Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Pupils complaining about "Unfair" exam paper watch

Announcements
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8480563.stm

    I think this campaign set up by the students is ridiculous. I know I've come out atleast of one of my GCSE/a-level exams thinking 'we didn't do that in class' but then realising that- it was touched on, but it was my responsibility to also learn it.

    The whole point of a-levels is to promote an independance and different approach to your learning, to take responsibility for it. If a teacher doesn't cover a topic- big deal! You go and make sure what you need to learn for yourself, those who were spoon fed students at school now struggle in the first semester at university, complain about 'but the lecturer only spent 5 minutes on that topic, what are we going to do?' - how about go and do your own work?!
    Another huge part of a-levels, is also collaberating your knowledge as a whole, and coming up with more detailed and analytical answers- thinking outside the box, putting 2 and 2 together- yes so the questions may not have been about directly what they were taught, but i'm ready to bet a huge part of it was linked in, and they had to use their brains to answer it!

    If the exam board looked at it, agreed that the questions covered the specification- and i'm sure the exam standards board (can't remember the name!) will look into it and also come up with the conclusion


    What does everyone else think about this? to sum up, i think on the students part its very petty and immature
    if a pupil has been spoon fed (ie, taught to always think inside the box) from the tender age of 4 by the education system, how are they supposed to be independent when they hit 16/17/18? I think you're a bit out of touch..

    And actually, the whole point of college is that its a stepping stone to university. Its meant to channel your decision regarding what you really want to do at university. it is not a place of true independent study.

    I also think that most students are upset not because of the content of the exam - its most likely because they've been assured they will get A's and B's (now theres a good chance they won't get them), but more importantly they've got it in their heads that they will definitely have the grades to go to uni. Now thanks to this one exam asking questions that were different from what teachers told them would most likely be in the exam, it jeopardises their university place entirely! so of course you're going to cause a massive fuss!

    I can't say i really agree with the way our education system works, but the above is sort of the reality of it all
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MSB)
    It's very handy that so many important stories are significantly related to Facebook, so that journalists do not have to leave their offices.
    Expansion of modern media you idiot. would you prefer it was all conducted on horse back? And blast those DAMN those recording devices, what happened to parchment and quill?? x
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    ive not. if you look at the exam paper, then the specification, all questions are from the spec and are related to the a-level learning. I think the issue here is some students got confused and thrown off by the examples used, but the point of the questions was definitely related to the spec
    Have you done the exam then? I thought you were a nursing student.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    Have you done the exam then? I thought you were a nursing student.

    I've seen the exam paper
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    I've seen the exam paper
    How?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    How?

    theres a link in the thread a few pages back, and the specification can be seen on the AQA website
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    theres a link in the thread a few pages back, and the specification can be seen on the AQA website
    Ah ok.

    Even still, there is a line where questions either become relevant or tenuous at best. It seems that this exam falls heavily under the latter category, and I don't really think that's appropriate for an A-level examination.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    er no there wasn't...it was a question about the use of statistical tests in general and was only 2 marks
    I stand corrected. But still, if it says in the book you will not be tested on something in an exam, you shouldn't be tested on it. That's just unfair.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SpamBa)
    I stand corrected. But still, if it says in the book you will not be tested on something in an exam, you shouldn't be tested on it. That's just unfair.

    well they weren't tested on spearmans rank, but the use of statistics, possibly discussing uses of tests to increase reliabilty to results, applied to general population..it's a collaboration of knowledge, which the specification discusses.

    It is very easy to focus on one aspect of a question, especilly at A2 and feel thrown, and i learnt the hard way you have to see out of the box to see what they're asking you

    for example, one question asks the candidate to discuss the use of a glue, begininning with f, and its advantage in the practical described. It's not asking the candidate to give knowledge about this glue, but give knowledge from the example given above, and apply that with research design
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    They're petty whiners but if it makes exam boards begin to think that they should just write the papers based on the bloody syllabus then they're heroes. We should all do it, exam boards have been getting away with their duplicitous sadism for too long.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doyle&TheFourFathers)
    if a pupil has been spoon fed (ie, taught to always think inside the box) from the tender age of 4 by the education system, how are they supposed to be independent when they hit 16/17/18? I think you're a bit out of touch..

    And actually, the whole point of college is that its a stepping stone to university, not a place of true independent study.

    I also think that most students are upset not because of the content of the exam - its most likely because they've been assured they will get A's and B's, but more importantly they've got it in their heads that they will definitely have the grades to go to uni. Now thanks to this one exam asking questions that were different from what teachers told them would most likely be in the exam, it jeopardises their university place entirely! so of course you're going to cause a massive fuss!
    The person you're arguing with is still at uni (as am I) and we were expected to be able to think outside the box and do certain amounts of independent learning with the guidance of our teachers at A-level. If we were 2-4 years ago then why on earth should people not have to now? This paper is very similar to what we had to do and as we got into uni on the back of being able to do such things then people applying to the same courses at uni now should also be able to do it. If they can't then they are at a disadvantage and will struggle even more with the transition.

