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    I'm sorry if this question has been asked many times before but I wanted it maybe more specific to my goals. I'm 16 (nearly 17) years old and I'm pretty skinny/slim. I've read quite a bit about the "need" to bulk up to gain significant muscle and then in the Summer or so you cut and look amazing (or so you hope).

    However, is that really something that is necessary? A lot do it which is why it seems like a good idea but I've read a few other articles which have stated there is no point unless you want to compete professionally or anything and that it's much better to be "ripped" all year rather than just for a few months. There was also stuff about it not being good for your body to have some weight swings.

    I know it's meant to be about making a lot of muscle growth but surely all you need for that is protein - can't you take-in enough protein and still have a healthy/not too fatty diet?

    I don't have any specific goals but I play quite a bit of tennis and obviously want to get fitter and be much better at it. My ideal is Rafael Nadal because he's VERY fit and strong but I can't really imagine him being on such a programme when he plays tennis for most of the year? I mean, what about normal athletes like soccer plays, tennis players etc? They play most of the year and they don't bulk but many do weight-training and everything.
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    It's easier to dirty bulk, and then cut. It's just the lazy way really.. Most people could clean bulk but it involves more effort in making healthy food lol and your strength gains might not be as good as if you just ate loads and loads.

    Depends on your aims and commitment and your bodytype to a degree. A high protein, low fat diet would be a clean bulk so you don't need to cut.

    Althetes train different to strength athletes. Look up westside for skinny *******s it's based on you doing sports as well. I don't know about specific athletes, but sprinters, cyclists and what not will squat, power clean and what not. It's power based stuff which is balanced with the sport you play.
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    (Original post by Michael XYZ)
    I'm sorry if this question has been asked many times before but I wanted it maybe more specific to my goals. I'm 16 (nearly 17) years old and I'm pretty skinny/slim. I've read quite a bit about the "need" to bulk up to gain significant muscle and then in the Summer or so you cut and look amazing (or so you hope).

    However, is that really something that is necessary? A lot do it which is why it seems like a good idea but I've read a few other articles which have stated there is no point unless you want to compete professionally or anything and that it's much better to be "ripped" all year rather than just for a few months. There was also stuff about it not being good for your body to have some weight swings.
    They're both different means of achieving the same thing and both have their advantages and disadvantages.

    Bulking and cutting cycles mean that you can gain muscle relatively quickly whereas bulking with little or no fat gain is incredibly difficult and it can literally take years to gain discernible amounts of muscle.

    As for this argument about gaining/losing large amounts of weight unless you're a competitor you're not going to be gaining/losing that much weight and/or that quickly and/or that often.

    (Original post by Michael XYZ)
    I know it's meant to be about making a lot of muscle growth but surely all you need for that is protein - can't you take-in enough protein and still have a healthy/not too fatty diet?
    You also need energy, without sufficient energy your body cannot synthesise muscle and it may actually metabolise that protein for energy.

    To gain muscle at the most efficient rate you will gain some fat but as long as you're sensible about it this can be a very small amount.

    Fat is an essential component of your diet (you'd be dead without it), in the right quantities and from the right sources it will do you far more good than harm.

    (Original post by Michael XYZ)
    I don't have any specific goals but I play quite a bit of tennis and obviously want to get fitter and be much better at it. My ideal is Rafael Nadal because he's VERY fit and strong but I can't really imagine him being on such a programme when he plays tennis for most of the year? I mean, what about normal athletes like soccer plays, tennis players etc? They play most of the year and they don't bulk but many do weight-training and everything.
    If you want to get better at your sport you've got to play and some sport specific weight training could help but at the end of the day it's about your priorities. You will never get that big and/or that strong without some dedicated strength and/or hypertrophy work, then again this will have a negative effect on your skill work (hence most sportsmen don't do it and hence most aren't particularly muscular).
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    Go for a Bruce Lee look. Slim but muscular
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    (Original post by puma21)
    Go for a Bruce Lee look. Slim but muscular
    Go for cyanide.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    If you want to get better at your sport you've got to play and some sport specific weight training could help but at the end of the day it's about your priorities. You will never get that big and/or that strong without some dedicated strength and/or hypertrophy work, then again this will have a negative effect on your skill work (hence most sportsmen don't do it and hence most aren't particularly muscular).
    Negative effect? Is it minor or is it all relative? I mean quite a lot of athletes do strength training and they don't really 100% require it in that it isn't wrestling or something but surely they wouldn't be doing that if it gets them "worse" skill-wise?
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    (Original post by Michael XYZ)
    Negative effect? Is it minor or is it all relative?
    The fatigue will have a detrimental effect on your skill work hence many athletes keep strength and/or hypertrophy work to a minimum in season.

