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biting point after clutch change watch

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    hello, just had my clutch changed today and my biting point is different from what im used to.

    before i could lift the clutch pedal 3 to 4 inches upto the biting point, however now that ive had my clutch changed this has fallen to about 2 to 3.

    is this normal?
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    Yes. The clutch plates are thicker now so the bite point is lower. It's like if you change the brake pads on a bike (theoretically, you can set them up differently though) then you don't need to pull the brake lever as far to brake.
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    Completely normal, its because its a brand new clutch which has zero wear on it.

    As a clutch wear, it takes longer for the plates to come together which means your biting point gets higher. When you get a new clutch, the pads are at full width and the biting point is lower.

    On normal driving you don't notice at all but when a significant changes, you do!
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    Yes this is normal when you get a new clutch. As your clutch gets used more the biting point will change (it has to do with how the clutch works... basically I believe it gets worn down as it gets used, so the biting point changes).
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    ok kool thanks guys, only disappointment is i paid £330 to get it done.

    i need to be a mechanic cos £55 an hour for labour is better than being a economist lol.
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    Damn straight dude! It is daylight arse rape.
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    That £55 doesn't go to the mechanic. It goes on the garage bills, water, electric heating etc. Gloves for the mechanic, rags, granules for spillages etc.

    As you change gear in a car, the clutch wears on the flywheel and clutch diaphragm plate. Over time this will change the bitting point as the thickness decreases causing the clutch plate to move further.

    A new clutch is about 10mm thick, when the clutch is changeded they can be down to 3mm.
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    (Original post by waliur)
    hello, just had my clutch changed today and my biting point is different from what im used to.

    before i could lift the clutch pedal 3 to 4 inches upto the biting point, however now that ive had my clutch changed this has fallen to about 2 to 3.

    is this normal?
    this is a good thing no need to worry.
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    (Original post by dantheman09)
    That £55 doesn't go to the mechanic. It goes on the garage bills, water, electric heating etc. Gloves for the mechanic, rags, granules for spillages etc.

    As you change gear in a car, the clutch wears on the flywheel and clutch diaphragm plate. Over time this will change the bitting point as the thickness decreases causing the clutch plate to move further.

    A new clutch is about 10mm thick, when the clutch is changeded they can be down to 3mm.
    Thanks dude, I would never have got this far without you!

    Damn expensive electricity and the costs for rags are extortionate!

    At work, we get rags by the tonne, and they cost like £100/tonne. It is just old, discarded clothes.

    I think it is safe to say, that 95% goes to the company in profit.
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Thanks dude, I would never have got this far without you!

    Damn expensive electricity and the costs for rags are extortionate!

    At work, we get rags by the tonne, and they cost like £100/tonne. It is just old, discarded clothes.

    I think it is safe to say, that 95% goes to the company in profit.
    No, it isn't, electricity is expensive and also, bear in mind the tools required, premesis rent etc, it all adds up!
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    (Original post by chriscpritchard)
    No, it isn't, electricity is expensive and also, bear in mind the tools required, premesis rent etc, it all adds up!
    Its not that expensive mate, I am not going to get into an argument about it, but if your overheads are costing you over 10% of your costs then you are in trouble.

    Tools, once you have them should last years.

    Rent is fair enough.

    The biggest cost for the garage is always going to be the mechanic who does the work, and that is where the majority of the labour costs goes on...labour.
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    (Original post by dantheman09)
    That £55 doesn't go to the mechanic. It goes on the garage bills, water, electric heating etc. Gloves for the mechanic, rags, granules for spillages etc.

    As you change gear in a car, the clutch wears on the flywheel and clutch diaphragm plate. Over time this will change the bitting point as the thickness decreases causing the clutch plate to move further.

    A new clutch is about 10mm thick, when the clutch is changeded they can be down to 3mm.
    If your clutch is wearing on your flywheel you have problems...... there are 2 opposing clutch plates, if you wear one of them through then you'll be wearing out the fly. In normal, well maintained operation though, the clutch and flywheel dont interfere or touch.
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    I thought it could have been a different setting with the clutch cable and how tight it was, is this a factor and would they change the cable too when replacing the clutch?
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    (Original post by Riderz)
    If your clutch is wearing on your flywheel you have problems...... there are 2 opposing clutch plates, if you wear one of them through then you'll be wearing out the fly. In normal, well maintained operation though, the clutch and flywheel dont interfere or touch.

    The clutch assembley is bolted onto the flywheel. Inside the assembly is a friction plate which touches the the flywheel and clutch diaphragm. When the clutch pedal is pressed it pulls on the release fork which is pivotted. This intern pushes on the release bearing on the clutch diaphragm, this pushes on the springs in the diaphragm forcing the clutch friction plate to dis-engage with the flywheel and allow the driver to change gear.

    When the pedal is then released the friction plate re-engagges with the flywheel and allows the uptake of power to the gearbox.
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    what part did you change?
    Your "clutch" consists of loads of parts.
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Thanks dude, I would never have got this far without you!

    Damn expensive electricity and the costs for rags are extortionate!

    At work, we get rags by the tonne, and they cost like £100/tonne. It is just old, discarded clothes.

    I think it is safe to say, that 95% goes to the company in profit.
    My work spends millions each year or consuambles, tools etc etc. It all adds up
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    (Original post by mr_cool)
    My work spends millions each year or consuambles, tools etc etc. It all adds up
    Oh for **** sake.

    Its not hard.

    Man's technical skilled labour Vs Overheads.

    You are seriously arguing that overheads are more expensive?!

    On board ship, we carry over £50 million just in spare parts, but the people that work on it cost a lot more than that per year!
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Oh for **** sake.

    Its not hard.

    Man's technical skilled labour Vs Overheads.

    You are seriously arguing that overheads are more expensive?!

    On board ship, we carry over £50 million just in spare parts, but the people that work on it cost a lot more than that per year!
    We opearte at a loss as a company and dont charge labour being in the public sector.

    Im not saying the labour prices are totally jusified, but some people tend to quickly forget about overhead costs when they complain how much people charge.
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    (Original post by mr_cool)
    We opearte at a loss as a company and dont charge labour being in the public sector.

    Im not saying the labour prices are totally jusified, but some people tend to quickly forget about overhead costs when they complain how much people charge.
    Ah the public sector, that does explain the extortionate prices and it costing millions in tools and stuff. Suppliers do love to rip off the public sector, thereby shooting themselves in the foot!

    Overhead costs are very very minimal in comparison to how much goes to the mechanic(s) or any skilled labour.

    Same in any profit making organisations. Of course this rules out loss making public sector straight away which is a money pit and dead end stop for any useless accountant incapable of getting a good deal!
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    Back to the point, my car is laid up because I cant get it in gear, the bite point got lower and lower until zero. I have had over the past two years a new master and slave cylinder. Wil a new clutch restore the bite point to NORMAL or are there other pats I need to look at
 
 
 
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