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    After being boiled, can bile still emulsify lipids?
    Will the effectiveness decrease? Why?

    Thanks,
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    I think so because it doesn't rely on enzyme activity
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    The lipase will be denatured.
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    If its anything to do with temperature, think enyzmes! if it is over their optimum temperature, they will work less effeciently and will denature.

    and is that one something to do with the pancreatic duct and juice?
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    Please read this article.

    http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5242225...emulsify_.html

    You can't just do a blanket ban on everything to do with temperature as some processes aren't by enzyme activity.

    Emulsification will still occur as the bile salts will still be present, the effectiveness may decrease as some lipase is also involved in the process but not exclusively.

    EDIT: Typo.
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    surely bile will still emulsify the lipid...bind them into small droplets, but the lipase enzyme will be denatured so the lipid droplets will not be broken down.

    This was a long time ago so i don't really remember
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    surely bile will still emulsify the lipid...bind them into small droplets, but the lipase enzyme will be denatured so the lipid droplets will not be broken down.

    This was a long time ago so i don't really remember
    Finally someone with sense that can back me up

    Teaching in schools is so robotic these days.. "Temperature... THINK ENZYMES"
    Not always the case.
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    (Original post by Haz Shah)
    Nope, because as soon as enzymes reach above their optimum temperature, they start to denature.. their active site changes, so that it would not be specific to break down and emulsify the lipid.. and therefore, the active site would not be able to fit the tertiary shaped substrate.
    Wow did you copy that straight from a ******* mark scheme. Moron.
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    (Original post by gilbo)
    Wow did you copy that straight from a ******* mark scheme. Moron.
    I concur... what's happened to A-level education...
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    (Original post by gilbo)
    Finally someone with sense that can back me up

    Teaching in schools is so robotic these days.. "Temperature... THINK ENZYMES"
    Not always the case.
    Yaaaay I'm actually useful
    I completely agree with you on the robotic teaching method thing. I was taught the same way but when I used that sort of mentality at College/Uni those shortcuts didn't get me anywhere.

    You have the seriously think about the processes and how temp, pH, concentration and inhibitors affect your end result. Oh and I hate how a low temperature is said to 'denature'...NO it DOESN'T it merely slows the process down!!

    Ok rant over.

    I think teaching was better when I was younger, when my bro/sis are doing their GCSEs/A-Levels now its just so basic. Regurgitating text and methods won't help them learn if a new question arises. :mad: Well unless you have initiative and common sense....which schools are not sculpting in todays' kids.
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    Forgive me if I'm wrong but I think the original question has been misunderstood.

    The question asked can boiled bile salts still emulsify lipids? No-one mentioned boiling the lipase. So for example would a solution of lipids with boiled bile salts and lipase react in the same way as a solution of lipids with (unboiled) bile salts and lipase? If they react differently why? (Assume the temperature and pH is the same for both.

    I'm trying to answer the same question and would be grateful for any help!

    Thanks
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    We have been doing this experiment at school (I'm a technician) and have found that bile salts boiled for 5 mins plus unboiled lipase works faster than unboiled lipase plus unboiled bile salts. We can'ty understand this at all! Any ideas? We have repeated the experiment.
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    (Original post by Farsight)
    We have been doing this experiment at school (I'm a technician) and have found that bile salts boiled for 5 mins plus unboiled lipase works faster than unboiled lipase plus unboiled bile salts. We can'ty understand this at all! Any ideas? We have repeated the experiment.
    Did you allow the bile salt solution to return to room temperature before adding it to the reaction mixture?
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    Yes we did allow it to cool down. I tried it again today and think that within the bounds of experimental error the results for boiled were about the same as unboiled. The first result we got was about twice as fast but I am wondering if someone added too much lipase! I'm beginning to think that boiling bile does not not make any difference when used in conjunction with lipase
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    (Original post by Farsight)
    Yes we did allow it to cool down. I tried it again today and think that within the bounds of experimental error the results for boiled were about the same as unboiled. The first result we got was about twice as fast but I am wondering if someone added too much lipase! I'm beginning to think that boiling bile does not not make any difference when used in conjunction with lipase
    Sounds like it was just a procedural error the first time There shouldn't much of a difference.
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    Yes I think you're right. Thanks for the help.
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    thank you very much, but many others I know have got same results and hence REV mIke, you may not be right
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    The lipase will be denatured.
    Bile isn't a lipase.
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    mrt23498 are you saying that others have found the reaction with unboiled lipase and boiled bile works slightly faster that the unboiled version of both? The end point isn't that easy to spot.
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    (Original post by Farsight)
    mrt23498 are you saying that others have found the reaction with unboiled lipase and boiled bile works slightly faster that the unboiled version of both? The end point isn't that easy to spot.

    yes, I'm not sure why, but I am in a class of 30 students, the teachers and the technicians in my school have found that the unboiled lipase and boiled bile salts is quicker than the unboiled both
 
 
 
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