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    (Original post by effofex)
    Are there official state rules regarding what clothing you may wear?

    (not school uniform, formal wear, black tie etc. - I mean OFFICIAL state rules specifying what types of clothing are prohibited in public).

    As far as I am aware, it is an offence to be naked (completely) or exposing one's genitals (indecent exposure), but not to wear veils, hoodies, headscarves, balaclavas, turbans, baseball caps, cricket helmets etc.
    When I was watching Dawn Goes Naked (My reasons were noble :flute:) women can walk around topless, since racks don't count as genitals.
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    The UK should also ban short skirts.
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    Hijaab in Arabic means covering or concealing. Hijaab is the name of something that is used to cover. Everything that comes between two things is hijaab.

    Hijaab means everything that is used to cover something and prevent anyone from reaching it, such as curtains, door keepers and garments, etc.

    Khimaar comes from the word khamr, the root meaning of which is to cover. For example, the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Khammiru aaniyatakum (cover your vessels).” Everything that covers something else is called its khimaar.

    But in common usage khimaar has come to be used as a name for the garment with which a woman covers her head; in some cases this does not go against the linguistic meaning of khimaar.

    Some of the ***ahaa’ have defined it as that which covers the head, the temples and the neck.

    The difference between the hijaab and the khimaar is that the hijaab is something which covers all of a woman’s body, whilst the khimaar in general is something with which a woman covers her head.

    Niqaab is that with which a woman veils her face (tantaqib)…

    The difference between hijaab and niqaab is that the hijaab is that which covers all the body, whilst niqaab is that which covers a woman’s face only.

    The woman’s dress as prescribed in sharee’ah (“Islamic dress”) is that which covers her head, face and all of her body.

    But the niqaab or burqa’ – which shows the eyes of the woman – has become widespread among women, and some of them do not wear it properly. Some scholars have forbidden wearing it on the grounds that it is not Islamic in origin, and because it is used improperly and people treat it as something insignificant, demonstrating negligent attitudes towards it and using new forms of niqaab which are not prescribed in Islam, widening the opening for the eyes so that the cheeks, nose and part of the forehead are also visible.

    Therefore, if the woman’s niqaab or burqa’ does not show anything but the eyes, and the opening is only as big as the left eye, as was narrated from some of the salaf, then that is permissible, otherwise she should wear something which covers her face entirely.

    Shaykh Muhammad al-Saalih al-‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) said:

    The hijaab prescribed in sharee’ah means that a woman should cover everything that it is haraam for her to show, i.e., she should cover that which it is obligatory for her to cover, first and foremost of which is the face, because it is the focus of temptation and desire
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    simply NO,

    I mean lets think about it. Who are we to tell someone what they can and cant wear then claim people have freedom of speach if our government doesnt even allow them to wear something they want to wear, and since when did other peoples cultures and religions become a debating ground open for the input of other people. Its like telling hindus they can no longer wear the bindi (mark on forhead) or telling the jewish community they can no longer grow sideburns or discussing there observing of there dress code in our parliment. ITS simple NOT for us to decide.

    If the government really want to make any dress code laws they should start with women who dress halfnaked and walk down our streets, I mean is there anyone left that remebers the meaning of "Dignity". By all mean blame the government for doing nothing but media plays a big role in making females feel that they only way they would ever find "love" or a relationship is by wearing Mini skirts or shirts which are so exposive. women are objectified in advertising and by the media in general. most adverts targeted for men use a female model. I mean come on the product isnt even used by women, and its these kinda things which forces women into thinking they need to dress like this or men wont come near you.

    I am happy to hear what you think.
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    (Original post by SpamBa)
    It's not a required part of Islam. The Koran only says that women should dress 'modestly'. I support a full ban on the burqa and niqab.
    Not true. Some Muslims believe it to be compulsory. Others only believe it to be recommended. There is a slight difference of opinion amongs sholars regarding covering the face. No one says its not part of Islam.
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    I think there's too many restrictions already, I don't want another one. People should be allowed to wear what they want. Who are you to decide...
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    "Why is a belief of the need to wear a helmet/balaclave more rediculas than a veil."
    Because wearing a helmet/balaclava is not part of a belief in a religion. Or so atleast not one that i know of...lol.
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    no but people should be forced to remove it when entering areas with high security or anywhere else really a person would be told to remove something that covers their face.