    If kids are being told 'you will get such and such a grade' then educational standards have fallen a great deal. It should not be a set thing at all, predictions are just that - predictions of what you could achieve given your ability and the amount of work you have been known to put in. If people think they will fall short of uni requirements then they should work harder in the last set of modules to make up for it, not expect AQA to lower the boundaries!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    Ah ok.

    Even still, there is a line where questions either become relevant or tenuous at best. It seems that this exam falls heavily under the latter category, and I don't really think that's appropriate for an A-level examination.

    I disagree, for an A2 exam especially, the questions are fair enough. If you see my previous posts, the EXAMPLES given are not on the specification, but what the questions asked about the examples are- so the textbook may not have used said examples, but this is the point of an exam, especially at A2 level
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by little_penguin)
    The person you're arguing with is still at uni (as am I) and we were expected to be able to think outside the box and do certain amounts of independent learning with the guidance of our teachers at A-level. If we were 2-4 years ago then why on earth should people not have to now? This paper is very similar to what we had to do and as we got into uni on the back of being able to do such things then people applying to the same courses at uni now should also be able to do it. If they can't then they are at a disadvantage and will struggle even more with the transition.

    If kids are being told 'you will get such and such a grade' then educational standards have fallen a great deal. It should not be a set thing at all, predictions are just that - predictions of what you could achieve given your ability and the amount of work you have been known to put in. If people think they will fall short of uni requirements then they should work harder in the last set of modules to make up for it, not expect AQA to lower the boundaries!
    if anything the new specifications are promoting applied thinking and learning more than our a-levels did a while ago. Yes I wasn't expected to learn what wasn't on the specification, but i was expected to understand how the science i was taught could be applied in the real world, or in a variety of settings, and not everything expected of me was learnt in a classroom environment. My teachers always told us they're not teachers anymore, but tools in our own learning- we use them when we feel we need their help.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8480563.stm

    I think this campaign set up by the students is ridiculous. I know I've come out atleast of one of my GCSE/a-level exams thinking 'we didn't do that in class' but then realising that- it was touched on, but it was my responsibility to also learn it.

    The whole point of a-levels is to promote an independance and different approach to your learning, to take responsibility for it. If a teacher doesn't cover a topic- big deal! You go and make sure what you need to learn for yourself, those who were spoon fed students at school now struggle in the first semester at university, complain about 'but the lecturer only spent 5 minutes on that topic, what are we going to do?' - how about go and do your own work?!
    Another huge part of a-levels, is also collaberating your knowledge as a whole, and coming up with more detailed and analytical answers- thinking outside the box, putting 2 and 2 together- yes so the questions may not have been about directly what they were taught, but i'm ready to bet a huge part of it was linked in, and they had to use their brains to answer it!

    If the exam board looked at it, agreed that the questions covered the specification- and i'm sure the exam standards board (can't remember the name!) will look into it and also come up with the conclusion


    What does everyone else think about this? to sum up, i think on the students part its very petty and immature
    It's just another typical case of people not being to take responsibility for themselves and blaming other people or institutions.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Lol.
    So A-levels suddenly require you to do more than write out a memorized model answer and students get pissed. Eejjit
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joseph90)
    It's just another typical case of people not being to take responsibility for themselves and blaming other people or institutions.

    I agree! :yep:

    I got loads of neg rep last night now everyone seems to be of a degree of agreement at some point
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by little_penguin)
    The person you're arguing with is still at uni (as am I) and we were expected to be able to think outside the box and do certain amounts of independent learning with the guidance of our teachers at A-level. If we were 2-4 years ago then why on earth should people not have to now? This paper is very similar to what we had to do and as we got into uni on the back of being able to do such things then people applying to the same courses at uni now should also be able to do it. If they can't then they are at a disadvantage and will struggle even more with the transition.

    If kids are being told 'you will get such and such a grade' then educational standards have fallen a great deal. It should not be a set thing at all, predictions are just that - predictions of what you could achieve given your ability and the amount of work you have been known to put in. If people think they will fall short of uni requirements then they should work harder in the last set of modules to make up for it, not expect AQA to lower the boundaries!
    I agree with you entirely, its just that i was trying to describe what the education system has become since you left college (believe it or not it has changed quickly! :p: )
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by iamtheanswer)
    That exam was ridiculous! 7 out of the 8 questions required you to interpret some sort of graph or table, and question 7 had about 12 parts to its. i came out of the exam thinking i had done ok, but that i needed none of my knowledge. This is why OCR is the best exam board, they ask you direct question.
    remember, theres no smoke without fire.
    Eh. I always thought AQA was easiest and OCR was the most difficult.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    I disagree, for an A2 exam especially, the questions are fair enough. If you see my previous posts, the EXAMPLES given are not on the specification, but what the questions asked about the examples are- so the textbook may not have used said examples, but this is the point of an exam, especially at A2 level
    OK, that sounds reasonable.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Muffinz)
    Eh. I always thought AQA was easiest and OCR was the most difficult.

    back in the day when i did a-levels, i had to do edexcel SNAB...now that exam is in a league of its own
 
 
 
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: January 27, 2010
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.