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    How do I figure how many proton peaks there are in each of these compounds? I don't get it?
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    For the second one - because the carbon is attached to a carbon bonded to 3 hydrogens, and using the n+1 rule. If you notice, the other carbons it's attached to aren't bonded to any hydrogens; only to other carbons and bromine.
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    (Original post by Waterstorm)
    For the second one - because the carbon is attached to a carbon bonded to 3 hydrogens, and using the n+1 rule.
    But it's attached to another carbon with 6 hydrogens no?
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    (Original post by Get Cape.Wear Cape.Fly.)
    But it's attached to another carbon with 6 hydrogens no?
    No, read what I added when I edited my post. It's attached to a carbon, and those carbons are attached to hydrogens, so they don't count for that part.
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    CHCH_3

    The CH carbon is a quartet because of the splitting due to the neighbor methyl group. n+1 rule?
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    Ohhh ok, thanks. What about the first question? I have no clue how to do that?
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    (Original post by Get Cape.Wear Cape.Fly.)
    But it's attached to another carbon with 6 hydrogens no?
    Ah, this has actually made it clearer to understand.. From the way im looking at it... On the left of that carbon, it is attached to a carbon with no hydrogens..

    but on the right of the carbon, its attached to a carbon with 3 hydrogens, and using the n + 1 rule, it = 4.. its split by neighborouging protons..
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    Btw, hows your med application going?
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    (Original post by Haz Shah)
    Ah, this has actually made it clearer to understand.. From the way im looking at it... On the left of that carbon, it is attached to a carbon with no hydrogens..

    but on the right of the carbon, its attached to a carbon with 3 hydrogens, and using the n + 1 rule, it = 4.. its split by neighborouging protons..
    But how do I figure how many hydrogen environments there are?
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    (Original post by Get Cape.Wear Cape.Fly.)
    Ohhh ok, thanks. What about the first question? I have no clue how to do that?
    You need to identify the amount of equivalent hydrogens, as they will all appear at the same chemical shift.

    From there you can decide the splitting from the adjacent Hydrogens.
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    (Original post by gilbo)
    You need to identify the amount of equivalent hydrogens, as they will all appear at the same chemical shift.

    From there you can decide the splitting from the adjacent Hydrogens.
    Is that how I figure how many hydrogen environments there are? What are equivalent hydrogens?
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    Is this in anticipation of Edexcel chemistry tomorrow? In which case, I'm absolutely epicly going to fail.
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    (Original post by LeChat)
    Is this in anticipation of Edexcel chemistry tomorrow? In which case, I'm absolutely epicly going to fail.
    no
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    I've done the first one for you, I hope you can work the rest from there.
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    oh ok good stuff
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    (Original post by gilbo)
    I've done the first one for you, I hope you can work the rest from there.
    Thanks....so every carbon with hydrogens is a different environment?

    (except if it's symmetrical)

    does the last compound have 4???
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    (Original post by Get Cape.Wear Cape.Fly.)
    But how do I figure how many hydrogen environments there are?
    you look at the carbons attached to the neighboring carbons.. and if they are attached to Hydrogens, then that determines your peaks if you get me.. you don't look at the hydrogens on the actual carbon that you are looking at.. the peaks are due to neighbourging protons (hydrogens)
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    AQA Chemistry Unit 4?

    I'm doing the exam aswell tomorrow.
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    (Original post by Haz Shah)
    you look at the carbons attached to the neighboring carbons.. and if they are attached to Hydrogens, then that determines your peaks if you get me.. you don't look at the hydrogens on the actual carbon that you are looking at.. the peaks are due to neighbourging protons (hydrogens)
    Does the last compound have 4 hydrogen environments? :o:
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    (Original post by Get Cape.Wear Cape.Fly.)
    Thanks....so every carbon with hydrogens is a different environment?

    (except if it's symmetrical)
    No you can have equivalent environments. It depends on the bonding. If you look at the second example, the 2 methyl groups on the 'left' are equivalent.
 
 
 
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