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    In a text book i'm revising from there's a formula for calculating Electric Potential in a radial field, but I didn't know if there was a formula i might need to know for a uniform field? Between 2 charged plates or something.
    Cheers.
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    (Original post by Cookie29)
    In a text book i'm revising from there's a formula for calculating Electric Potential in a radial field, but I didn't know if there was a formula i might need to know for a uniform field? Between 2 charged plates or something.
    Cheers.
    If you learnt about gravitational potential the concept is pretty similar.
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    the electric potential is just the difference between the two plates so you could just work it out as you'd be given the value for each plate
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    In a uniform field between 2 plates, for example, the electric field is just V/d where V is pd and d is separation of plates. This is because electric field is equivalent to potential gradient. Here the gradient is uniform. The potential varies uniformly between the plates. The equipotential lines are parallel and equally spaced.
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    (Original post by Stonebridge)
    In a uniform field between 2 plates, for example, the electric field is just V/d where V is pd and d is separation of plates. This is because electric field is equivalent to potential gradient. Here the gradient is uniform. The potential varies uniformly between the plates. The equipotential lines are parallel and equally spaced.

    they're asking about the electric potential
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    The electric potential is just equal to the voltage at that point - 0 at the 0v plate, and whatever the positive plate is at that one.
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    I was thinking, electrical potential much like gravitational potential are proportional to M and Q, but besides gravitational, electrical may also have another charge behind it providing a force aswell as the other charge attracting it, does this affect EP as the particle?

    Slightly offtopic:
    Also, if we have two plates, one at 0v and the other 1500Volts, does this just mean the plate at 1500Volts has a posititve charge differential against 0V? Don't quite know how to word it.
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    (Original post by MM1234)
    they're asking about the electric potential
    Yes I know. So was my answer. If you read my answer, you will notice that I've said that "Here the gradient is uniform. The potential varies uniformly between the plates. "

    That's how you calculate the potential at a point between the plates.
    If it goes from 10V to zero between 2 plates 10 cm apart, the potential half way (5cm) will be 5 Volts. That's what uniform means.
 
 
 
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