?
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    I am using all of my blood for carrying Oxygen.
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    I've given blood once and I recently found out that I have a rare blood type AB+ only 3% of people have that. I now have to give blood as often as I can because I hate the idea that I could be stopping those people living. It also makes me get over my fear of needles because it was so painless.
    My donation didnt hurt at all however it was uncomfortable. She had to twist the needle round whilst it was in my arm because my blood wasn't flowing quick enough. I'd recommend definately.
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    Scared and don't know where to get it done
    Also, I'm not old enough to be eligible yet anyway haha :laugh:
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    I would, but I've ingested so much **** in my time my blood glows in the dark.
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    Because they wont let me. My personal life makes my blood Inadequate in their eyes; even though all blood is screened.
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    I'm going to try but last time I got blood taken I nearly fainted! Horrible, horrible feeling. Guess it's worth it in the end though.
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    I can't, when I went to get tested to donate I was told I don't weigh enough.
 
 
 
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