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    (Original post by emilina)
    no offence, but that's not really something to brag about.

    everyone handles driving differently. personally i would never have been able to drive up to sheffield 120 miles with three other people in the car having only recently passed my test. not through lack of ability, but more because of the worry of going from 0-60 so quickly (and i don't mean car speeds :rolleyes:).
    I'm not really bragging, just saying that in my experience it really wasn't that bad. When driving you need to find the fine line between cockiness and confidence because you'll get into trouble if you stray too far either way. You're just as likely to make mistakes behind the wheel if you're underconfident as you are if you're too cocky, just different kinds of mistakes. Like I said in my other recent post, the respect for your machine and those around you is paramount, but only when mixed with enough confidence in your own abilities and if you understand that then you'll be ok on the roads.
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    I'm not really bragging, just saying that in my experience it really wasn't that bad. When driving you need to find the fine line between cockiness and confidence because you'll get into trouble if you stray too far either way. You're just as likely to make mistakes behind the wheel if you're underconfident as you are if you're too cocky, just different kinds of mistakes. Like I said in my other recent post, the respect for your machine and those around you is paramount, but only when mixed with enough confidence in your own abilities and if you understand that then you'll be ok on the roads.
    and how many people do find the fine line? my car was recently smashed up in a parking lot. by a new driver. he wrote it off. i have complete respect for my 'machine' and those around me. and complete confidence in my own abilities. i wasn't ok. everyone is different. something you seem to be missing
    i'm well aware you are likely to make mistakes being underconfident. however i think going 120miles on motorways with no previous experience, and three teens in the back, is being cocky, and your attitude seems that way as well since you are judging everyone by the fact YOU were able to go that far. it's not a matter of respecting your machine blah blah blah. it's a matter of being responsible. and i'm sorry. that isn't responsible.
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    (Original post by adambro)
    My rough calculation would give a fuel cost of £12.22 total for 120 miles at 50mpg with diesel at £1.12 per litre. Of course I may have gone wrong somewhere, and that is only based upon estimates, but as others have said, fuel cost isn't the only consideration in sharing the costs.

    I'm not sure how comfortable I'd be though having someone who "has just passed his driving test" driving 120 miles to a football match with his mates. He really might well advised to gain experience on his own in less stressful situations.
    50mpg is pushing it a bit... I'd say 40 ish. (No less though)
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    (Original post by emilina)
    and how many people do find the fine line? my car was recently smashed up in a parking lot. by a new driver. he wrote it off. i have complete respect for my 'machine' and those around me. and complete confidence in my own abilities. i wasn't ok. everyone is different. something you seem to be missing
    i'm well aware you are likely to make mistakes being underconfident. however i think going 120miles on motorways with no previous experience, and three teens in the back, is being cocky, and your attitude seems that way as well since you are judging everyone by the fact YOU were able to go that far. it's not a matter of respecting your machine blah blah blah. it's a matter of being responsible. and i'm sorry. that isn't responsible.
    The night after I passed my test I drove from Brum to London and back just because I could.

    First time on the motorway and there were 0 issues, apart from me not knowing where to turn off .
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    The night after I passed my test I drove from Brum to London and back just because I could.

    First time on the motorway and there were 0 issues, apart from me not knowing where to turn off .
    that's up to you. i'm just saying that especially with three teens in the back, it's a pretty stupid first journey. and someone sitting there saying it is easy and you'll have no problems as long as you have respect for your machine, is just stupid.
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    Is it better to take a car to uni?
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    (Original post by Ahsan_123)
    Is it better to take a car to uni?
    what?
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    (Original post by Jeester)
    50mpg is pushing it a bit... I'd say 40 ish. (No less though)
    Thank you, I used a online calculator (thisismoney.co.uk) and that came up with £15 so i reckon we should offer him £8 each and aplit parking on top, the extra money being for the "stress" which is being discussed so intensly.

    "i'm just saying that especially with three teens in the back, it's a pretty stupid first journey" Sorry i don't know how to do 2 quotes

    i'm sorry if i wasn't clear, I didn't mean to mislead you. there will be three of us in the car, me (18) and my two mates (20, 21) the 21 year old being the driver, he's involved in offroading/rallycross i'm not too sure So I ave no doubt in his driving ability, but thank you for your concern. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't being ripped off, being short of money and what have you
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    (Original post by RaggedyBen)
    Thank you, I used a online calculator (thisismoney.co.uk) and that came up with £15 so i reckon we should offer him £8 each and aplit parking on top, the extra money being for the "stress" which is being discussed so intensly.

