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Umass Amherst for postgrad? watch

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    So i know I want to do postgrad, probably a masters. I also would like to move to Boston/Massachusetts. So if I apply for a number of different unis for a masters course, im thinking of also applying to Umass. Im currently in my second year studying politics, and would be interested in doing a masters in political theory. So does anyone know anything about Umass Amherst? Also is it usually possible to apply for a course and defer entry for a year to do work?

    Thanks
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    UMass. AKA ZooMass for the insane partying that goes on there. I don't really know that much about UMass post grad. However, I can say that Amherst is a great college town. It's geared very much towards the students. It's about 2 hours from Boston.

    UMass is also part of the Five Colleges. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Co...(Massachusetts)

    ^ It is basically a partnership between the 5 colleges in the Amherst area. Students can take classes at any of the colleges, buses run between all of the various colleges, dances are held for all the colleges, etc. The 5 members are UMass Amherst, Amherst College (the #1 ranked Liberal Arts college in the US), Hampshire College, Mount Holyoke College (all female), and Smith College (again, all female).
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    The consortium is irrelevant for graduate students, as courses at the other colleges are not at the graduate level.

    U Mass offers a MA in political science, but there is NO funding available for such students. Unless you're willing to make the commitment to a PhD program, reconsider your options.


    Graduate programs in the US are very different from those in the UK. The purpose of graduate school is to turn out researchers, which is the main reason many programs only accept applicants for the PhD. Furthermore, fit is an extremely important part of a graduate application. When applying, you have to write a personal statement, which is essentially a two page document explaining what you've studied, what you want to study, and why and with whom you want to study at U Mass specifically. If the faculty don't think you're a good fit for the department, you WILL be rejected, regardless of how amazing an applicant you are.

    Location very rarely plays a role in selecting graduate programs. I can assure you that western Tennessee was not exactly where I planned to move after graduation, but there are only half a dozen universities that offer my program, so I go where it's available. Similarly, you should be more focused on selecting a university that fits your needs, not which city looks the nicest on wikipedia -- unless your goals are more focused around life in the US than around graduate education, in which case you should reconsider graduate school altogether.
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    (Original post by devil09)
    The consortium is irrelevant for graduate students, as courses at the other colleges are not at the graduate level.

    U Mass offers a MA in political science, but there is NO funding available for such students. Unless you're willing to make the commitment to a PhD program, reconsider your options.


    Graduate programs in the US are very different from those in the UK. The purpose of graduate school is to turn out researchers, which is the main reason many programs only accept applicants for the PhD. Furthermore, fit is an extremely important part of a graduate application. When applying, you have to write a personal statement, which is essentially a two page document explaining what you've studied, what you want to study, and why and with whom you want to study at U Mass specifically. If the faculty don't think you're a good fit for the department, you WILL be rejected, regardless of how amazing an applicant you are.

    Location very rarely plays a role in selecting graduate programs. I can assure you that western Tennessee was not exactly where I planned to move after graduation, but there are only half a dozen universities that offer my program, so I go where it's available. Similarly, you should be more focused on selecting a university that fits your needs, not which city looks the nicest on wikipedia -- unless your goals are more focused around life in the US than around graduate education, in which case you should reconsider graduate school altogether.
    This year ive been studying democratic theory, political philosophy and political economy. Next year ill be studying protest and dissent in democratic society and probably more democratic theory. When i checked over the faculty list several UMass academics specialise in those sorts of areas.

    In terms of location yeh i do realise that, and im currently looking for postgrad programmes in the UK and in the US, although in terms of the US i would rather keep to the new england area.
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    (Original post by Jaager)
    This year ive been studying democratic theory, political philosophy and political economy. Next year ill be studying protest and dissent in democratic society and probably more democratic theory. When i checked over the faculty list several UMass academics specialise in those sorts of areas.

    In terms of location yeh i do realise that, and im currently looking for postgrad programmes in the UK and in the US, although in terms of the US i would rather keep to the new england area.
    NOOOOOOO GO 2 SLEEP
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    (Original post by sk007_644)
    NOOOOOOO GO 2 SLEEP
    Um WTF??
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    (Original post by Jaager)
    This year ive been studying democratic theory, political philosophy and political economy. Next year ill be studying protest and dissent in democratic society and probably more democratic theory. When i checked over the faculty list several UMass academics specialise in those sorts of areas.
    As long as faculty there work in your areas of interest (and are accepting grad students), then you should be good to go. Assuming, of course, that finances are not an issue.

    My previous post inadvertently came off as a bit irritated, but I really do think many UK students have misguided ideas about graduate admissions in the US, and most have not bothered to check out the faculty as you have. Universities like NYU, USC, and Boston U are in highly coveted cities, and although their graduate programs are relatively weak and probably aren't good fits for the vast majority of applicants, the competition for them is incredibly intense.


    Given your interests, Northeastern and Brandeis might also be of interest to you.

    http://www.polisci.neu.edu/graduate/
    http://www.brandeis.edu/departments/...ate/index.html
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    (Original post by devil09)
    As long as faculty there work in your areas of interest (and are accepting grad students), then you should be good to go. Assuming, of course, that finances are not an issue.

    My previous post inadvertently came off as a bit irritated, but I really do think many UK students have misguided ideas about graduate admissions in the US, and most have not bothered to check out the faculty as you have. Universities like NYU, USC, and Boston U are in highly coveted cities, and although their graduate programs are relatively weak and probably aren't good fits for the vast majority of applicants, the competition for them is incredibly intense.


    Given your interests, Northeastern and Brandeis might also be of interest to you.

    http://www.polisci.neu.edu/graduate/
    http://www.brandeis.edu/departments/...ate/index.html
    Thanks! Ill definately check out Northeastern.

    Also is it the norm that MA programmes recieve no funding?
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    Depends on the program and the school. I was lucky enough to have my MA funded, but many others in my program weren't.

    Usually schools that ONLY offer MA degrees in a certain field (e.g. Tufts) are more likely to give funding. These are called "terminal master's" programs and are often used as back-up options for applicants rejected from PhD programs.
 
 
 
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