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I'm worried about working in a state school watch

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    All your trolls are sick and boring
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    (Original post by thunderarms)
    I can see why you had to post as anon; didn't want people to see that chip on your shoulder.

    At my school, people not only achieved fabulous grades, but got wonderful life experience as the school provided far more outside activities than you'd get at a ****/state school. As for their 'dosage of real life', the kind of contacts you can establish in the independent sector proves why we looked on state school kids with pity.
    I'm gonna dose you some real life with a swift combination of lefts and rights, now take that pine cone out your ass and go and sniff your own farts.
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    I also hope you never become a teacher, you have such a rubbish attitude and I'd hate my children, be it state or private schooled, to be taught by someone like you.

    I want to teach in the future, and am volunteering in a rough inner-London school now. It has its hard days but I seriously love it, the kids are so full of energy and ideas and I get so much satisfaction when I see them learning. I don't condemn private schools but I know should I become a teacher, I would want to work in state school at least for a good 5-10 years. Until my body/mind can't keep up anymore I guess... :P:

    Anyone can teach someone who wants to learn. It takes more to inspire children to want to learn.
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    (Original post by Afrotortina)
    There's no comebacks from thunderarms... I'm dissappointed.....
    same!

    Everyones saying that state schools aren't bad (including me) because they're not, but its the ones that do have problems with students that need the good teachers, people that aren't thunderarms or anyone of his pathetic view of the rest of the world. The country is run by too many people who think state school is the only possible way people can be educate, this is changing and its people from state schools that need to get out there and prove they're wrong and keep it going.
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    Good teachers will be able to inspire people to learn whether it's in a private or state school and I think it's quite naive to think that state schools are full of people who don't want to be there.

    There are a lot of teachers at my school that are able to motive students who would have lot U's, E's or D's and help them to get C's, who would have failed if the teacher hadn't inspired them to WANT to learn. Surely that should be rewarding as a teacher, maybe more so than working the bright students as you really are helping them to change their lives.
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    (Original post by thunderarms)
    This is in Health and Relationships because it's a personal problem rather than a career problem.

    I'm in my second year of uni and am considering doing the secondary PGCE next year. I think I have the golden touch and could really inspire children to aim high, but I'm extremely worried that I'll be placed at some crumby state school. I don't want to brag, but I went to a private school from the age of 5, and while I not only got very good grades, I was surrounded by a hard work ethic and most of my school went to top 5 unis (including me). I'm going to find it really difficult going into a school where the kids' ambition extends to a Friday night swigging White Lightning outside Spar. I'm also going to find it difficult giving careers advice to kids who want to BTECs and apprenticeships etc, as I think that it should be A-levels or nothing if I'm honest. I think I'd be a very good teacher, but only if I felt I wasn't casting pearls before swine, and I think that would be a very hard feeling to get from state schools.

    Would I be able to speak to my university so that I can be placed at either an extremely high performing state school, or a private/independent school?
    Quit now. TRUST ME.
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    (Original post by Pocket Calculator)
    jesus christ. are state schools really that bad? mine was awesome.
    As was mine, what is it with you people and private schools, did you really enjoy seeing Father Martin that much?

    :rolleyes:
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    I'm sure the feelings will be mutual when you get there.
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    (Original post by thunderarms)
    This is in Health and Relationships because it's a personal problem rather than a career problem.

    I'm in my second year of uni and am considering doing the secondary PGCE next year. I think I have the golden touch and could really inspire children to aim high, but I'm extremely worried that I'll be placed at some crumby state school. I don't want to brag, but I went to a private school from the age of 5, and while I not only got very good grades, I was surrounded by a hard work ethic and most of my school went to top 5 unis (including me). I'm going to find it really difficult going into a school where the kids' ambition extends to a Friday night swigging White Lightning outside Spar. I'm also going to find it difficult giving careers advice to kids who want to BTECs and apprenticeships etc, as I think that it should be A-levels or nothing if I'm honest. I think I'd be a very good teacher, but only if I felt I wasn't casting pearls before swine, and I think that would be a very hard feeling to get from state schools.

