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    i'm having problems including relevant language points into my essay plan about sentimental love in pride and prejudice/merchant of venice and cold mountain.

    i was just wondering if anyone could give me any starting points/facts for me to work off.

    i know austen doesn't use any symbolism and relies on dialogue over description to bring her characters to life however i'm finding it hard not to make tenuous links when relating them to the way sentimental love is portrayed between darcy/lizzy + jane/bingley
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    I haven't studied the book, but I'll have a go. Sorry if this gets a bit muddled... tv is distracting me.

    (Original post by Jfranny)
    i'm having problems including relevant language points into my essay plan about sentimental love in pride and prejudice/merchant of venice and cold mountain.

    i was just wondering if anyone could give me any starting points/facts for me to work off.

    i know austen doesn't use any symbolism and relies on dialogue over description to bring her characters to life however i'm finding it hard not to make tenuous links when relating them to the way sentimental love is portrayed between darcy/lizzy + jane/bingley
    Regarding the bold section: I wouldn't go quiteeee that far - there are many symbols of wealth, for example, in the stately homes, furniture, etc. Language analysis here may be particularly enlightening when looking at characters such as the Bingley sisters, Lady Catherine de Bourgh and Mr Collins - does the language of these characters suggest a deeper level of materialism than that of the 'lovers'? Why? Consider sentence structure (and thus where any stresses in the sentence lie), repetition of ideas (repetition of sentence structure is a device used particularly by Mr Collins when discussing the pricing of Lady C de B's housing!) ... having said all this, I'm fully aware that your focus is love and not wealth and so...

    - How does the language of Elizabeth/Jane/Bingley differ from the language of Collins/Lady C de B? Why does Bingley's language make him seem a more sympathetic figure? Consider the tentative language of Bingley vs. the certain, unwavering and imposed opinions of Lady C.

    - There are lots of contrasting opinions surrounding Mr Darcy (as considered by Elizabeth at Bingley's party) - what is the effect of this 'unreliable narration'? Or, at least, uncertain narration? Is the reader more receptive to characters of whom the speaker's opinion seems fixed, or does the reader respond more readily when there is a question over someone's reputation? (That's not very clear is it? ) What I mean is... Elizabeth is very determined in her opinion of Mr Collins, Lady C de B, Mr Bingley and his sisters, but not of Mr Darcy - Darcy is the only one whose character isn't so... overt to her - she is very tentative in her description of him. So, tentativity vs. decisiveness in language seems to be a device used heavily by Austen - maybe it's something you could explore?

    - Aside from the effects of wealth, walking is another key metaphor and catalyst in P&P. Various characters (particularly Colonel Fitzwilliam) also act as catalysts - although these aren't example of language analysis, they are structural devices, which sorta come under the same bracket. In relation to your theme - what changes does Fitzwilliam's 'interference' catalyse?

    - Parallel language use - people in relationships often mirror each other's language, picking up words and reusing them - I believe that Darcy and Elizabeth do this in the scene where they admit their feelings (but my brain is slightly influenced by the film at this point :P. Anyway, the most intimate scenes should have examples of this.


    Anyway, sorry if this doesn't all seem relevant, but hopefully it will give you a few ideas.

    Feel free to PM/quote me if you want me to clear anything up. I'll have a think and see what else I can come up with on reflection.
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    (Original post by Aaymee)
    I haven't studied the book, but I'll have a go. Sorry if this gets a bit muddled... tv is distracting me.



    Regarding the bold section: I wouldn't go quiteeee that far - there are many symbols of wealth, for example, in the stately homes, furniture, etc. Language analysis here may be particularly enlightening when looking at characters such as the Bingley sisters, Lady Catherine de Bourgh and Mr Collins - does the language of these characters suggest a deeper level of materialism than that of the 'lovers'? Why? Consider sentence structure (and thus where any stresses in the sentence lie), repetition of ideas (repetition of sentence structure is a device used particularly by Mr Collins when discussing the pricing of Lady C de B's housing!) ... having said all this, I'm fully aware that your focus is love and not wealth and so...

    - How does the language of Elizabeth/Jane/Bingley differ from the language of Collins/Lady C de B? Why does Bingley's language make him seem a more sympathetic figure? Consider the tentative language of Bingley vs. the certain, unwavering and imposed opinions of Lady C.

    - There are lots of contrasting opinions surrounding Mr Darcy (as considered by Elizabeth at Bingley's party) - what is the effect of this 'unreliable narration'? Or, at least, uncertain narration? Is the reader more receptive to characters of whom the speaker's opinion seems fixed, or does the reader respond more readily when there is a question over someone's reputation? (That's not very clear is it? ) What I mean is... Elizabeth is very determined in her opinion of Mr Collins, Lady C de B, Mr Bingley and his sisters, but not of Mr Darcy - Darcy is the only one whose character isn't so... overt to her - she is very tentative in her description of him. So, tentativity vs. decisiveness in language seems to be a device used heavily by Austen - maybe it's something you could explore?

