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Question about one's CV, when applying for a postgrad watch

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    Is it necessary to include your long term career goals on your CV?

    Right now I'm ambitious but, in terms of thinking 10 years ahead, quite nebulous and idealistic. I just know that I have to study this subject (evolutionary psychology) as it fascinates me like nothing else, and I'll cross the bridge that follows, when I get to it.
    I vaguely feel that I would like to end up as some mix of doing writing, researching, and/or teaching, or all of the above. But I have nothing concrete, I keep vascillating. I want to make good decisions.

    So, I'm putting together my CV right now, and I'm hitting a wall... can I be vague? Can I bypass it? Can I focus only on the reasons why I'd be a great student?
    I suppose the universities want to know that you are a good prospect not just for grades but for job success afterwards.

    Any thoughts or advice?
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    I didn't and put my long term career goals on my personal statement instead, showing how the course would help achieve them.
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    (Original post by tigermoth99)
    I didn't and put my long term career goals on my personal statement instead, showing how the course would help achieve them.
    Doh!
    I assume most postgrad appliers will have to include their personal statement along with their CV?
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    I don't think you need to worry about that. The people who will assess your application don't expect you to be able to carve your future carrer on a stone right after graduating, they just want to make sure that you have enough ambition not to drop the course half-way through your degree. The kind of job you describe sounds close to academia though, I would suggest writing something like "considering an academic career" or something similar.
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    (Original post by PrimateJ)
    Doh!
    I assume most postgrad appliers will have to include their personal statement along with their CV?
    Er... yeah, you don't want to send your application without a personal statement. :naughty: It doesn't need to be long, I think one page is just fine.
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    (Original post by PrimateJ)
    I suppose the universities want to know that you are a good prospect not just for grades but for job success afterwards.
    I doubt it. I would've thought that universities would love to have students that are interested in doing a postgraduate degree purely because they enjoy what they're learning. Although it's inevitable that a lot of successful applicants will use a postgraduate course as a stepping stone for a career in the private sector, uni's would like students who would be willing to stay on at the university as researchers or teachers, compared to those pissing off to the city to earn a ****load of cash. IMO.

    Your CV won't look that impressive if you don't have much work experience but I doubt that'd matter for postgrad applications (or suitability to the course).
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    A CV is about what you have done, not about your future aspirations, hopes plans etc.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    A CV is about what you have done, not about your future aspirations, hopes plans etc.
    It's just that I opened up a sample CV (one of the first results on google), and it included a section "Career Objective/Summary".

    But I suppose I could focus on the "summary" side of that, for now.
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    Frankly that's usually utterly meaningless, or self evident, or works against the application you are making. Same as telling a 16 year old to put a 'profile' in. It is however an easy use of lines for any careers advisor, less work for them to do extracting useful, relevant skills from people. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    Frankly that's usually utterly meaningless, or self evident, or works against the application you are making. Same as telling a 16 year old to put a 'profile' in. It is however an easy use of lines for any careers advisor, less work for them to do extracting useful, relevant skills from people. :rolleyes:
    Sorry, I don't quite get you. Which post were you responding to?
    Excuse my retardation.
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    (Original post by PrimateJ)
    Sorry, I don't quite get you. Which post were you responding to?
    Excuse my retardation.
    I was referring to the opening 'career objective' or 'profile' in a CV. The only relevant form of profile is for an employer who needs to slot a certain type of person into a team (ie a thinker, do-er, leader, standards maintainer etc) and the person writing the CV has years of evidence that they can put into a headline summary. Otherwise it is just three to five lines of irrelevant waffle.

    Saying generic things like I am a bright, enthusiastic worker who is keen to take the initiative etc etc is meaningless because it is an opinion about yourself and no-one would ever say anything else. No-one would write I'm bright and well qualified but I'm not really any use before lunchtime and I'm pretty poor at timekeeping....

    So unless you are summarising specific skills the employer is looking for, and then the rest of the CV provides evidence for those skills, the whole section in meaningless and just wastes space.
 
 
 
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