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    (Original post by jibreal7)
    No, it shouldn't.
    For many women it is considered an essential part of their faith, so denying them the right to wear it, denies them their freedom and essentially denies them their human rights. Perhaps if people took the time to understand their religion more, instead of blindly accepting the zionist fuelled medias portrayal of it, they would see that it is in fact a religion of peace and justice.
    What does the burqa signify to you?
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    Yes, it represents supression and inequality. Something not compatible with GB.
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    (Original post by masta786)
    Of course not!!!:mad: :mad:

    Everyone has rights, we shud be able to wear what we lyk!!!
    It is part of Muslims faith and everyone has a right to believe in what they want.

    If you ban the veil why don't the government start banning eg turbans etc..

    :mad: :mad:
    Have you not listened? They want to partially ban it because it covers the face. Headscarves are part of a muslim's faith and they're not banning that.
    Moreover, when since has a complete body covering been considered an 'essential' part of the muslim faith? Tell me where in the Qu'ran it says that all women must wear the burqa. If it was so "essential" how come a vast majority of muslim women don't wear it?
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    (Original post by cardine92)
    People in Britain are stopped by the police for a lot of things. My friend was stopped twice in the same day for "walking quickly", which shockingly, people tend to do when they are trying to get to work. You see, the police here will have to use something called "common sense" which is something you may not be aware of. Now, despite my previous experiences with the police, they can tell the difference between someone who has just robbed a bank, an emo with a long fringe, and a devout muslim woman wearing a veil as she goes about her daily business.



    Let's ban halloween masks, surgeons masks, team mascot costumes, hooded tops, hats, scarves and the Catholic Church while we're at it huh.



    I know, that's what I said. Just because a holy book says something is OK doesn't make it so but I believe it should be up to individuals to choose what they do or do not wear, religious or not. As long as it doesn't impinge on anyone elses safety, which except for a few certain situations the veil does not. And besides, just because you can see someones face it doesn't somehow mean we're all safer, I know countless people who have got into clubs, been served and even gotten through airport security with other people's passports.



    Urm... yes? Making it a criminal offense to wear (or not) a piece of clothing is stupid.
    huh?
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    (Original post by Toxic Tears)
    How exactly have they shaped british society? And using your point ( as western society has shaped muslim societies even more so) it should mean that western women shouldn't be forced by some muslim states/countries to wear headscarves and other unwanted clothing. I believe in fairness. If muslim women want us to allow them to dress how they want in our countries then WE should also be allowed to dress how we want in their countries. For goodness sake, saudi arabia prevents many non muslims from entering their country for the sole reason that they are not muslim. Is this fairness/democracy?
    To answer your question fully about how Muslims have influenced society would lead to a rather long-winded answer which would digress from the OP, so I shall keep it short. Looking at it from an abstract viewpoint, separate from religion, one could argue any and every single person affects society, via their actions whether it be good or bad, large or small. If you want a literal answer, then in the fields of medicine, philosophy, mathematics etc Islamic scholars such as Ibn Sina (Avicenna) were major figures, whose work benefits both East and West today. There are vast quantities of examples which I would rather not have to list. It would be silly to not acknowledge the input of pre-Western societies to current Western society as even great individuals such as Newton recognise the work of others before them.

    Saudi Arabia to my knowledge do not claim to have a fully democratic government (?) If the UK tomorrow sets up a totalitarian government then I would agree with your argument, if Saudi make you do it there then reciprocate here. My point was that the UK claims to be a democratic society, and aggressively looks to set it up across the world, therefore this ban would be hypocritical.

