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    If a human hits a dog with intent to hurt or even kill, and the dog retaliates viciously by biting and scarring the person for life. Could the person file a complaint and demand that the dog be put down?

    Let's say there were a few witnesses close by, who saw exactly what happened and are willing to testify.
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    hopefully not

    people who abuse animals are scum
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    I would hope the dog bites their throat out.
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    Wouldn't there have to be proof first, as in the defendant attacked the dog to lodge a defense?
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    Would the dog be put down though if it was hit first and scarred the person due to self-defence?
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    (Original post by john87)
    hopefully not

    people who abuse animals are scum
    Pity I haven't heard of any ALF members go lynching animal torturers.
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    (Original post by Stalin)
    Would the dog be put down though if it was hit first and scarred the person due to self-defence?
    what did you assault a dog or something?
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    (Original post by john87)
    what did you assault a dog or something?
    No, it's about my dog.
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    If I recall correctly, the crimes regarding dangerous dogs are about keeping them under proper control. In order words, you can have a dangerous dog so long as you keep it under appropriate control given its nature.

    If a dog bites someone who is obviously harassing it, then it cannot really be said that the owner allowed the dog to be out of his control. It is a natural and understandable response.

    It's not so much about the dog being destroyed - but about the criminal responsibility of the owner. The law treats putting a dog down as something of sideline to the main responsibility of the person in charge of it.

    To some extent, the old 'one bite rule' still applies too. You can pretty much let a dog do what it likes if you believe it not to be dangerous. If it then bites someone - at least under normal circumstances - you have established it can be dangerous and have to take reasonable precautions to prevent it causing harm.
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    (Original post by Stalin)
    No, it's about my dog.
    Someone tried to kill your dog?
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    (Original post by L i b)
    If I recall correctly, the crimes regarding dangerous dogs are about keeping them under proper control. In order words, you can have a dangerous dog so long as you keep it under appropriate control given its nature.

    If a dog bites someone who is obviously harassing it, then it cannot really be said that the owner allowed the dog to be out of his control. It is a natural and understandable response.

    It's not so much about the dog being destroyed - but about the criminal responsibility of the owner. The law treats putting a dog down as something of sideline to the main responsibility of the person in charge of it.
    My dog isn't dangerous, nor is it an illegal breed.

    Let's say, I wasn't present, let's say someone else was walking my dog and someone, out of the blue, decided to hurt my dog, could the person's complaint be taken seriously? And could the person walking my dog, my dog or myself be held responsible for the incident?

    Moreover, if the person was aggressive towards it and/or taunting it. Again, would the person's complaint be taken seriously if my dog defended itself?
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    (Original post by Wild_Precious_Life)
    Someone tried to kill your dog?
    No, not at all, I'd just like to know, in the event of someone being aggressive towards my dog and hurting it, would my dog would be allowed to defend himself?

    Now a dog is not a human, and wouldn't take an attack lightly, if anything it would turn into a killing machine, which is why I'd like to know if the law changes at all, when it comes to dogs, or any domestic animal for that matter.
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    (Original post by Stalin)
    My dog isn't dangerous, nor is it an illegal breed.

    Let's say, I wasn't present, let's say someone else was walking my dog and someone, out of the blue, decided to hurt my dog, could the person's complaint be taken seriously? And could the person walking my dog, my dog or myself be held responsible for the incident?
    In regard to the responsibility angle, both the owner and the person with the dog can be held responsible. It is a proper defence for an owner to show that he believed he had left the dog in the hands of a decent enough person who'd take care of it properly - then it becomes solely the responsibility of that person.

    If your dog isn't out of control and isn't in any way dangerous then no, you haven't committed a crime. You haven't even been negligent in any way - firstly, no-one has any right to hurt your dog; secondly, if someone was to decide to hurt a dog, it'd be their responsibility to take precautions against harm and injury and thirdly no court in the land is going to use its discretion to order that a perfectly good dog be killed - the newspapers would have a field day.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    In regard to the responsibility angle, both the owner and the person with the dog can be held responsible. It is a proper defence for an owner to show that he believed he had left the dog in the hands of a decent enough person who'd take care of it properly - then it becomes solely the responsibility of that person.

