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    I am currently a junior in high school, but I know that if I want to get an LLB from certain schools in the UK I will have to take the LNAT.
    I guess I am just wondering how difficult it is, and whether it is sort of like an SAT test?
    Anyway, I am also confused because I read that one's UCAS registration must be completed before they take the LNAT, but if I decide to take the test June of my Junior year, surely my UCAS application will not be done.
    Then if I was to wait until my senior year to take the test, appointments would not be available until much later in the year, and it would be too late by then.

    Is this lack of appointments only at my testing center? Or is this the case with everyone?
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    You have to sit the LNAT in the admissions cycle you're applying in (i.e. I had to sit it between September 2009 and January 2010 because I applied between September 2009 and January 2010; as you're an international applicant, however, assuming no Oxford application, you'd have until June). Unfortunately that means there's no way to do it beforehand in case you get a good enough score not to retake as you can with the SATs/ACT, because your score is wiped clean and you have to retake if you decide take the test in a different admissions cycle.

    It's not really like the SAT at all, short of being multiple choice and having an essay. Critical reading is more like english comprehension, whereas the LNAT asks you to interpret arguments as opposed to their form. The closest American parallel would be the reading comprehension section of the LSAT. The sort of questions asked are "What was the writer's main argument?" or "What can be inferred from X?" etc. and the essay presents a proposition and you have to argue one way or the other.
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    (Original post by numb3rb0y)
    It's not really like the SAT at all, short of being multiple choice and having an essay. Critical reading is more like english comprehension, whereas the LNAT asks you to interpret arguments as opposed to their form. The closest American parallel would be the reading comprehension section of the LSAT. The sort of questions asked are "What was the writer's main argument?" or "What can be inferred from X?" etc. and the essay presents a proposition and you have to argue one way or the other.
    Interesting, thanks for the information! So I would aim to take the test most likely between Septemeber 2010 and January 2011.
    In my school, we would not take the LSAT until the end of senior year, but those questions seem alright. Maybe I will purchase a practice book.
    Part of me is not even sure whether taking the test is worth it. I have no idea how well I would do on the test, and even if I did take it, I do not know if I am even capable of getting into the schools that require it. I suppose it does not hurt to try.
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    (Original post by alygoots)
    Interesting, thanks for the information! So I would aim to take the test most likely between Septemeber 2010 and January 2011.
    In my school, we would not take the LSAT until the end of senior year, but those questions seem alright. Maybe I will purchase a practice book.
    Part of me is not even sure whether taking the test is worth it. I have no idea how well I would do on the test, and even if I did take it, I do not know if I am even capable of getting into the schools that require it. I suppose it does not hurt to try.
    I'd definitely recommend picking up a practice book, but before that try the example tests they have here: http://www.lnat.ac.uk/2009/preparation/practice.html

    Some people say practicing for the LNAT is useless, but I found I was able to get my average score up by ~5 by just working through sample tests from the website and the book. Check out the LSAT practice books, too; the Law School Admission Council publishes several books that are just 10 old LSAT exams, which work really well for practice even though only the reading comprehension section is relevant. In the end, though, as far as I'm aware only UCL and KCL publically admit to having a cut-off score (14 for KCL and 20 for UCL IIRC), so it's only one element in your application. If the rest is strong, it's not going to be a huge deal.
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    (Original post by numb3rb0y)

    Some people say practicing for the LNAT is useless, but I found I was able to get my average score up by ~5 by just working through sample tests from the website and the book. Check out the LSAT practice books, too; the Law School Admission Council publishes several books that are just 10 old LSAT exams, which work really well for practice even though only the reading comprehension section is relevant.
    This is extremely stupid but initially when you said LSAT, I thought you meant the Literature SAT II. I just looked up the LSAT now, and in America you need to take that for grad school, yet the LNAT is needed for an undergrad?
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    (Original post by alygoots)
    This is extremely stupid but initially when you said LSAT, I thought you meant the Literature SAT II. I just looked up the LSAT now, and in America you need to take that for grad school, yet the LNAT is needed for an undergrad?
    Yeah. The LSAT is for Juris Doctor admissions, but since you can study law as an undergraduate in the UK (and there are way more applicants with the right grades than there are places at the top law schools) they took the reading comprehension and essay parts of the LSAT, based the LNAT on them, and use that for undergrad admissions. The LSAT is harder in general, but the reading comprehension bit is more or less equivalent to the multiple choice section of the LNAT in my experience. That's why LSAT materials are so great for practice; it's been running for decades in America, so there's a bunch of old tests, whereas the LNAT has only been used for about five years.
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    (Original post by numb3rb0y)
    Yeah. The LSAT is for Juris Doctor admissions, but since you can study law as an undergraduate in the UK (and there are way more applicants with the right grades than there are places at the top law schools) they took the reading comprehension and essay parts of the LSAT, based the LNAT on them, and use that for undergrad admissions. The LSAT is harder in general, but the reading comprehension bit is more or less equivalent to the multiple choice section of the LNAT in my experience. That's why LSAT materials are so great for practice; it's been running for decades in America, so there's a bunch of old tests, whereas the LNAT has only been used for about five years.
    Wow thanks so much. Where did you apply?
 
 
 
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