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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    TTOs from the Emergency dept or outpatients are chargable prescriptions same as GP scripts ... assuming of course you don't fit into one or more of categroies for exemption

    drugs given by the ambulance service, in hospital and on discharge follwing an inpatient stay are 'free'
    Oh.

    I don't know what a TTO is but I'm shocked that GP prescriptions aren't free. I was always sure they were.

    £7.20 seems rather a lot too. People don't have to pay for surgery and stuff, do they? I think I'd lose all my faith in the NHS if that's true.

    Now I understand why everyone was telling OP it's cheaper to buy medicine...
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    (Original post by Leto)
    Oh.

    I don't know what a TTO is but I'm shocked that GP prescriptions aren't free. I was always sure they were.

    £7.20 seems rather a lot too. People don't have to pay for surgery and stuff, do they? I think I'd lose all my faith in the NHS if that's true.

    Now I understand why everyone was telling OP it's cheaper to buy medicine...

    TTO - to take out i.e. it's a prescription written by the ED or another hospital dept and either dispensed on site or from the hospital pharmacy ( depends if the pharmacy counters are open - they aren't in the middle of the night as the pharmacists are either on call or there's one of them for the whole hospital )

    a lot of people are exempt from prescription charges

    - under 16s and over 60s

    - under 19s in 'full time' further education

    - people with medical conditions that requirement to to take medication long term ( e.g. diabetes, thyroid problems etc etc )

    - people on low incomes and certain tax credits or benefits

    the charge is 7.20 gbp / item regardless of the actual cost of the medication and for meds you are on for a while it'll be a one or two month supply

    there is also the so called 'season ticket' which if you are on a couple of regular meds and have to pay works out cheaper ...

    NHS inpatient care is free, even if you spend 6 months on ITU and another 9 in specialist rehab unit as quite a few of my current client group of patients have following their original injury...
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    The gel was burning my freaking skin for gods sake! Eczema is completely different to acne.

    How about this then, a friend of mine was going with frequent headaches to the doctors. They just told her to go home, they were just headaches. She was in pain everyday but kept getting told it was nothing to worry about.
    This went on for a while. Then she went to the hospital and turns out she had a brain tumour.

    Is this an acceptable mistake?

    No.
    If you post the entire history of the assessments, images etc, then you might have a chance of having a point. Otherwise, whilst I appreciate things don't always go well, have you perphaps considered howmany differentials (different things) headaches can mean?

    Common things are common, and before subjecting thpt to every scan under the sun - you have to take into account that those scans themselves introduce risk to the patient, from radiation and contrast.

    Headaches caused by brain tumour are rare in the grander scale of things, if a patient had a systemic reaction to contrast (even rarer) then the headline would be 'incompetent doctors kill patient with simple scan'. WHich whilst being 'true' also gives completly the wrong impression.

    You should be careful what you say about people, someone might sue you for sander one day. (assuming of course you are mdically qualified to give such opinions anyway)
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    If you post the entire history of the assessments, images etc, then you might have a chance of having a point. Otherwise, whilst I appreciate things don't always go well, have you perphaps considered howmany differentials (different things) headaches can mean?

    Common things are common, and before subjecting thpt to every scan under the sun - you have to take into account that those scans themselves introduce risk to the patient, from radiation and contrast.

    Headaches caused by brain tumour are rare in the grander scale of things, if a patient had a systemic reaction to contrast (even rarer) then the headline would be 'incompetent doctors kill patient with simple scan'. WHich whilst being 'true' also gives completly the wrong impression.

    You should be careful what you say about people, someone might sue you for sander one day. (assuming of course you are mdically qualified to give such opinions anyway)
    Defending somebody without knowing the full clinical scenario is equally as foolhardy as criticizing them.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    TTOs from the Emergency dept or outpatients are chargable prescriptions same as GP scripts ... assuming of course you don't fit into one or more of categroies for exemption

    drugs given by the ambulance service, in hospital and on discharge follwing an inpatient stay are 'free'

    when doing discharges or sorting out tto's ive never had to have a patient pay for it :confused:
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    when doing discharges or sorting out tto's ive never had to have a patient pay for it :confused:
    discharge TTOs for inpatients are not chargable , TTOs from clinics or the ED are chargable although some trusts feel that it's not worth the cost of trying to recover the charge for out of hours ED issued TTOs .. ( as you end up with cash handling in the dept or paying for the invoicing_+ billing and chasing payments)
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    discharge TTOs for inpatients are not chargable , TTOs from clinics or the ED are chargable although some trusts feel that it's not worth the cost of trying to recover the charge for out of hours ED issued TTOs .. ( as you end up with cash handling in the dept or paying for the invoicing_+ billing and chasing payments)

    ohhh not done clinic discharges or ed yet so explains the confusion
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    ive bad bad experiences with GPs/hospitals as have people i know

    me - thought i had a hernia, got told it was a 'bruised muscle' turns out it was a boil

    grandad - had not one but TWO heart attacks misdiagnosed as indigestion, i mean ffs come on!