    If your dog isn't out of control and isn't in any way dangerous then no, you haven't committed a crime. You haven't even been negligent in any way - firstly, no-one has any right to hurt your dog; secondly, if someone was to decide to hurt a dog, it'd be their responsibility to take precautions against harm and injury and thirdly no court in the land is going to use its discretion to order that a perfectly good dog be killed - the newspapers would have a field day.
    Alright, lastly. Imagine that someone taunts my dog, and my dog attacks him, under my surveillance, is the legal aspect of it all any different?
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    (Original post by Stalin)
    Alright, lastly. Imagine that someone taunts my dog, and my dog attacks him, under my surveillance, is the legal aspect of it all any different?
    In any case getting the evidence is key, without it the APO's/police/Crimestoppers can't really do much. Perhaps they'd have to ensure it's not a banned dog under the DDA (or any other dangerous dog) then gather evidence of any previous attack by the dog...if that was unavailable and there were witnesses to confirm that someone had actually provoked your dog then I don't think there's much they could do tbh.
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    (Original post by Wild_Precious_Life)
    In any case getting the evidence is key, without it the APO's/police/Crimestoppers can't really do much. Perhaps they'd have to ensure it's not a banned dog under the DDA (or any other dangerous dog) then gather evidence of any previous attack by the dog...if that was unavailable and there were witnesses to confirm that someone had actually provoked your dog then I don't think there's much they could do tbh.
    My dog has never bitten anyone, he has no record and no he's not banned. But say, someone taunted my dog, and my dog mauled the person and scarred him/her for life. Would my dog and/or I be at fault? Let's say there were a few witnesses around.
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    (Original post by Stalin)
    My dog has never bitten anyone, he has no record and no he's not banned. But say, someone taunted my dog, and my dog mauled the person and scarred him/her for life. Would my dog and/or I be at fault? Let's say there were a few witnesses around.
    Technically the dog isn't at fault but it's a grey area with animal behaviour. I know of a neighbour's dog nearby who recently got put down, some chavs were throwing stones at it and taunting it....the poor dog had never hurt a soul in the past and was just protecting itself, the dog acted in self defense, biting this chav and scarring one of the guys (not sure how severe the scars were) and the result was the dog having to be put down. Everyone here was so angry especially as people knew what these chavs were like.
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    (Original post by Wild_Precious_Life)
    Technically the dog isn't at fault but it's a grey area with animal behaviour. I know of a neighbour's dog nearby who recently got put down, some chavs were throwing stones at it and taunting it....the poor dog had never hurt a soul in the past and was just protecting itself, the dog acted in self defense, biting this chav and scarring one of the guys (not sure how severe the scars were) and the result was the dog having to be put down. Everyone here was so angry especially as people knew what these chavs were like.
    That's the likeliest of scenarios, however if anyone dared to taunt or attack my dog, I'd maul the person myself and make sure he/she was permanently disabled for life, as I'd have more chance of getting away with it than my dog. However as I'm leaving for university in September, my dog will be in the hands of my younger siblings and I can't help but wonder, as one of them is 12, what my dog's reaction would ever be like if someone were to taunt him or my siblings. He'll also be fully grown by that time and already packs a ridiculous amount of strength for a 5 month old French Spaniel, I'll admit it's not the most ferocious dog in the world, and I'm willing to bet that you were expecting a German Shepherd or something of the sort, but he's got some strength. He'll be a lot bigger than the dog in the picture as he's crossed with a Brittany Spaniel and he isn't white, he's more of a mixed brown and white colour, it's hard to explain.

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    Animal self-defence is one of the things I've never quite understood, I was talking about it with my dad tonight, explaining that one of my sister's friends hit my dog, not once but 3 times. Now, hit is a very exaggerated word as my sister's friend is only 7 years old, however there was a fair amount of contact but my dog didn't seem to care as he was playing with my sister, which is where it hit me, had my dog not have been focused on someone else, would he have taken this as an aggression towards him and how would he have reacted?
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    (Original post by Stalin)
    That's the likeliest of scenarios, however if anyone dared to taunt or attack my dog, I'd maul the person myself and make sure he/she was permanently disabled for life, as I'd have more chance of getting away with it than my dog. However as I'm leaving for university in September, my dog will be in the hands of my younger siblings and I can't help but wonder, as one of them is 12, what my dog's reaction would ever be like if someone were to taunt him or my siblings. He'll also be fully grown by that time and already packs a ridiculous amount of strength for a 5 month old French Spaniel, I'll admit it's not the most ferocious dog in the world, and I'm willing to bet that you were expecting a German Shepherd or something of the sort, but he's got some strength. He'll be a lot bigger than the dog in the picture as he's crossed with a Brittany Spaniel and he isn't white, he's more of a mixed brown and white colour, it's hard to explain.

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    Animal self-defence is one of the things I've never quite understood, I was talking about it with my dad tonight, explaining that one of my sister's friends hit my dog, not once but 3 times. Now, hit is a very exaggerated word as my sister's friend is only 7 years old, however there was a fair amount of contact but my dog didn't seem to care as he was playing with my sister, which is where it hit me, had my dog not have been focused on someone else, would he have taken this as an aggression towards him and how would he have reacted?
    Aww bless it! Some dogs may quickly nip back, even if it's good normally, some may fully attack the kid. It depends on the kid and the dog! In the future your parents shouldn't leave the dog alone with young children, they always ended up stepping on the dog's tail or provoking it somehow. Most dogs will nip back if they are in pain or provoked but if it's just spontaneous it's a different story. Questions need to be asked!
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    (Original post by Wild_Precious_Life)
    Aww bless it! Some dogs may quickly nip back, even if it's good normally, some may fully attack the kid. It depends on the kid and the dog! In the future your parents shouldn't leave the dog alone with young children, they always ended up stepping on the dog's tail or provoking it somehow. Most dogs will nip back if they are in pain or provoked but if it's just spontaneous it's a different story. Questions need to be asked!
    I've noticed that whenever he doesn't like something he nips back, but doesn't bite me, if you get what I'm saying, it's almost as if he waits for me to tell him, no.

    My dog's fine with my younger sister and her friends, because they give him a lot of attention, and to be honest, it's not as if she's in any danger, as the dog's been growing up with the family since he was a puppy.

    The ******* left me 5 little, brown, mushy cigars this morning, and looked at me as if I was supposed to be proud of him...
 
 
 
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