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Studying your degree simply for the pleasure of it watch

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    What are your thoughts on this: I want to enter the world of writing and journalism. I know that I don't need a specific degree in journalism for this to happen, and I know that getting a PHD would be superfluous IF it only was with the aim of "breaking into journalism".

    My point is that, I love a certain subject (evolutionary psychology), and I'd like to study it at an advanced level, and also I think it would be great to have this background when "breaking into" journalism, even though it's not essential. So, is it so wrong to want to study something at an advanced level just for the pleasure of it, even though it may not be essential to your overall future career?

    Edit: I already have a degree, by the way. So I'm talking about postgrad level.
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    No, it's absolutely the right thing to do. I think it's completely wrong to choose a career path and then decide on a degree that you think might help you get there; instead, do what you love and it'll always lead somewhere. Moreover, you'll always do better at what you enjoy (I'm at Cambridge doing psychology, sociology and politics but could never have got in for, say, law, since I just don't have a corresponding love for it).

    Go for it.
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    Most definitely do it. You'll be far more successful in a subject you love and are interested in than one you took just to play it safe.

    That's what I'm doing, much as it's unusual. :dontknow:
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    (Original post by PrimateJ)
    What are your thoughts on this: I want to enter the world of writing and journalism. I know that I don't need a specific degree in journalism for this to happen, and I know that getting a PHD would be superfluous IF it only was with the aim of "breaking into journalism".

    My point is that, I love a certain subject (evolutionary psychology), and I'd like to study it at an advanced level, and also I think it would be great to have this background when "breaking into" journalism, even though it's not essential. So, is it so wrong to want to study something at an advanced level just for the pleasure of it, even though it may not be essential to your overall future career?
    Im doing a psychi nursing diploma just for the challenge/ experience of it and to get a bit of respect from people (everyone thinks im lazy/useless) I don't actually fancy the idea of working on wards Im not a peoples person. I think it will help me to get an health promotion specialist career or something similar.
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    Definitely a good idea. It actually opens up more in the field of journalism for you, so it's beneficial as well as pleasurable for you! For example if you wanted to do scientific journalism, a degree in a scientific subject will provide you an entry-level consideration straight away
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    (Original post by PrimateJ)
    So, is it so wrong to want to study something at an advanced level just for the pleasure of it, even though it may not be essential to your overall future career?
    No.

    Next pointless question: Is it wrong to drink some water if you're thirsty?
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    (Original post by goodLife)
    Im doing a psychi nursing diploma just for the challenge/ experience of it and to get a bit of respect from people (everyone thinks im lazy/useless) I don't actually fancy the idea of working on wards Im not a peoples person. I think it will help me to get an health promotion specialist career or something similar.
    :no:
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    That was the original point of going to univeristy. Its a fairly new idea to go to uni to get a job later on.
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    The common way to get into journalism is to have great subjects and to study English at Cambridge

    Personally I'd only do a PHD if I was rich and bored, or if I wanted to become a university lecturer. Doing one in ones twenties seems to be rather pointless 'for the fun of it'. Then again, there's no arguing about taste.
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    I have no idea what I want to do after uni so yes, I suppose at the moment I'm just studying my subject for the plesure of it (well, I will be).
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    Yep me. I'm considering doing a PhD in Russian history purely because I love it.
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    I certainly haven't chosen to do what I've applied for to earn loads of money. In fact, lots of people say languages are useless, and Italian being moreso because its not spoken outside Italy, while Spanish and French etc. are universal almost.

    I've applied because I enjoy it.
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    What's wrong with that? I've no reason to be doing Maths beyond liking it. I haven't a clue what to do after, I'd be much better off to go earn some money really.
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    (Original post by Overmars)
    No.

    Next pointless question: Is it wrong to drink some water if you're thirsty?
    Not entirely pointless to be honest. As the old saying goes, and it is very fitting for me to say this but, everything has a price. It's all very well doing a degree for the love of it, and far more people should adopt this view, but it is becoming increasingly out of date. I had a meeting with an academic at my university (Durham) and I cringed when he quoted that, by attending university I have a higher probability of earning a higher salary upon graduation. I wouldn't have minded that statement as such but he knew of me before as I asked for feedback for an interview for a junior research fellowship as I didn't get it, so I can put it right if there is a next time. University staff need to stop assuming that their universities are a passport to work and that, shock horror, some of us really are enthusiastic over our subject.
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    (Original post by Ham22)
    well this is pretty much what im doing, sincewhen i finish i will be almost as unemployable as before i started.
    I know the system is quite messed up if someone takes the time and their own money to study something for 3 years they should at least be rewarded with a guaranteed job of some sort at the end of it.
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    Thanks for the replies.

    I should have added the question: Can I justify (or sell) to the interviewers/course directors my love for the subject as a good reason to study it in itself?
    Again, I'm talking about a masters/postrgard if that matters (?)

    (Original post by d123)
    Yep me. I'm considering doing a PhD in Russian history purely because I love it.
    Xorosho, comrade!
 
 
 
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