    bfs uncle - went to GP countless times for pains etc only to be told it was old age, he ended up dying of cancer of the prostate

    cousin - misdiagnosed, had appendicitis, was told he had food poisoning and to 'go home and have plenty of fluids' by the time he got to the operating room he was dying of septicemia

    bf - got told when he was in hospital getting chemo by the nurse that it was 'ok for him, all he had to do was lie in bed all day being waited on, i have to work a 12 hour shift' i swear to GOD if i had of been there she wouldnt have been doing her 12 hour shift, she would have been spending it picking her ******* teeth up off the floor, i think its a ******* disgrace she would say that to a cancer patient

    mam - was told she had parkinsons then told she didnt then told they wernt sure what it was, disgrace

    i have ZERO sympathy for health people and when i hear them whinge about things like pay i just want to ******* slap them all
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    (Original post by tinktinktinkerbell)

    bf - got told when he was in hospital getting chemo by the nurse that it was 'ok for him, all he had to do was lie in bed all day being waited on, i have to work a 12 hour shift' i swear to GOD if i had of been there she wouldnt have been doing her 12 hour shift, she would have been spending it picking her ******* teeth up off the floor, i think its a ******* disgrace she would say that to a cancer patient

    that is a bit inappropiate- i have joked with patients now and again about much rather being in bed for the day, but its light banter with a patient i know- not some young bloke, who's rather ill, was she joking?
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    that is a bit inappropiate- i have joked with patients now and again about much rather being in bed for the day, but its light banter with a patient i know- not some young bloke, who's rather ill, was she joking?

    nope, apparently she was being serious

    even if she was joking its not something you say to someone suffering from cancer, im sure any cancer patient would prefer doing a 12 hour shift than lying there being pumped with drugs that cause awful symptoms
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    Since when are they handing out candy?!
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    (Original post by AsystoleUK)
    No offence to the students on here, I realise this doesn't apply to a large majority of doctors. I'm seriously pissed off with the NHS' quality of care at the moment.

    Not long back I broke a bone in my foot. It wasn't a serious injury, but it was a compound fracture which left me at risk of infection, and I was sent home, told that I had a small fracture, with nothing but a little strapping. I had a blatantly open wound but due to the position of it, It was impossible for me to see it properly (i'm ridiculously tall). The nature of the injury and location didn't really explain why there was an open wound on my foot.

    I went back a week later, at which point I got to see my own Xray from the previous week and could see a fragment of bone protruding through the skin. Nice to know an untrained English student can spot a compound fracture on an Xray and a junior doctor can't. Luckily I didn't have any infection and it's healed now to some degree.

    I just found out a friend slipped and broke his ribs in the shower. His friends had to break the door down and he went to hospital, and has now been sent home without any support and no painkillers. He couldn't get through to his friend so he had to go home on the ******* bus.

    Remind me, what's the point in free healthcare if you don't actually get it?
    To add another "story" some guy in school had "broken his leg" then a few days later he came to school without a cast and everyone was like "wtf dont you need a cast for like 6 weeks" and he said that he went back to the doctor and they said it wasn't broken :p:
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    Your friend had it a little easy, to be honest. I broke my left Radius and Ulna bones in multiple places in my left arm after a bicycle accident. I had to wait an hour for an ambulance in the pouring rain and was laying face up while in excruciating pain (Whittington Hospital was 10mins away). I waited 7 hours for an operation, albeit I did receive painkillers, but having to see your arm bent in such a manner was psychologically painful.
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    (Original post by rainbowbex)
    they might learn that exercise releases endorphines, endorphines decrease stress levels make you HAPPY.

    Sometimes the right diagnosis isn't always easy to make... The amount of stuff doctors have to carry round in our heads all day! why can't people give them a break, they're human not infallible.

    *sigh* ******* patients
    He made me do star jumps in his office
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    If you post the entire history of the assessments, images etc, then you might have a chance of having a point. Otherwise, whilst I appreciate things don't always go well, have you perphaps considered howmany differentials (different things) headaches can mean?

    Common things are common, and before subjecting thpt to every scan under the sun - you have to take into account that those scans themselves introduce risk to the patient, from radiation and contrast.

    Headaches caused by brain tumour are rare in the grander scale of things, if a patient had a systemic reaction to contrast (even rarer) then the headline would be 'incompetent doctors kill patient with simple scan'. WHich whilst being 'true' also gives completly the wrong impression.

