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    Hi,

    I want to be a lawyer and have been advised that the best way to do this is to do a degree in something else first and then a law conversion course as employers like this. Is this true?

    Apparently it shows that you are more versatile. I want to do a history degree but I am worried that this would not be what employers want maybe?

    Is a history degree and then a law conversion course a good move?

    thank you
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    :lolwut:

    If you want to be a lawyer, study law!
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    It obviously can be done, but unless you have a particular interest in History then it will be a waste of time. I have offers to do both History and Law degrees and have decided to do History then graduate law as I love History but the only career I can envisage myself in is a legal one. I can do a subject I love and still gain entry to the the career I want.
    Doing another degree before doesn't really advantage you in any way so unless you really want to do History straight law would be your best bet.
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    The short answer is no, but the long and very detailed answer is partly yes. It's not so much that it shows you are more versatile but that it offers a different route. I suppose it really does depend on your degree, but imo (and I cannoty stress this enough) a language degree and then a law conversion course would be more versatile and a history degree may well be in the same league as this.

    However, if you find that you want to do a law degree because you'll enjoy it, then do this and this saves you a year as you don't need the law conversion course as long it's a QLD, and it also saves you the cost of the conversion course/GDL, on the flipside if you think that you will find a law degree boring (let's not kid ourselves, some aspects are) then do a degree that interests you and then do a law conversion course but bear in mind the extra year and the extra costs. A lot of people do a history degree and then do a conversion course, you only need to trawl through the websites of many law firms to see this.

    If you're still worried, 'MC' law firm Slaughter & May have 'bragged' that their intake is something like 50% of non-law students (as in those that have done a law conversion course)

    I on the other hand chose to do a law degree because I wanted to.

    (Original post by Bubbles*de*Milo)
    :lolwut:

    If you want to be a lawyer, study law
    You don't need to study law to become a lawyer.
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    (Original post by sleekchic)
    The short answer is no, but the long and very detailed answer is partly yes. It's not so much that it shows you are more versatile but that it offers a different route. I suppose it really does depend on your degree, but imo (and I cannoty stress this enough) a language degree and then a law conversion course would be more versatile and a history degree may well be in the same league as this.

    However, if you find that you want to do a law degree because you'll enjoy it, then do this and this saves you a year as you don't need the law conversion course as long it's a QLD, and it also saves you the cost of the conversion course/GDL, on the flipside if you think that you will find a law degree boring (let's not kid ourselves, some aspects are) then do a degree that interests you and then do a law conversion course but bear in mind the extra year and the extra costs. A lot of people do a history degree and then do a conversion course, you only need to trawl through the websites of many law firms to see this.

    If you're still worried, 'MC' law firm Slaughter & May have 'bragged' that their intake is something like 50% of non-law students (as in those that have done a law conversion course)

    I on the other hand chose to do a law degree because I wanted to.



    You don't need to study law to become a lawyer.
    I know, but if you know from the offset that you want to be a lawyer, logic dictates you study law.
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    (Original post by Bubbles*de*Milo)
    I know, but if you know from the offset that you want to be a lawyer, logic dictates you study law.
    Not necessarily.

    If you know from the offset that you want to be a lawyer, but you also know that you will find a law degree boring, why put yourself through 3 years of hell when you could be studying something more interesting?

    I personally don't think it's boring but a lot of people on my course do and I can't help wondering why you would want to study something that isn't interesting when there are other routes into the career.
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    If you want to be a lawyer but there is also a separate field that you have a PASSION for, then theoretically you could opt for that field instead then convert afterwards. Setting time and costs aside, you'd be at absolutely no disadvantage as a History graduate plus GDL, than an LLB graduate. Statistically, approximately 50% of top firm lawyers went the GDL route.
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    (Original post by Bubbles*de*Milo)
    I know, but if you know from the offset that you want to be a lawyer, logic dictates you study law.
    Disagree. Personally I would love to be a lawyer. I am fully aware of all GDL/senior-status routes to entering the legal profession, and have the full backing of my father (and LLB graduate himself). Yet, i'm studying a degree in Civil Engineering due to my passion for the natural sciences and mathematics. I could still become a lawyer via the GDL/senior-status route.

    I'm also a massive step ahead of LLB graduates should I opt for patent law.

    EDIT: And yes. I have always kept the legal profession as a primary, realistic option.
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    (Original post by sleekchic)
    Not necessarily.

    If you know from the offset that you want to be a lawyer, but you also know that you will find a law degree boring, why put yourself through 3 years of hell when you could be studying something more interesting?

    I personally don't think it's boring but a lot of people on my course do and I can't help wondering why you would want to study something that isn't interesting when there are other routes into the career.
    This is what I dont get why do the top law firms except this nonsense. All this whole conversion course crap tells me is that either you are not as passionate at law as the straight law graduates or that you simply weren't good enough to do an undergraduate law degree. I'm so but law students have to go through so much crap with every law school requiring you to get AAA, the ***** that is the LNAT, not to mention the fact that Law is one of the most academically rigorous courses. Why should I get chosen over some prick who got ABB and so decided to do politics
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    (Original post by RBarack)
    Disagree. Personally I would love to be a lawyer. I am fully aware of all GDL/senior-status routes to entering the legal profession, and have the full backing of my father (and LLB graduate himself). Yet, i'm studying a degree in Civil Engineering due to my passion for the natural sciences and mathematics. I could still become a lawyer via the GDL/senior-status route.

