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    Hi all.

    How uncommon is it to get your undergraduate degree in the UK and attend law school in the US? How difficult is it to get in to a top-tier US law school with a UK undergraduate degree?

    As an example, how hard would it be to be admitted into Harvard Law School with an undergraduate degree from Oxbridge? Would you have to get a 1st at least, or would it still be doable otherwise?

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by iwmo)
    Hi all.

    How uncommon is it to get your undergraduate degree in the UK and attend law school in the US? How difficult is it to get in to a top-tier US law school with a UK undergraduate degree?

    As an example, how hard would it be to be admitted into Harvard Law School with an undergraduate degree from Oxbridge? Would you have to get a 1st at least, or would it still be doable otherwise?

    Thanks.
    If you get a first from Oxford, get a decent LSAT score, and have the money to pay your tuition, your getting in will be piece of cake
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    If you get a first from Oxford, get a decent LSAT score, and have the money to pay your tuition, your getting in will be piece of cake
    not quite...a first from Oxford and a very good (not decent) LSAT score will give you a reasonable shot at HLS. If you have good references and a good admissions essay as well it's fairly likely you'll get into one of the top 10 law schools.
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    What you need to ask yourself is, do you really want to go to Law school in the States ?It is oversubscribed and the job opportunities limited.
    You will spend 1/5 of million $ and you are not sure you will get the job you want.
    This is a lot of money, man, and remember, you can only work in the States.Not only this, I think you are only limited to a certain state.
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    Just go do Law as an undergrad @ a top UK uni and get a 1st in that..
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    Thanks for the replies.

    Either way, I don't intend to do law as an undergrad. What percentage of Oxbridge students usually get 1sts (How difficult is it to get a 1st?)? Is it more difficult to get into a top-tier US law school after completing your undergraduate degree at an ivy-league university or after completing it at Oxbridge? How does a 1st translate in terms of gpa? A 2:1?

    Sorry for the trivial questions - I'm an American student and I'm unfamiliar with the UK system.
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    (Original post by iwmo)
    Thanks for the replies.

    Either way, I don't intend to do law as an undergrad. What percentage of Oxbridge students usually get 1sts (How difficult is it to get a 1st?)? Is it more difficult to get into a top-tier US law school after completing your undergraduate degree at an ivy-league university or after completing it at Oxbridge?
    Ivy League.
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    (Original post by Y50727)
    Ivy League.
    Why so?

    OP, just continue your studies at a top BRITISH school, the USA is a bump! nearly a quarter of a million dollars!
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    Is money no object here?
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    It may be an issue... but for the purposes of this question let's assume that it is not.
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    Thanks for the replies so far.

    To sum up my questions:

    1) Would getting a 1st in my UK uni be necessary to be admitted to top US law schools (i.e. Yale, Harvard, Stanford, T-14)?
    2) What would be more advantageous to getting accepted into a top US law school: an undergraduate degree from a lower-ivy US university or an undergraduate degree from Oxbridge?
    3) Does graduating from an oversees universities (i.e. UK) put you at a disadvantage when applying to US law schools?

    I am originally from the US, so I would like to attend law school in the US if possible.
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    (Original post by iwmo)
    1) Would getting a 1st in my UK uni be necessary to be admitted to top US law schools (i.e. Yale, Harvard, Stanford, T-14)? .
    Having a 1st is only a starting point to get you in the door but you must have other qualities that set you apart from other candidates with the same credentials. Admission to Tier 1 law schools is largely based on grades and the LSAT score. The LSAT score being the most important factor as it separates students into the acceptance, rejection, hold, or deferral pile.

    (Original post by iwmo)
    2) What would be more advantageous to getting accepted into a top US law school: an undergraduate degree from a lower-ivy US university or an undergraduate degree from Oxbridge?.
    In my opinion, I would say it’s not necessary the school you earned your undergraduate degree which places you in contention with gaining a placement at Yale, Harvard, Stanford etc. Rather, your own undergraduate performance (grades, internships, jobs, leadership potential, publications of scholarly work, foreign language skills, study abroad and/or foreign study), LSAT score (major determinant), personal statement, and letters of recommendation. Your undergrad institution if impressive, would give your application extra consideration though if your grades and LSAT score do not measure up to the output of students applying from the same school then you are at a disadvantage. The point I’m trying to make here is – it’s not the school but you.

    (Original post by iwmo)
    3) Does graduating from an oversees universities (i.e. UK) put you at a disadvantage when applying to US law schools?.
    I wouldn’t think so especially, since you mentioned you are originally from the US and must possess dual citizenship. Rather, it might be an advantage.

    (Original post by iwmo)
    I would like to attend law school in the US if possible .
    What types of law are you interested in specializing in while you’re in law school (i.e. intellectual property, corporate, international)? Remember rankings in the US differ if you wish to specialize in a certain area of law.