    "i'm just saying that especially with three teens in the back, it's a pretty stupid first journey" Sorry i don't know how to do 2 quotes

    i'm sorry if i wasn't clear, I didn't mean to mislead you. there will be three of us in the car, me (18) and my two mates (20, 21) the 21 year old being the driver, he's involved in offroading/rallycross i'm not too sure So I ave no doubt in his driving ability, but thank you for your concern. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't being ripped off, being short of money and what have you

    that's insulting.

    and you press 'quote' in teh bottom left of the post you want to quote. it's not your ages so much that concern me, more that he is a new driver and that there are other peope in the car. the fact you are all young doesn't help. . .
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    That's not a bad deal. So long as he isn't making profit out of it and he's chipping in some money as well I wouldn't complain.
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    (Original post by RaggedyBen)
    Hey, my mate has just passed his driving test and has offered to drive the 3 of us to football away matches instead of taking the train as we usually do. He has an N Reg Peugot 106 Diesel, I think it's a 1.5 engine, maybe less

    For our 1st journey we are going from Sheffield to West Brom around a 120 mile round trip, he's suggested £12.50 each for petrol there and back, thats over £35 in total, we think thats too much. Is it?

    Why don't you all take the train? You can chat, walk around, look at other passengers, meet girls and get drunk.
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    By comparison, the cheapest open train fare is £22.95 for a saver return with a YP railcard (assuming you're doing Sheffield to Birmingham NS). As to getting drunk, the BTP are usually around when there is football on so if you try that one you'd probably get thrown off the station!
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    (Original post by RaggedyBen)
    Thank you, I used a online calculator (thisismoney.co.uk) and that came up with £15 so i reckon we should offer him £8 each and aplit parking on top, the extra money being for the "stress" which is being discussed so intensly.

    "i'm just saying that especially with three teens in the back, it's a pretty stupid first journey" Sorry i don't know how to do 2 quotes

    i'm sorry if i wasn't clear, I didn't mean to mislead you. there will be three of us in the car, me (18) and my two mates (20, 21) the 21 year old being the driver, he's involved in offroading/rallycross i'm not too sure So I ave no doubt in his driving ability, but thank you for your concern. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't being ripped off, being short of money and what have you
    Except that he has to pay for insurance, the MOT, the tax, new tyres - any number of things and considering the train fare is more than twenty quid I think you'd better cough up for the £12.50 really.

    On the driving side of things, if he's into 4x4s and rally cross then you'll be absolutely fine (assuming he actually participates in either of these sports).
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    Not really stressful :confused: I drove a fully loaded Land Rover with 5 (6 people on the way home, not sure how we managed that) people 200 miles round trip to a festival a month or two after I passed my test and it was fine. Music cranked up and everyone singing/talking and we just sat in the slow lane taking it easy apart from the odd excitement of overtaking a lorry and the M5/M4 junction just North of Bristol to negotiate.

    Oh good for you

    however i've been driving probably before you grew your first pube, and as emilina says, as a new driver you're only just getting used to driving by yourself, and gaining skills you wouldn't have necessarily have gained whilst learning- as being a qualified driver is a whole different parkfield. Let alone motorway driving, which can seem easy when you're a passenger, but as a new driver it's intimidating with the speed and not all drivers have common sense.

    The RoSPA produced a document back in 2002, that is just as relevant today about the factors why so many new drivers have accidents
    http://www.rospa.com/RoadSafety/advi...ers/policy.htm


    Just because you had the attitude to reckon you could drive a land rover along the M5, does not mean the majority can. If anything you were acting rather recklessly by doing that.