    Plus, considering that I am British, what does it have to do with me what the officials in Saudi do? Just because we follow the same religion does not mean I can change their regulations. Do we only allow X-number of black people into the UK if they allow the same number of white people into Jamaica?
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    (Original post by Toxic Tears)
    You can't compare sideburns and a dot on the head to someone who conceals their entire body. It is not natural in a normal situation to do this as the body, especially the face is a vital means of communication in human society. Humans are naturally suspicious of what they cannot see and this covering causes problems in security situations as well as giving a message (intended or not) of hostility. There is NO reason why a woman should feel she needs to be bundled up out of sight, cut off from the rest of society with a cloth that must be a burden to day to day life in order to fulfil some arbitary 'modesty' requirement. I also don't like the reasoning behind the burqa. It is fundamentally unfair that muslim men are not subject to this - after all are men exempt from being modest? Religious debates aside, as others have pointed out, there are security issues and social issues that the burqa cause, just as people have to uncover their faces in certain situations, why should muslim women be exempt from this.
    Lots of things humans do aren't 'natural.' Just because it makes you and I uncomfortable or suspicious doesn't mean it ought to be banned.

    There is no logical reason why someone would want to dress up as a punk with a mohawk a couple of foot tall. Or why someone would want to dress up as a Goth and stand out from people who choose to dress as preps.

    Most Muslims don't believe the veil is compulsory. In actual fact it is a gulf custom. Orthodox standards for Muslim men can often be more difficult then Muslim women who wear just the hijab.

    Security issues need to be addressed. And they can be in ecrtain situation. However they cannot override the right of a woman to walk freely down the street in a veil or a mohawk or a dress made of black bin bags and cardboard.
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    Yeah, it's nothing more than Saudi colonialism on the streets of the UK.
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    (Original post by Cinematographic)
    Lots of things humans do aren't 'natural.' Just because it makes you and I uncomfortable or suspicious doesn't mean it ought to be banned.

    There is no logical reason why someone would want to dress up as a punk with a mohawk a couple of foot tall. Or why someone would want to dress up as a Goth and stand out from people who choose to dress as preps.

    Most Muslims don't believe the veil is compulsory. In actual fact it is a gulf custom. Orthodox standards for Muslim men can often be more difficult then Muslim women who wear just the hijab.

    Security issues need to be addressed. And they can be in ecrtain situation. However they cannot override the right of a woman to walk freely down the street in a veil or a mohawk or a dress made of black bin bags and cardboard.
    How so? It sometimes seems to me that muslim men like to dodge answering this question on why it's only women who are required to wear special body coverings whether it is the hijab or the burqa while they are happily exempt from such so called modesty requirements. So i'll ask you again, WHY is it so?
    I definitely believe that the burqa should not be worn in certain situations. How do you believe these security issues with the burqa should be addressed?
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    No. People should be able to choose to do what they want to do, as long as it harms no person or animal.
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    (Original post by kopi, ffs)
    No, they should be able to choose. Years of struggle, etc, etc, yes, but it's not our government's place to make them 'profit from their freedom' by restriktin' their rights. Besides, how many people does this actually affect? In France there was a massive storm about the burkha, and there are actually fewer than 2000 women in the land that wear them, so in effect it was just fuel for Islam extremists/reason for moderates to get riled up and alienated from French society, and an easy excuse for the government to claim they're doin' something about the problem.
    Whose problem is it then? People who bomb embassies because of cartoons or a country with a two hundred year tradition of liberty, equality, democracy and free speech?
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    (Original post by Toxic Tears)
    How so? It sometimes seems to me that muslim men like to dodge answering this question on why it's only women who are required to wear special body coverings whether it is the hijab or the burqa while men are exempt from such so called modesty requirements. So i'll ask you again, WHY is it so?
    Im a liberal Muslim man.

    Muslim women in Britain outside of the uber rich Saudis who frequent the west end tend to do so because they have bought into the fundamentalist wahabi interpretation of Islam. The veil is as much about their identity and making a statement about a form of Islam they have adopted as about a relative term like 'modesty'.

    Most orthodox Muslim women will just wear the basic hijab (covering just their hair) and usually wear western clothing. Orthodox Muslim men will in turn also grow a beard but are also likely more often to also adopt the full dress.