    Hope this helps. Quote me for a reply if you have any more questions.
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    (Original post by AliciaJ703)
    Having a 1st is only a starting point to get you in the door but you must have other qualities that set you apart from other candidates with the same credentials. Admission to Tier 1 law schools is largely based on grades and the LSAT score. The LSAT score being the most important factor as it separates students into the acceptance, rejection, hold, or deferral pile.
    As far as I know (reasonably far) most law schools separate students using a grid with the GPA in the rows (colums) and LSAT in the columns (rows). They then use your both values to see where you place in that table and then rank you accordingly. Typically it's a 50-50 weighting.
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    (Original post by BigFudamental)
    As far as I know (reasonably far) most law schools separate students using a grid with the GPA in the rows (colums) and LSAT in the columns (rows). They then use your both values to see where you place in that table and then rank you accordingly. Typically it's a 50-50 weighting.
    That's true. I was explaining that the biggest factor is the LSAT score since various grading scales or grade inflation places more emphasis on the LSAT as being the great equalizer.
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    (Original post by BigFudamental)
    As far as I know (reasonably far) most law schools separate students using a grid with the GPA in the rows (colums) and LSAT in the columns (rows). They then use your both values to see where you place in that table and then rank you accordingly. Typically it's a 50-50 weighting.
    Eh...depends on the law school. Usually they weight one more than the other. Georgetown leans towards LSAT scores (it's possible to get in with a 170 and 3.5), whereas Berkeley is exactly the opposite.
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    (Original post by devil09)
    Eh...depends on the law school. Usually they weight one more than the other. Georgetown leans towards LSAT scores (it's possible to get in with a 170 and 3.5), whereas Berkeley is exactly the opposite.
    Fair enough, but one doesn't in general override the other.
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    Thank you for the replies.

    If you were to choose a university solely on the basis of increasing your chances of getting into a US Law School (This is most definitely not the case- but let us pretend that it is for a moment for the purposes of this question), would you choose a lower-ivy in the US or a UK uni of Oxbridge caliber?

    Also, would failing to get a 1st at a UK uni put you out of the running for top-tier US Law Schools (regardless of LSAT)? What is a 1st equal to in terms of US gpa? Is it harder to get a 1st at a UK uni then, say, a 3.75~4.00 at a US uni?

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by iwmo)
    Thank you for the replies.

    If you were to choose a university solely on the basis of increasing your chances of getting into a US Law School (This is most definitely not the case- but let us pretend that it is for a moment for the purposes of this question), would you choose a lower-ivy in the US or a UK uni of Oxbridge caliber?
    If I had the choice between a US college/uni and a UK uni for undergrad if my aspirations were to attend law school in the US upon graduation - I would graduate from a non - ivy league institution (in your case, lower - ivy) in the US. On the basis that law schools would much rather applicants have a bachelor's degree from an accreditated US college/university though this is not a firm statement. If you have received your BA or BS degree from a US school, it's easier for you to meet admission requirements and you're much more familiar with the US style of education. Also, faculty and staff from your US college/university are in better positions to help you with gaining admission to US law schools.

    (Original post by iwmo)
    Also, would failing to get a 1st at a UK uni put you out of the running for top-tier US Law Schools (regardless of LSAT)? What is a 1st equal to in terms of US gpa? Is it harder to get a 1st at a UK uni then, say, a 3.75~4.00 at a US uni? Thanks!
    Absolutely not - if you can achieve a 1st or 2.1 degree from a UK uni, you're definitely in consideration for admission to US law schools. 1st at a UK uni equals a GPA between the range of 3.6 - 4.0 at a US uni. In regards to your second question, it's difficult to judge b/c of unforeseen circumstances.


    Hope this helps.
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    OP I am thinking of the same thing. I am definitely going to Oxbridge for undergrad and then to the US for grad school (maybe B-School not law school).

    I am fairly sure an 1st class Oxford degree would give you a fairly good shot at the very best law schools.

    And to answer your question:

    I had the choice to go to a lower ivy but I chose Cambridge. It was a very easy decision to make. Oxbridge undergrad teaching is known to be the in the world and I firmly believe that an Oxbridge degree would be better for gaining entry into US law schools that a lower ivy (if you use this opportunity well, of course). But I think the best way to ask is to maybe send Oxford or your college admission tutors about past students going to US law schools. I know that US universities have pre-law track Deans that help pre-law students with applications, taking the right courses and etc. (not sure if Oxford has one though, but probably should).
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    If the ONLY thing you cared about were getting into US law school I'd recommend going to a US school just because they will be so much better equipped for assisting you in the process. That said, if you have an Oxbridge offer the transatlantically-skewed prestige factor (Americans LOVE Oxford especially) would probably more than compensate for the relative lack of US law school experts at Oxbridge careers centres (although you'd be surprised, Harvard Law School had a recruitment event here at Cambridge lately, so evidently there is a fair bit of traffic).

    In terms of most other things, I would recommend Oxbridge, except for sports facilities which are absolutely **** at both in comparison to what most US unis will offer you.
 
 
 
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