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    I'm not allowed because I obviously have aids :woo:
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    I can't, under the weight minimum, too little iron and even if the last two factors vastly improve, I've a major problem with antibodies meaming I've an inderactive thyroid despite being underweight..so I never can. I would if I could!
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    I want to, but they won't let me where I live.

    Most of the rest of the world won't let you donate blood if you've lived in the UK any time from when BSE was around, despite that there's absolutely no evidence to suggest anyone's ever got CJD from a blood transfusion and that the UK was not the only country to have it (I mean even France doesn't let you and they had plenty of BSE, so did the US and they have the same policy.) It's really idiotic.

    It's an even more ridiculous law than the blanket ban on any guy who's had sex with another man from giving blood-which is amazingly stupid. I especially don't get that even if all the arguments about gay men being more likely to have HIV are kind of valid, that they test all the blood anyway, and they act as if to implicate some simple policy that allowed some gay men to give blood would be impractical. I mean, not that I agree with any restriction straight people aren't already subject to (I can go off and sleep with as many people as I like and they'll still let me give blood without even asking me about it, but a gay guy could have been in a relationship with one person for years and they're not allowed? Whats that about?) but for a start why can't they at least just add a condition such as that you have to have been in a monogamous relationship for a year and had an negative HIV test in the last 6 months? That's two tick boxes on a form. Easy.

    I will be donating the first opportunity when I'm at uni in the UK though (and might even sign up to the bone marrow register). I'm O negative, so they need my blood.
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    Not a fan of needles. Fainted the last two times I've had injections. Although once was because I was allergic to anaesthetic in the injection.
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    I do.
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    Anyone do compotent donating? - it looks dead boring.
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    I faint and start throwing up everywhere - something not really appreciated by the blood people.
    I'd really LIKE to give blood, but they don't like me being there

    Silly Body....
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    I'd actually really like to, would help too as I'm fairly fit. But I've received blood transfusions before so I'm not allowed to donate. Such a pity that the largest potential pool of donators are cut off in this way.
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    Low blood pressure so I don't wanna give myself a reason to feel faint/actually faint.
    Anaemic also, so I'm not allowedd.

    Saying that, I am a needle phobe so I don't know if I would even if I was allowed.
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    I don't mind needles, it's just the idea of blood leaving my body, and lots of blood not just a bit. Urgghh.I know it's a horrible selfish thing not to do it.
    But I do have an organ donor card, just so if I die and I'm not using my body it can help other people, or be the subject of experiments, whatever. My body is going to have a much more interesting life when I die, I'm sure.
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    Oh damn, I want to, I just keep forgetting, thanks for the reminder. Also I used to think the age limit was 18, but it's 17. I went on the website a few times and I was a bit confused about how to make an appointment. Hmm, I just saw the blood donation van in my local high street, maybe I will just pop in to ask them about it.
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Well, it's a personal choice whether or not to give blood
    It's a personal choice to do anything in your life, not just give blood.

    (Original post by innerhollow)
    people shouldn't feel pressurised to.
    Why? What do you regard as making people feel "pressurised". Is asking them if they'd like to come along pressurising them? Is letting them know of the very real benefits that come from it pressurising? A single donation genuinely could be the diffrerence between life and death for someone else. Does reminding you of that fact make you feel "pressured" into doing it. I mean I can understand you personally not wanting to change your entire lifestyle and sexuality simply so you can give blood but those without a good reason, why shouldn't they be told exactly what blood donation does?

    (Original post by innerhollow)
    A lot of people don't have a good reason for not donating blood (i.e. my parents), it's just not something they do.
    Yes? A lot of people don't have good reasons for doing a lot of things they should do. That doesn't mean they shouldn't make an effort to do those things or be reminded of their benefits if they did do them

    (Original post by innerhollow)
    The advertising campaigns for giving blood are also shameless and irritating- making you out to be a murderer if you don't give blood.
    They don't make you out to be a murderer. They depict what is a very real difference between having accessible blood (or for that matter organs) and not. If it's not put in front of people they don't realise and it goes on, people genuinely die from lack of organs in the UK by the hundreds. Why should people not be reminded of that because people don't want to feel guilty about not donating. That's the point of the advertising, to guilt people into signing up because if it doesn't happen people do actually die.
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    Oh damn, I want to, I just keep forgetting, thanks for the reminder. Also I used to think the age limit was 18, but it's 17. I went on the website a few times and I was a bit confused about how to make an appointment. Hmm, I just saw the blood donation van in my local high street, maybe I will just pop in to ask them about it.
    I think most times if they are quiet you don't really need to make an appointment.
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    (Original post by heidigirl)
    I want to, but they won't let me where I live.

    Most of the rest of the world won't let you donate blood if you've lived in the UK any time from when BSE was around, despite that there's absolutely no evidence to suggest anyone's ever got CJD from a blood transfusion and that the UK was not the only country to have it (I mean even France doesn't let you and they had plenty of BSE, so did the US and they have the same policy.) It's really idiotic.

    It's an even more ridiculous law than the blanket ban on any guy who's had sex with another man from giving blood-which is amazingly stupid. I especially don't get that even if all the arguments about gay men being more likely to have HIV are kind of valid, that they test all the blood anyway, and they act as if to implicate some simple policy that allowed some gay men to give blood would be impractical. I mean, not that I agree with any restriction straight people aren't already subject to (I can go off and sleep with as many people as I like and they'll still let me give blood without even asking me about it, but a gay guy could have been in a relationship with one person for years and they're not allowed? Whats that about?) but for a start why can't they at least just add a condition such as that you have to have been in a monogamous relationship for a year and had an negative HIV test in the last 6 months? That's two tick boxes on a form. Easy.

    I will be donating the first opportunity when I'm at uni in the UK though (and might even sign up to the bone marrow register). I'm O negative, so they need my blood.
    Oh yeah, I've heard about this. I don't really get it though, why not just test them for it first, instead of just rejecting them straight away? I thought NHS need all the blood they can get?
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    (Original post by OGC)
    It's painless and a mild inconvenience; it saves lives.
    Why dont you donate on a weekly basis then?
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    (Original post by Salavant)
    Pedantry: You can't have an AIDS-test so much as you can have a HIV test. And I'm reasonably certain I have neither.

    Part of me doesn't want to lie as a sort of protest: but there's nothing wrong with my blood, and I could help someone by doing so. It's a bit of a silly law: I presume they check the blood anyways before putting it in someone.
    It can take up to a month or so for something like HIV to be able to show up on the tests they run.
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    (Original post by Paul Bartram)
    I think most times if they are quiet you don't really need to make an appointment.
    Okey dokey, thanks
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    I do
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    Scared of Needle pain, i mean damn those school injections were painful..

    I have no idea about my blood type and i always seem to be ill, i'd guilty giving a car crash patient my blood thats laced with flu.
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    (Original post by josh_a_y)
    Why dont you donate on a weekly basis then?
    Takes 16 weeks to get iton back.

    It is possible to donate every two weeks, you are attached to this machine that takes platelets out of you blood, it the recycles your blood back into your body - this takes around 80 - 90 mins.
 
 
 
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