    I'm also a massive step ahead of LLB graduates should I opt for patent law.

    EDIT: And yes. I have always kept the legal profession as a primary, realistic option.
    Isn't Civil Engineering more of a vocational degree? Why not study NatSci (you could do maths, physics, biology, Chemistry, astronomy, computer science, archaeology - anything you want) instead? Surely a lot of what you're learning that is engineering specific is only useful as technical knowledge for that profession?
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    (Original post by Bannage)
    This is what I dont get why do the top law firms except this nonsense. All this whole conversion course crap tells me is that either you are not as passionate at law as the straight law graduates or that you simply weren't good enough to do an undergraduate law degree. I'm so but law students have to go through so much crap with every law school requiring you to get AAA, the ***** that is the LNAT, not to mention the fact that Law is one of the most academically rigorous courses. Why should I get chosen over some prick who got ABB and so decided to do politics
    1. Not every law school requires you to get AAA. Unlesss of course you mean that only the good law schools require you to get AAA, which is obviously bull and very debateable.

    2. The LNAT is not that bad and even then it's only one aspect of the application process and not every law school uses it. Cambridge and Exeter spring to mind/

    3. 'Law is one of the most academically rigorous courses' That is again debateable. Where does maths come into it or medicine or a languages degree (yes these are rigorous)?

    4. Since when are A-level grades a good measure of intelligence?

    5. If that 'daft prick' has better EC's than you do, has a better degree class than you and has done very well on the GDL, then why on earth shouldn't he be picked over you?

    6. The conversion 'crap' doesn't prove that you are not as passionate as someone studying a law degree. It's simply a way of opening up the legal field and ensuring that people can do the degree they want and still go into the career they want.

    7. I put it to you the GDL is more not less, but more academically rigorous than a 3 year law degree. The GDL involves learning all 7 core modules in 1 year as opposed to a law degree that allows you to learn the 7 modules over 3 years. You only need to ask any GDL student and they will tell you.
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    (Original post by protectthecats)
    Hi,

    I want to be a lawyer and have been advised that the best way to do this is to do a degree in something else first and then a law conversion course as employers like this. Is this true?

    Apparently it shows that you are more versatile. I want to do a history degree but I am worried that this would not be what employers want maybe?

    Is a history degree and then a law conversion course a good move?

    thank you
    Law firms across the spectrum are just going to judge people on ability, not on any particular route an applicant takes. Besides, what makes you think an undergraduate reading law isn't 'versatile'? I'd have thought a law degree demanded significant versatility myself!
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    (Original post by Notker)
    Isn't Civil Engineering more of a vocational degree? Why not study NatSci (you could do maths, physics, biology, Chemistry, astronomy, computer science, archaeology - anything you want) instead? Surely a lot of what you're learning that is engineering specific is only useful as technical knowledge for that profession?
    You know far too little about engineering to claim that.

    EDIT: Plus, engineering graduates are favourites for patent law. I'm particularly interested in patent law.
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    (Original post by RBarack)
    You know far too little about engineering to claim that.

    EDIT: Plus, engineering graduates are favourites for patent law. I'm particularly interested in patent law.
    Considering my dad is a marine engineering officer in the navy, and, of course, has an engineering degree I don't think I'm entirely ignorant.
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    I've worked in a Solicitors where some of them had degrees ranging from History to Music - and the managing partner told me he actually preferred it when they had a degree in something like English/History/etc.
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    (Original post by Notker)
    Considering my dad is a marine engineering officer in the navy, and, of course, has an engineering degree I don't think I'm entirely ignorant.
    So what? You still have the engineering knowledge of a fish.
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    (Original post by RBarack)
    So what? You still have the engineering knowledge of a fish.
    So, you think that during the 22 years I have known my father he has never spoken about engineering, his degree, et cetera?
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    (Original post by Notker)
    So, you think that during the 22 years I have known my father he has never spoken about engineering, his degree, et cetera?
    Quote from what you said earlier:

    "Surely a lot of what you're learning that is engineering specific is only useful as technical knowledge for that profession?"

    Uhh, no.
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    I think that if you would only do the History degree in order to seem more attractive, don't do it. If you think law will interest you more, do that! Law firms do still employ people who have studied law. It happens

    Similarly, I havea question of my owm: I have been advised by a few people (with specific experience) that if I study Scandinavian Studies (or German) and then do a law conversion course I would not be short of jobs. Right now, I think I'd be more interested in teaching at a University or working for a Museum/a cultre organisation - something in academia. However, I feel very strongly about the environment (as I know many people do) and was wondering if it would be a good or a bad idea to do a law conversion course after Uni so that I open my options up. I wouldn't really want to do business or family law or anything like that - environmental or, if something else, working for an organisation such as Amnesty International.

    As is apparent, I know very little about law as yet. So... Opinions?
 
 
 
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