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    Hi, I have a test probably this thursday on addictions, specifically factors that affect the vulnerablity to addictions. The one thing I don't really get is attributions. The text book is fairly vague, only one big study (Davies 1996). The way I understand it is that its similar to heuristics, i.e. we change our oppinions to justify our changing behaviours and to preserve self-esteem. Am I right? Can I be any more specific than that? My syllabus is AQA btw.
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    Attributions are the way in which people attempt to explain the behaviour of others using the often limited social evidence at hand. As a result, such attributions tend to be biased, mainly in an internally/stable kind of way.

    E.g. a person is rude to us on the street and we naturally assume that the person just has a horrible personality, as opposed to considering the person might be running late, just got fired, wife kicked him out etc etc. Other variables include time availability, level of importance etc.

    Examples of the kind of evidence available include:
    Locus, Stability, Controllability, Internal/External

    Other important things worth noting include:
    Covariation model, Actor-Observer Bias, Perceptual salience, Self-serving attributional bias, Nieve-scientist model.

    Hope that helps. It's a really nice theory which really does reflect decision making pretty accurately.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Attributions are the way in which people attempt to explain the behaviour of others using the often limited social evidence at hand. As a result, such attributions tend to be biased, mainly in an internally/stable kind of way.

    E.g. a person is rude to us on the street and we naturally assume that the person just has a horrible personality, as opposed to considering the person might be running late, just got fired, wife kicked him out etc etc. Other variables include time availability, level of importance etc.

    Examples of the kind of evidence available include:
    Locus, Stability, Controllability, Internal/External

    Other important things worth noting include:
    Covariation model, Actor-Observer Bias, Perceptual salience, Self-serving attributional bias, Nieve-scientist model.

    Hope that helps. It's a really nice theory which really does reflect decision making pretty accurately.
    cool, i understand that, but how does that relate to addictions? im not really sure i understand the study by davies if you know the one i mean.
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    (Original post by Sad Clown)
    cool, i understand that, but how does that relate to addictions? im not really sure i understand the study by davies if you know the one i mean.
    I gewgled it and I found the following (see attached file).
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: doc DA.doc (75.0 KB, 424 views)
 
 
 
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