    You should be careful what you say about people, someone might sue you for sander one day. (assuming of course you are mdically qualified to give such opinions anyway)
    I haven't insulted anyone or said anything that would count as slander (because both instances actually happened, plus I didn't mention names). Im not a child so don't talk to me like one.

    If I'm unhappy with a service I can complain about it. If my friend was unhappy she could complain, which she did. I was telling the story.

    If you eat food in a restaurant that is disgusting are you going to not complain because you don't have a catering qualification?
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    You know when i was younger i was told i just had congestion, when actually i had asthma and had an attack a few weeks later. I wasn't fussed, i didn't blame the doctors as these things happen

    It was a mistake of the doctor, but acne and ezcema can be easily mixed up, i was also told i had acne as a teenager when it was roseca and psoriasis...it's not the end of the world, it's human and thats life.
    I know, I was just putting my experience across. I'm still alive (:p:) and fine.
    The majority of NHS workers and Doctors are fine
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    Ok yes, some of these stories are so very unfortunate but how many of us (and people we know) have received good treatment??

    Its so easy to pull apart a free system that we feel owed to us, but what about all those times we have been dealt with well.

    Although my burns were misdiagnosed and horrific (i was writing my PS for med school with my right hand & fingers individually bandaged) the nurses i saw who patched me up were AMAZING.

    I've been given quick treatment when I inhaled a piece of plastic (stupid I know) and my mum was treated so very well when she had cancer. My ex bf was diagnosed immediately with Bells Palsy and subsequently no lasting damage.

    I think the media paint a picture that the NHS is so goddamn awful with its waiting times and substandard care...i think we should be grateful that such a system exists. I couldn't possibly afford US med insurance.
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    I do think the person who posted about her bf's experience with cancer and his dimwitted doctor is an exception. That ***** needs a slap in the mouth.

    Reminds me when I was born my mother couldnt stop me screaming...the nurse said something along the lines of " can't you get her to shut up?" . My mum after 24 hours of painful labour, tearing and transfusion punched her in the face til she was flat on the floor.

    Priceless
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    I do think the person who posted about her bf's experience with cancer and his dimwitted doctor is an exception. That ***** needs a slap in the mouth.

    Reminds me when I was born my mother couldnt stop me screaming...the nurse said something along the lines of " can't you get her to shut up?" . My mum after 24 hours of painful labour, tearing and transfusion punched her in the face til she was flat on the floor.

    Priceless
    Your mum = a hero
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    (Original post by tinktinktinkerbell)
    ive bad bad experiences with GPs/hospitals as have people i know

    me - thought i had a hernia, got told it was a 'bruised muscle' turns out it was a boil

    grandad - had not one but TWO heart attacks misdiagnosed as indigestion, i mean ffs come on!

    bfs uncle - went to GP countless times for pains etc only to be told it was old age, he ended up dying of cancer of the prostate

    cousin - misdiagnosed, had appendicitis, was told he had food poisoning and to 'go home and have plenty of fluids' by the time he got to the operating room he was dying of septicemia

    bf - got told when he was in hospital getting chemo by the nurse that it was 'ok for him, all he had to do was lie in bed all day being waited on, i have to work a 12 hour shift' i swear to GOD if i had of been there she wouldnt have been doing her 12 hour shift, she would have been spending it picking her ******* teeth up off the floor, i think its a ******* disgrace she would say that to a cancer patient

    mam - was told she had parkinsons then told she didnt then told they wernt sure what it was, disgrace

    i have ZERO sympathy for health people and when i hear them whinge about things like pay i just want to ******* slap them all

    And we wonder why there are signs up saying not to assault their staff... Of course I expect a lot of it is drunken people who can't keep their hands off the nurses,but I do wonder about why certain people go into nursing, medicine etc and if some of them don't get a kicking or someone swearing at them because they basically should be stacking shelves or flipping burgers.

    The problem is I have come across an arrogance amongst people who claim to work in the NHS,especially online here,Can't say I come across much of it in realife so either these people are lying about who they are ,or they are not as opinionated at work as they know they will be gripped by management. I think it ought to be remembered that the NHS is not 'free' and taxpayers pay their wages. We are not just patients but customers.I think one big problem with a nationalised health service, is the huge bureacracy means some people can hide in the system that have no business working in a hospital, and an attitude amongst some who work for the NHS that you accept what you are give and be glad of it.

    I have to say if anyone of my family was spoken too like that while undergoing cancer treatment ,that nurse would have a very unpleasant experience and feeling tired would be the least of her problems. Mistakes happen, but callousness is a whole other thing.
 
 
 
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