    I'd advice any new drivers NOT to even consider motorway driving since they've been out by themselves around an area they're familiar with atleast for 4 weeks, and also keep passengers to a minimum. Looking back to when I passed my test, it took a great deal of concentration the first few months, I chose to stick to motorway driving only for small distances of around 30miles and didn't do a long haul trip until 9 months into passing my test- advice which was reiterated by my instructor, parents and many others who've been driving for a while and it's advice i'd pass on now. The op's friend may have been an offroad driver, but the motorway is another ballpark and requires a different skill and attitude


    As an experienced driver, there is nothing more annoying than a bad attitude of a new driver, still with his P plates on, and doing something dangerous- SO, op think safe.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    Oh good for you

    however i've been driving probably before you grew your first pube, and as emilina says, as a new driver you're only just getting used to driving by yourself, and gaining skills you wouldn't have necessarily have gained whilst learning- as being a qualified driver is a whole different parkfield. Let alone motorway driving, which can seem easy when you're a passenger, but as a new driver it's intimidating with the speed and not all drivers have common sense.

    The RoSPA produced a document back in 2002, that is just as relevant today about the factors why so many new drivers have accidents
    http://www.rospa.com/RoadSafety/advi...ers/policy.htm


    Just because you had the attitude to reckon you could drive a land rover along the M5, does not mean the majority can. If anything you were acting rather recklessly by doing that.

    I'd advice any new drivers NOT to even consider motorway driving since they've been out by themselves around an area they're familiar with atleast for 4 weeks, and also keep passengers to a minimum. Looking back to when I passed my test, it took a great deal of concentration the first few months, I chose to stick to motorway driving only for small distances of around 30miles and didn't do a long haul trip until 9 months into passing my test- advice which was reiterated by my instructor, parents and many others who've been driving for a while and it's advice i'd pass on now. The op's friend may have been an offroad driver, but the motorway is another ballpark and requires a different skill and attitude


    As an experienced driver, there is nothing more annoying than a bad attitude of a new driver, still with his P plates on, and doing something dangerous- SO, op think safe.
    Keep your pants on. It may well have been 'reckless' but I've been driving for well over a year now (I know, nothing on your spotless record) and even with my 'bad attitude' I haven't yet been in an accident or in a situation that I couldn't handle. I don't drive like a knob like so many other guys my age and I know how my car handles inside out. Two months after driving to the festival I was on another long motorway haul in pouring rain, sheet water and 20m visibility due to spray. Speed down, slow lane and I was ok. Granted I was on my own that time but I survived. Every one of my friend's parents has no qualms about letting their kids out in my car because they trust me, which is more than can be said for many other guys my age with cars. You have no idea how I am behind the wheel of a car other than what I've posted on this thread. I don't pretend that I have more experience than you but please don't underestimate me.

    The OP's friend is into off roading. Teaches you spacial awareness, car control and how to handle a car in very low traction conditions. And Rally Cross - do you even know what that is? It's taking a small beat up car and thrashing it around an off road/tarmac track as fast as you can and let no one get in your way. It's totally nuts but if that doesn't teach you to be aware of those in cars around you at speed then I don't know what will. We all gotta start somewhere and you have to take risks to move forward in life. The OP's friend is also, I think, 21 so he has 3 years life experience on me and will be oh-so much wiser.

    One time I was in a position where I had 11 people in my car (don't worry, it was legal, they all had seats, before you start on at me for being reckless again) and a fully loaded roof rack 2 feet deep in baggage, tents and a bike and we made it the 9 miles we needed to go without any problems. Tell me you've done that and know more about driving a heavily loaded 4x4 with a very high COG before you go on and on about years of experience. People can go for years doing exactly the same thing in the same kind of car and not really learnt anything. I've done a lot of different things (different loads, different conditions, different roads) in 5 or 6 different cars since I've passed and I've learnt a lot. I don't kid myself that I haven't got a lot of learning yet to do but I've had more experience across a range of vehicles and conditions than many my age have.
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    man what are you folks talking about
    motorway driving is the easiest type of driving there is
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    (Original post by munn)
    man what are you folks talking about
    motorway driving is the easiest type of driving there is
    This, and it's statistically the safest type of road to be on.

    There really isn't anything to motorway driving. Minimal steering, not gear changes, just observations!



    Incidentally, I do think he's charging a bit much.

    A small diesel like that should easily do 50mpg, so he'd need 2.4 gallons of diesel, using price per litre to be £1.12, I work it out as £12.20.

    So £3.05 each for fuel. He could really be petty and add on his "wear and tear". Way I see it, servicing is every year on average mileage (12,000) so this trip accounts for 1% of that?

    Cost per tyre for this trip?