    At the end of the day it's as much to do with culture as modesty. In the UAE women wear a metal mask that resembles a beak rather than the veil. That's their tradition. I saw older women in the Gulf who wore that while there daughters/granddaughters were head to toe in the rather expensive designer western clothing without even the basic head covering hijab. So obviously such stark differences in single families had as much to do with culture as religion in the gulf.

    The reverse is as i said true in say the UK where the older generation parents/grandparents would never have worn the veil, but their children in contrast choose to do so.
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    are women banned from wearing nothing but a bikini?
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    (Original post by Joseph90)
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8481617.stm



    Yes.

    I believe arabs are unnecessary. and they don't belong in British society. Some women may want to wear it but I only see it as a restriction and an impairment on all women who wear it.

    It disputes a value that women worked hard to fight for tens of years ago and I abhor it.




    What do you think?


    Yes.

    It's a safety hazard as it hides the person's identity. And I also believe it degrades women. So I'd be for the ban. :yep:
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    (Original post by adamrules247)
    Yes, it represents supression and inequality. Something not compatible with GB.
    Whereas Christianity represents.........
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    I believe it should NOT be banned.

    I disagree with the whole concept of the face veil (burkha). I find no advocation for the face veil nor the head scarf for women in the Quran.

    However I believe that people should have the freedom to wear whatever they want. I know some people say that the face veil doesn't fit into British society, and I agree, it doesn't but they must have the freedom to wear it.
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    (Original post by @mmaad)
    are women banned from wearing nothing but a bikini?
    No. Its' legal to wear it in public. It would probably be looked at as quite weird though.

    Of course in (most) workplaces it's probably not appropriate attire.
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    (Original post by Lefty Leo)
    Whose problem is it then? People who bomb embassies because of cartoons or a country with a two hundred year tradition of liberty, equality, democracy and free speech?
    Forgiv but I don' quite understand what you're askin'. The "national identity"/immigration/laicity question is the problem of everyone in the society. But the burkha isn't a national issue.. claim that it's an issue to do with pressure from families and kommunities on women, I accept, but it's not anything that government should be legislatin' about imo.
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    Sure, some people wearing the burqa/niqab make me feel a bit worried/apprehensive. However, so do some people with giant stretched-with-a-fleshtube earholes.

    But I tolerate them. Because A, nothing they ever do or say will hurt me/affect me a great deal. And B, this is a country that values the ethos of freedom of speech and expression (although it's starting to get weird), and me being a born citizen of this country, means I subscribe to this these rules.

    However, sometimes the wearing of the niqab/burqa will have a marked negative effect upon others or the wearers themselves in a certain situation or surrounding. If this is the case, for example if a teacher wearing the burqa/niqab wishes to teach in a mixed-sex surrounding, where the pupils may be too young to understand the reasons for her wearing it, or where it is seen as menacing and harmful, then it should be made very clear that her wearing the burqa is incompatible with this desire, and to explain the reasons why in a calm and respectful manner.

    And last time I checked, there was absolutely nothing wrong with dressing modestly and wearing the hijab.

    Another practice that should be resolutely outlawed is the forcing of the garment upon those to young to understand its implications, and indeed forcing it upon anyone. However, there is a real danger of adopting a guilty-until-found-innocent attitude towards the male figures in the lives of those who choose to wear it.

    But ultimately, if you choose to wear it, have the sense to recognise that it's not gonna be welcome everywhere. And don't start whining "They're racist blah blah blah"

    So yeah, banning it is stupid.
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    (Original post by kopi, ffs)
    Forgiv but I don' quite understand what you're askin'. The "national identity"/immigration/laicity question is the problem of everyone in the society. But the burkha isn't a national issue.. claim that it's an issue to do with pressure from families and kommunities on women, I accept, but it's not anything that government should be legislatin' about imo.
    You raised the issue about banning the burka alienating Islamists.

    My point was that Islamists get alienated over something so pathetic as a cartoon of their revered prophet. Their loyalty or support is not something any western government should want.
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    whats wrong with choice? no the UK shouldn't ban the face veil, just enact a law to ensure that women who don't want to wear it dont have to. jeeez
 
 
 
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