    - Aside from the effects of wealth, walking is another key metaphor and catalyst in P&P. Various characters (particularly Colonel Fitzwilliam) also act as catalysts - although these aren't example of language analysis, they are structural devices, which sorta come under the same bracket. In relation to your theme - what changes does Fitzwilliam's 'interference' catalyse?

    - Parallel language use - people in relationships often mirror each other's language, picking up words and reusing them - I believe that Darcy and Elizabeth do this in the scene where they admit their feelings (but my brain is slightly influenced by the film at this point :P. Anyway, the most intimate scenes should have examples of this.


    Anyway, sorry if this doesn't all seem relevant, but hopefully it will give you a few ideas.

    Feel free to PM/quote me if you want me to clear anything up. I'll have a think and see what else I can come up with on reflection.
    that's brilliant i can't thank you enough for taking the time to reply, really thanks alot you've given me a different perspective, thanks!!
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    you're going to be annoyed at me for this, but my coursework is on P+P and Mrs Dalloway and the importance of class in relationships so...
    *subscribes*
    when I'm actually working on my cwk, I'll see if I have anything relevant to contribute !
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    You could comment on Austen's use of letters........as Lizzy and Darcy are brought together from a number of letters...........the letter from Darcy and also the one from Mrs Gardener.... (Austen portrays sentimental love through letters in the novel....)
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    Without appearing to be a complete retard.. could you please expand on your metaphor - walking point...
    like just give me one example..
    I can't seem to think of what you mean, I know the book and the Colin Firth 1995 BBC version really well if you can give rough examples of it from either of them
    rep available :yep:
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    (Original post by annab1684)
    Without appearing to be a complete retard.. could you please expand on your metaphor - walking point...
    like just give me one example..
    I can't seem to think of what you mean, I know the book and the Colin Firth 1995 BBC version really well if you can give rough examples of it from either of them
    rep available :yep:
    Can you rep me again, though, so soon? (It was me on your "which book should I use for my coursework?" thread :p:)

    Regarding walking...
    Well, walking becomes a metaphor for movement in an emotional sense, as well as in a physical one. A lot of major decisions/revelations are made whilst walking:
    - Jane is sent to Netherfield on horseback (outdoor transportation, at least... you get the idea), leading to basically the rest of the novel
    - Elizabeth walks to Netherfield, causing her skirt to become all dirty and such, but revealing a softer side of Darcy who is .. something like "rendered uncommonly affected by the brilliance of her eyes" ... "brightened by the exercise" or some such.
    - Fitzwilliam and Lizzy are walking (I believe) when she hears of what Darcy has done in the separation of Bingley and Jane.
    - Lizzy and Darcy are walking when they confess their feelings at the end (they go walking twice, I think).
    ....... At the time, it would seem, walking was one of the best methods for securing intimate conversation (along with dancing) and so it is natural that Austen would use it as a plot device. It may be helpful to watch the extras on the film version of P&P (Keira, not Colin ) as it has some really interesting special features which may help one/both of you!

    Hope this helps :/ Again, I'll have a bit more of a think when I can. :woo:
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    (Original post by Aaymee)
    Can you rep me again, though, so soon? (It was me on your "which book should I use for my coursework?" thread :p:)

    Regarding walking...
    Well, walking becomes a metaphor for movement in an emotional sense, as well as in a physical one. A lot of major decisions/revelations are made whilst walking:
    - Jane is sent to Netherfield on horseback (outdoor transportation, at least... you get the idea), leading to basically the rest of the novel
    - Elizabeth walks to Netherfield, causing her skirt to become all dirty and such, but revealing a softer side of Darcy who is .. something like "rendered uncommonly affected by the brilliance of her eyes" ... "brightened by the exercise" or some such.
    - Fitzwilliam and Lizzy are walking (I believe) when she hears of what Darcy has done in the separation of Bingley and Jane.
    - Lizzy and Darcy are walking when they confess their feelings at the end (they go walking twice, I think).
    ....... At the time, it would seem, walking was one of the best methods for securing intimate conversation (along with dancing) and so it is natural that Austen would use it as a plot device. It may be helpful to watch the extras on the film version of P&P (Keira, not Colin ) as it has some really interesting special features which may help one/both of you!

    Hope this helps :/ Again, I'll have a bit more of a think when I can. :woo:
    the majority of important events happen whilst a character's on a journey too
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    (Original post by annab1684)
    Without appearing to be a complete retard.. could you please expand on your metaphor - walking point...
    like just give me one example..
    I can't seem to think of what you mean, I know the book and the Colin Firth 1995 BBC version really well if you can give rough examples of it from either of them
    rep available :yep:
    The number of journeys actually required also emphasises how difficult it was to develop any relationship due to the impracticalities of travel for families such as the Bennets.
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    (Original post by Aaymee)
    The number of journeys actually required also emphasises how difficult it was to develop any relationship due to the impracticalities of travel for families such as the Bennets.

    it would appear you are right,
    I have to wait for 17 days, nevertheless, you'll get your rep!
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    (Original post by annab1684)
    it would appear you are right,
    I have to wait for 17 days, nevertheless, you'll get your rep!
    You are very kind!

    Edit: I would rep back, but with only 70 posts or so, it is worthless for the time being.
 
 
 
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