    Like I said it depends on your priorities. If you want to be a better player playing more tennis is going to be very high on your list of priorities, likewise if strength and/or hypertrophy is your thing then tennis is going to take a bit of a back seat.
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    go for middleweight boxer look- they're pretty muscly but not too muscly and they're quite athletic. There's no point having so much muscle if you can't use it efficiently
    something like this



    or this

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    (Original post by 9MmBulletz)
    go for middleweight boxer look- they're pretty muscly but not too muscly and they're quite athletic. There's no point having so much muscle if you can't use it efficiently
    Yeah...

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    (Original post by SMed)
    Yeah...

    Yes because fighting someone who has never had an MMA match before is proof of that :/

    He kicks someone decent like that and he will have his back on the canvas.
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    (Original post by SMed)
    Yeah...

    i see your point but what i was trying to say a balance between cardio and resistance/strength/weight training or whatever.
    since you have more knowledge in the area please advise him
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Yes because fighting someone who has never had an MMA match before is proof of that :/

    He kicks someone decent like that and he will have his back on the canvas.
    **** you Ruck, **** YOOOUUUUU! lol

    Just that the guy's big and he's still got moves. Jus sayin'.
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    :rofl:

    i thought clean bulking meant just avoid dodgey stuff like burgers and chips and what have you not?
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    (Original post by cowsforsale)
    :rofl:

    i thought clean bulking meant just avoid dodgey stuff like burgers and chips and what have you not?
    It is.

    I can't remember the exact term for it but basically there's a group of people who don't believe in cutting and/or bulking and instead train/diet for lean muscle gain with little or no fat ('lean bulk'?). As you can imagine it is very difficult to achieve and is a very long process because that person is running a very small calorie excess and/or working on the edge of maintenance.

    I remember reading a Q&A article about it a while back and a competitor basically said that for most people it would take literally years to gain 20+lbs of muscle with little or no fat gain (or even losing fat).
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    No clean bulking is not eating healthy foods and i dont know why people assume so, if i eat 1000 cals over my maintinance eating skinless chicken breasts and brown rice i'm still going to gain fat, clean bulking is eating just over maintinance so you have enough cals to add mass but will aqquire minimal fat gains. For a first time bulk just dirty bulk as you will always be eating enough and can maximise your newb gains by adding weight and strength quickly. Then cut and clean bulk/maintain from there on. Got it?
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    If you're an ectomorph, **** 'clean' bulking. **** macro nutrient splits. **** eating clean.

    It's hard enough reaching maintenance calories as an ecto, and the bigger you get, the more this will be true. The reality is you can maintain a six pack all year round eating ice cream and cheese burgers and not add a single picogram of muscle eating skinless chicken breast and broccoli.

    If you're chubby, then yeah, you'll need to be a bit more considerate about your food.
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    It's probably dependent on various factors, but I found it relatively easy to put on muscle at first with no noticeable fat gain. When I started training I put on around a stone relatively quickly and as far as I can tell my body fat percentage stayed about the same. However, after that I've had virtually no luck trying to put on any more weight with a slight calorie excess (although I wasn't really trying that hard as I tend to rotate around which sports I'm focusing on a lot) which is why I'm now trying to pile on the pounds and get stronger - I can worry about stripping some of the fat off later if I need to.
 
 
 
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