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    Found this interesting article:

    In the earlier post, I explain that, by the American standards, all British newspapers are tabloids because they don’t distinguish between what is true and what they make up. I knew this from my own experiences of dealing with British journalists, but, as it turns out, even the British government admits, in an official government publication, that British newspapers make things up and report them as facts.

    Most British people consider the Times of London to be the most respectable “broadsheet” newspaper. Last week, the Sunday Times published an article with the headline “Blonde women born to be warrior princesses.” The article reported that “Researchers claim that blondes are more likely to display a “warlike” streak because they attract more attention than other women and are used to getting their own way – the so-called “princess effect.”” The Times article quotes the evolutionary psychologist at the University of California – Santa Barbara, Aaron Sell, and his findings are purportedly published in his article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    As it turns out, however, none of this is true, as Sell explains in his angry letter to the Times. He and his coauthors do not mention blondes at all in their paper and they don’t even have hair color in their data. The supplementary analysis that Sell performed after the publication of the paper, as a personal favor to the Times reporter, show the exact opposite of what the Times article claims. After he presumably listened to Sell explain all of this on the phone, the Times reporter nonetheless made up the whole thing, and attributed it to Sell.
    I'm surprised we put up with this kind of thing in our tabloids, never mind our supposed 'respectable' papers.

    The rest of the article is interesting as well- read it here.
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    I hardly believe anything I read these days - a lot of the time even if the story has some truth in it, the journalist can easily be biased in the way they report the story.

    The same goes for advertising - what a joke that is! Every single hair/makeup advert is touched up to the max or "filmed with lash inserts"! **** off and just show me what I'm actually getting for my money.
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    When did Psychology Today become a press heavyweight? It is a petty whinge by a petty scientist in a field that seems to exist only to produce coffee table books and minor newspaper headlines. Evolutionary psychology appears to have cultivated an ardent relationship with headline writers of late, so I suppose it is inevitable that the relationship would easily turn sour. He takes one minor example where one newspaper made one mistake, (but a costly mistake, because it was one that misrepresented the field of evolutionary psychology!) and turns it into a stupid transatlantic generalisation of which the moral appears to be "Yes, the British press may be freer than their American counterparts, but freedom equals lies".

    His previous article is even worse.
    In the US, something newsworthy happens and newspapers rush to the incident (literally and figuratively) to be the first one to report it. In the UK, newspapers make things up and hope that enough readers will believe them and they eventually become true in their minds.
    The worst problem in that latter article is where he takes a quote a booklet given to immigrants as part of their education before a citizenship test:

    The UK has a free press, meaning that what is written in newspapers is free from government control. Newspaper owners and editors hold strong political opinions and run campaigns to try and influence government policy and public opinion. As a result it is sometimes difficult to distinguish fact from opinion in newspaper coverage.
    and provides the insightful analysis:

    In other words, you can’t believe what you read in British newspapers presented as facts. It is difficult to imagine that the US State Department would publish an official statement similar to this about the American newspapers.
    It is inexplicable that he can somehow turn that into governmental backing of his stupid argument. In other words, one should exercise critical judgement when reading something in the press. Presumably this chap believes that the greater controls on the American press are responsible for removing all political bias from newspaper reporting.

    I don't think anyone would disagree that press reporting can leave something to be desired in terms of its neutrality and interpretation of events, or even misrepresentation of sources to improve a story, but to equate greater freedom of the press in the UK compared to the USA (N.B. A Good Thing) with:

    it is their job as British journalists to make things up. They don’t care if it’s true or not
    is questionable 'journalism' in itself.
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    I don't really read newspapers or magazines any more, if I do I take it with a grain of salt because they all have their own agenda and make up a lot of things to sell. They act like real life trolls these days.
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    (Original post by Spinnerette)
    I don't really read newspapers or magazines any more, if I do I take it with a grain of salt because they all have their own agenda and make up a lot of things to sell. They act like real life trolls these days.
    I'd hesitate to claim that the manipulation of information is a recent phenomenon.
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    (Original post by RyanT)
    I'd hesitate to claim that the manipulation of information is a recent phenomenon.
    I agree with you it's not a recent claim but their journalism is little to be desired even the top newspapers.
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    the sun news paper were ment to do an artical on my mum years ago about her being one of the first women in the uk to have an operation to remove breast tissue before cancer formed because she was so high risk and they took a photo of me, when we opened the paper it was a 2 page spred pic of me saying how even tho i was 15(at the time) i was going to have the oparation at 16 we got some much abuse off people saying it was discusting that my mum wud let me do it and that wasnt the truth at all i will never believe what i read in papers !
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    http://tabloid-watch.blogspot.com/20...ng-factor.html I find that report far scarier.
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    This may be true, but American newspapers no longer exist.
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    News is entertainment. I'm not sure if news was ever an unbiased, factual account of what's happened but it definitely isn't now. It's a shame that the public at large are deceived on such a monumental basis as it precludes any meaningful debate on the world around us by virtue of the fact that all of the content is so selective and stage-managed in it's presentation. Some of this is purposefully done for ulterior motives yet I fear even more it is largely a case of incompetence and laziness (things we all have within ourselves to varying degrees) on behalf of reporters. I turn the news on and all's I see is a bunch of insincere people trying to get their 15 minutes, interviewing people who are having their 15 minutes. Say what you like about politicians, but I find them infinitely less patronising and obtuse than some of the so-called journalists I am forced to endure in trying to stay on top of 'current affairs.'
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    (Original post by bikipip)
    Newswipe by Charlie Brooker covered this the other night
    There's new newswipe?!
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    Newspapers love to make things up... easy stories, lazy journalists - a lethal combination. (especially when those stories are provided by PR companies, wahoo no research needed!)

    Also, can I just say that the Express' cartoonist has done an interesting photorealistic piece.... : (warning, despite being on the Express, 'nsfw' and all that: http://www.express.co.uk/cartoon/view/2010-01-28)
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    I've always known they make a lot of things up and I take everyhing I read with a grain of salt. It just annoys me that there are so many people that will believe any tabloid trash they read..
 
 
 
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