    Assuming they only last 15,000 miles and cost £40/tyre:

    I work it out to be about 1p per mile spent on tyres (could be wrong though - just rough calculations here)

    So add another £1.20 onto that total!

    The MOT, well I get mine for £35 but I gather £50 is the average. Again using 12,000 miles/year it costs less than half a penny per mile, but lets add it on anyway.

    Call it 60p for the trip.

    Total is now at £14.

    Servicing:

    £100 every 12,000 miles

    So just under a penny per mile.

    £1.20 for this trip.

    Total up to £15.20

    Tax? Parkers says up to £215/year so we'll use that figure.

    So about 2p per mile, so add £2.40 to total.

    £17.60

    It's a damned cheek if he expects a contribution to his insurance but again let's be petty.

    Let's say it's £1200/year for him.

    That's 10p per mile, so £12 for this trip in insurance. I think it's cheeky to expect that. After all you can't make a profit, just get compensation for reasonable wear and tear. If he's making profit and not insured for business use it could void his insurance I believe.

    So total without making a profit is £17.60, working out to be £4.40 each (I'm counting him as a contributer since he's in the car and going too!)

    Total, making a profit is £29.60, working out to be £7.40 each.

    In short, you are being ripped off, but I wouldn't make a big deal over it.
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    (Original post by RaggedyBen)
    Hey, my mate has just passed his driving test and has offered to drive the 3 of us to football away matches instead of taking the train as we usually do. He has an N Reg Peugot 106 Diesel, I think it's a 1.5 engine, maybe less

    For our 1st journey we are going from Sheffield to West Brom around a 120 mile round trip, he's suggested £12.50 each for petrol there and back, thats over £35 in total, we think thats too much. Is it?
    your lucky your being chauffered around... if it where my mate Id round it down to £10.00 or less only because they are my mates.(generally returning the favour) It does sound like hes making some money out of you . though at least your prepared to pay I think I can see that that is a bit much maybe £15 from all three of you is enough (£5 each) I could bloody drive you there... he might be taking too much money the git. TO think of it I wouldnt charge my mates especially if im driving there for myself as well. so In conclusion (lol) i think yeh he is charging too much.( it would be mean if you hopped in and didnt contribute). Overall its too much.
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    WTF a motorway is a duel carriage way, 10mph faster and an extra lane. If you have problems with it then you shouldn't have a license, end of.
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    (Original post by R. Murray)
    This, and it's statistically the safest type of road to be on.

    There really isn't anything to motorway driving. Minimal steering, not gear changes, just observations!



    Incidentally, I do think he's charging a bit much.

    A small diesel like that should easily do 50mpg, so he'd need 2.4 gallons of diesel, using price per litre to be £1.12, I work it out as £12.20.

    So £3.05 each for fuel. He could really be petty and add on his "wear and tear". Way I see it, servicing is every year on average mileage (12,000) so this trip accounts for 1% of that?

    Cost per tyre for this trip?

    Assuming they only last 15,000 miles and cost £40/tyre:

    I work it out to be about 1p per mile spent on tyres (could be wrong though - just rough calculations here)

    So add another £1.20 onto that total!

    The MOT, well I get mine for £35 but I gather £50 is the average. Again using 12,000 miles/year it costs less than half a penny per mile, but lets add it on anyway.

    Call it 60p for the trip.

    Total is now at £14.

    Servicing:

    £100 every 12,000 miles

    So just under a penny per mile.

    £1.20 for this trip.

    Total up to £15.20

    Tax? Parkers says up to £215/year so we'll use that figure.

    So about 2p per mile, so add £2.40 to total.

    £17.60

    It's a damned cheek if he expects a contribution to his insurance but again let's be petty.

    Let's say it's £1200/year for him.

    That's 10p per mile, so £12 for this trip in insurance. I think it's cheeky to expect that. After all you can't make a profit, just get compensation for reasonable wear and tear. If he's making profit and not insured for business use it could void his insurance I believe.

    So total without making a profit is £17.60, working out to be £4.40 each (I'm counting him as a contributer since he's in the car and going too!)

    Total, making a profit is £29.60, working out to be £7.40 each.

    In short, you are being ripped off, but I wouldn't make a big deal over it.
    But as someone else pointed out you're looking at around £30 for a train ticket and that's after various things like student discount so OP really shouldn't be complaining at having to pay half of the that.
 
 
 
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