    Would I be able to speak to my university so that I can be placed at either an extremely high performing state school, or a private/independent school?
    Anyone can teach high achievers. Hardly makes you a good teacher if they're determined enough anyway. If you can't motivate people in state schools and only those you are aiming for the top 5 unis anyway why bother becoming a teacher?
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    There are such things as state grammar schools, where work ethic is indeed very important- moreso than at some private schools perhaps, because all pupils must sit an entrance exam to get a place.
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    I go to a state school and I am quite offended that you classify all state students in this way. I have far more ambition than swigging White lightning on a Friday night and I achieved several A*s at GCSE and plan to go to a 'top' university, as you put it, in October. Lots of people in my school are very motivated, especially because we come from a deprived area where education is the only way of changing your lifestyle.

    If you have this attitude then you should never be a teacher and hopefully will not ever get a job as one. Teaching is meant to be about inspiring people to work and sharing your passion with all types of children and this inevitabely means you might have some challenging pupils, but this is all part of the job.

    It is people like you which are furthering the divide between state schools and private schools without any experience of a state school or the attitudes of the people who attend them
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    You'll need to work your way up to private anyway, they won't accept you straight off the bat.
    and as everyone else has said - don't even bother.
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    People like the OP make me sick. :sigh:
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    I hate the idea of being a teacher but...I can't believe that as someone who wants to be a teacher, you don't want to go into that kind of environment and try and inspire the children there. Aure, teaching in a private school might be great, but would you really get as much satisfaction out of that as you would getting 2 or 3 students from a "crumby" state school to really excel and reach their full potential, go to a good university and get a good job out of it all? I'm sure you'd see a lot more appreciation coming from them at the end too, whereas the private school students would probably just forget you.
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    (Original post by DMV)
    You'll need to work your way up to private anyway, they won't accept you straight off the bat.
    and as everyone else has said - don't even bother.
    Not actually true... 6 or 7 of the teachers at my school were accepted straight from uni without any teaching qualifications, and they're pretty good at teaching too...
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    (Original post by suuuuuuseh)
    There are such things as state grammar schools, where work ethic is indeed very important- moreso than at some private schools perhaps, because all pupils must sit an entrance exam to get a place.
    So do pupils at every private school I know of...I certainly did.
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    (Original post by thunderarms)
    This is in Health and Relationships because it's a personal problem rather than a career problem.

    I'm in my second year of uni and am considering doing the secondary PGCE next year. I think I have the golden touch and could really inspire children to aim high, but I'm extremely worried that I'll be placed at some crumby state school. I don't want to brag, but I went to a private school from the age of 5, and while I not only got very good grades, I was surrounded by a hard work ethic and most of my school went to top 5 unis (including me). I'm going to find it really difficult going into a school where the kids' ambition extends to a Friday night swigging White Lightning outside Spar. I'm also going to find it difficult giving careers advice to kids who want to BTECs and apprenticeships etc, as I think that it should be A-levels or nothing if I'm honest. I think I'd be a very good teacher, but only if I felt I wasn't casting pearls before swine, and I think that would be a very hard feeling to get from state schools.

    Would I be able to speak to my university so that I can be placed at either an extremely high performing state school, or a private/independent school?
    Seeing as you have never been to a state school i think you are over-stereotyping and im actually quite amazed you believe state schools are that bad! (and rather offended)
    Yes some state school kids and some schools are terrible, but teaching isnt just about the careers advice you will be giving, but the actual teaching of the subject. If you are a good teacher you will be able to get through to all kids you try to teach so you really shouldnt have a problem. See it as life experience; i think to go through life and never understand how 'the other half (in your case working class)' live is really unfulfilled.
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    My state school was absolutely dire. And I'd take my crappy education and bimbo Hollyoaks-obsessed A-level teacher over a smug **** like you any day. Please do speak to your uni, please do stick only to your independent schools, I know some where you'll fit in a treat.

    ...is what I would say if I thought it was actually a genuine post. I hope to god it isn't anyway.
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    I'm hoping you're a troll, but:

    Whether or not a school is "crumby" is dependent on the teachers, not the students. I went to a fairly average state school - the classes that worked were the ones with good teachers who inspired the class. It's up to the teacher to provide that sort of environment, not the kids.
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    (Original post by Bobo1234)
    Not actually true... 6 or 7 of the teachers at my school were accepted straight from uni without any teaching qualifications, and they're pretty good at teaching too...
    I thought they'd need sheadloades of expereance to br concidered.
 
 
 
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