    Also wtf is the deal with them allowed in passport photos most people would have there passport application declined if they have some hair covering part of their face.
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    Yes, the women are forced to wear it by their men, it's not for religious purposes. The veil they wear just over their hair is for religion, but it's not compulsory for them to cover their entire face.

    If we have to cover up when we go to their country, why shouldn't they respect our culture aswell?

    Good on France! :]
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    (Original post by Casse)
    Not true. Some Muslims believe it to be compulsory. Others only believe it to be recommended. There is a slight difference of opinion amongs sholars regarding covering the face. No one says its not part of Islam.
    Clearly though, one of these groups has to be wrong.
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    hey if the French is backing it then **** it lol
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    (Original post by shark67)
    The UK should also ban short skirts.
    They're not a barrier to facial-communication and neither do they pose a security threat.
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    (Original post by Weee91)
    "Why is a belief of the need to wear a helmet/balaclave more rediculas than a veil."
    Because wearing a helmet/balaclava is not part of a belief in a religion. Or so atleast not one that i know of...lol.
    Not sure why that should make a difference. Besides anyone could quite simply just declare that it is part of a religion.
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    (Original post by micky022)
    When I was watching Dawn Goes Naked (My reasons were noble :flute:) women can walk around topless, since racks don't count as genitals.
    I not sure about whether they can in the UK.

    I know that on UK TV adverts (excluding sex channels) a woman's nipples (or surrounding breasts) are not allowed to be shown, but on French TV they are.

    I don't know if the law in the UK interprets breasts (female nipples?) as genitals, although obviously the exposure of male nipples by many a football supporter appears to be fine.

    Similarly, whilst it wouldn't technically be illegal to take some viagra, wearing just your boxers and walk around outside a primary school, chances are that police would be called in. (Though I'm not sure what law one would have broken if one was to do this).
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    We boast about freedom of speech and expression. Eh?
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    Im a muslim and i support a 'soft ban'
    Its definitely not suitable in schools, hospitals and public buildings. The UK works in such a way where people have to interact with eachother on a personal level in order to function, especially for businesses. In a time where Islam is seen as an enemy, it would not be the worst thing in the world if people saw that Muslims are human, and not the barbaric sand people we see in th News/Star Wars. They should be allowed to wear it in private places, but thats out of choice.

    Islam does not require the wearing of the Burka at all. it is purely cultural.
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    (Original post by n00)
    Not sure why that should make a difference. Besides anyone could quite simply just declare that it is part of a religion.
    I don't think that veiling is part of a (major) recognized religion. If so, which one is it?
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    (Original post by Joseph90)
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8481617.stm



    Yes.

    I believe the face veil is an unnecessary Scarlet letter that doesn't belong in British society. Some women may want to wear it but I only see it as a restriction and an impairment on all women who wear it.

    It disputes a value that women worked hard to fight for tens of years ago and I abhor it.

    What do you think?
    Next there will be a thread on banning all religions in the UK.
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    I'm ok with berkers, but veils is going too over the top imo, I think it does indeed restrict women's rights in some, if they're kind of forced to wear it anyway, which most of the time they are by their husbands or family or whatever

    but would banning the face veils really be a benefit? the men in the families of these women may force them to wear it still even if they were banned, and they may be scared to take it off, and likely get arrested?
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    No, it shouldn't.
    For many women it is considered an essential part of their faith, so denying them the right to wear it, denies them their freedom and essentially denies them their human rights. Perhaps if people took the time to understand their religion more, instead of blindly accepting the zionist fuelled medias portrayal of it, they would see that it is in fact a religion of peace and justice.
 
 
 
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