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    Hiya

    I'm currently only in my first year at college but I'm trying to decide what to do for uni. I really like what I've heard of Cardiff (on here etc) and would really really like to do English Lit and Ancient History if I did choose it.

    Does anyone have any help/advice about either of these courses or just about the uni in general? It would be huuuugely appreciated

    Thanks :p:
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    I do Ancient History at Cardiff. In the first year (I'm in first year), there's just two modules - Introduction to Ancient Greek History and Introduction to Roman History. There's one lecture a week for each module, and 1 seminar every two weeks between them. You do one essay for January, one essay for April, and two exams in the summer. The department's lovely, I think, and there's a whole range of lecturers - they're all nice and get the job done, though I definitely prefer some to others! (Kate Gilliver = greatest.)

    As for the content of the course, well, because both modules are "Introductions", first year is a bit bare. It's interesting and all, but I'm really looking forward to next year when we can pick specific modules and do more interesting things in more depth. Have you studied Ancient History before? I, and many others, hadn't, so in that sense the introductions are good.

    I do Archaeology as a second subject and I love that. That has more specific modules... Archaeology is really good - if you're interested in it, I definitely recommend it as your third subject!

    I know a few people who do English Lit and I haven't heard dreadful things about it, but I don't really know anything about that course.

    The university itself is great, I'm glad I chose it. I don't know what things to say about it in a brief overview, but it is a really good university. Do you have any specific questions about it?

    And Cardiff the city is lovely too. Almost all's within walking distance. Walking the streets isn't a terrifying experience. I found the non-students I've met to be really lovely and friendly (obviously this is a small proportion of the population, but anyway...).

    So yeah. I definitely recommend the university and Ancient History has proved to be a good course. I wish I could be more enthusiastic about the subject, because I don't mean to put you off studying it at Cardiff, it's just that there's not really much of it to get enthusiastic about in the first year. The department is great and in years 2 and 3 there's lots to study. And it's just my personal opinion, of course.
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    (Original post by siana17)
    I do Ancient History at Cardiff. In the first year (I'm in first year), there's just two modules - Introduction to Ancient Greek History and Introduction to Roman History. There's one lecture a week for each module, and 1 seminar every two weeks between them. You do one essay for January, one essay for April, and two exams in the summer. The department's lovely, I think, and there's a whole range of lecturers - they're all nice and get the job done, though I definitely prefer some to others! (Kate Gilliver = greatest.)

    As for the content of the course, well, because both modules are "Introductions", first year is a bit bare. It's interesting and all, but I'm really looking forward to next year when we can pick specific modules and do more interesting things in more depth. Have you studied Ancient History before? I, and many others, hadn't, so in that sense the introductions are good.

    I do Archaeology as a second subject and I love that. That has more specific modules... Archaeology is really good - if you're interested in it, I definitely recommend it as your third subject!

    I know a few people who do English Lit and I haven't heard dreadful things about it, but I don't really know anything about that course.

    The university itself is great, I'm glad I chose it. I don't know what things to say about it in a brief overview, but it is a really good university. Do you have any specific questions about it?

    And Cardiff the city is lovely too. Almost all's within walking distance. Walking the streets isn't a terrifying experience. I found the non-students I've met to be really lovely and friendly (obviously this is a small proportion of the population, but anyway...).

    So yeah. I definitely recommend the university and Ancient History has proved to be a good course. I wish I could be more enthusiastic about the subject, because I don't mean to put you off studying it at Cardiff, it's just that there's not really much of it to get enthusiastic about in the first year. The department is great and in years 2 and 3 there's lots to study. And it's just my personal opinion, of course.

    Thanks so much! That was helpful beyond belief!

    I was thinking of doing archaeology instead of English but because I've never had a chance to study it I don't want to take it and find out it's really not for me, you know? But you mentioned that it's worth a look so I'll have a butcher's What's that course like?
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    First year English Lit is quite good from what I hear (a lot of my friends do it, and my girlfriend is in first year and does it too). They seem to do a wide range of literature and the lecturers are generally excellent. My girlfriend has helpfully just told me what's on the course:

    In the first term you look at a range of different types of fiction, from modern to classic fiction, and a range of poetry as well. This year, the books are Moll Flanders, North and South, Between the Acts by Virginia Woolf and Money by Martin Amis. Basically, you have to write an essay about two of the books and you have a poetry exam where you basically pick an essay question and write about any poems (in the Norton Anthology of Poetry) that fit that question. The second term is pretty similar, the books are Dracula, Rebecca, Crash, Translations (a play by Brian Friel), Oroonoko by Aphra Ben and Roger Dodsworth (a short story by Mary Shelley). You write an essay about the first three books, then have an essay and exam on the last three ("Addressing the Past" ). The exam also includes an unseen work.
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    (Original post by RightSaidJames)
    First year English Lit is quite good from what I hear (a lot of my friends do it, and my girlfriend is in first year and does it too). They seem to do a wide range of literature and the lecturers are generally excellent. My girlfriend has helpfully just told me what's on the course:

    In the first term you look at a range of different types of fiction, from modern to classic fiction, and a range of poetry as well. This year, the books are Moll Flanders, North and South, Between the Acts by Virginia Woolf and Money by Martin Amis. Basically, you have to write an essay about two of the books and you have a poetry exam where you basically pick an essay question and write about any poems (in the Norton Anthology of Poetry) that fit that question. The second term is pretty similar, the books are Dracula, Rebecca, Crash, Translations (a play by Brian Friel), Oroonoko by Aphra Ben and Roger Dodsworth (a short story by Mary Shelley). You write an essay about the first three books, then have an essay and exam on the last three ("Addressing the Past" ). The exam also includes an unseen work.
    Thank you, and thank your girlfriend!

    I have to say, I'm liking the sound of Cardiff...
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    (Original post by xlovelybonesx)
    Thanks so much! That was helpful beyond belief!

    I was thinking of doing archaeology instead of English but because I've never had a chance to study it I don't want to take it and find out it's really not for me, you know? But you mentioned that it's worth a look so I'll have a butcher's What's that course like?
    Archaeology = 2 modules in the first semester, with an essay each due in December and an exam each in January. Then 2 new modules in the second semester, with an essay each and an exam each. In the first semester (presuming that it won't change in the next two years, but it might) there's Greek and Roman Archaeology and then you have to choose between Human Origins and Ancient Egypt. In the second semester it's Prehistoric Britain and Post Roman and Medieval Britain.

    That's Archaeology A. It equals 40 credits. You need to take 120 credits in your first year, which you'd get by doing Literature, Ancient History and Arch A. But I'll tell you about Archaeology B as well, in case you prefer that...

    Arch B is the practical side of Archaeology. You have to do A to do B (as far as I'm aware) and if you want it as part of your degree you have to do both. I don't study Arch B, but my friend does so this is what I understand about it: There's lab every 2 weeks for 3 hours. I'm unsure what 'lab' means - it involves drawing graphs and sciencey stuff for which rulers, set squares and calculators are required. There are 2 lecture-based modules in the first semester, called Great Discoveries and Introduction to Archaeological Skills. Great Discoveries is about the important people in Archaeology, Skills is what it says. There's an essay and exam for Great Discoveries at the end of the first semester. Skills continues into the second semester and there's another module but I can't remember what that is. There's also a second block of something lab related for another 3 hours every two weeks but I don't know what that is. Arch B has a few field trips and you have to go on a dig over the summer.

    Back to Archaeology A, I'd never studied it before either but I figured that since I like Ancient History I'd probably like that too. Which has proved pretty much correct, except there's more non-Ancient world related stuff than I expected, but I'm finding all of that to be really interesting. We're just starting on all the Britain stuff now and I'm quite looking forward to learning more about it. Archaeology's a really enjoyable course, and it's a good introduction whilst still doing stuff in detail. The lecturers are all lovely - they're all proper history people, I think, with voices to match...

    I'm glad you like the sound of Cardiff! It is great here. I'm glad I chose it. I was kind of torn between here and Swansea... but definitely happy with my choice. I like that it's a city uni not a campus... It's good that you're so ahead of the game - I didn't really know what university's I liked the look of until it was too late for open days. You should make sure, if it's possible, that you come and have a look around.
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    (Original post by siana17)
    I'm glad you like the sound of Cardiff! It is great here. I'm glad I chose it. I was kind of torn between here and Swansea... but definitely happy with my choice. I like that it's a city uni not a campus... It's good that you're so ahead of the game - I didn't really know what university's I liked the look of until it was too late for open days. You should make sure, if it's possible, that you come and have a look around.
    Ahhh, thank you again!!

    Arch A. does sound quite a lot like what I thought it would be; definitely my cuppa tea. I'll have to do some serious thinking, but I have plenty of time, I suppose
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    Since I'm living with an Ancient History student this year, and did it as my elective last year, (and I know that Siana17 has pretty much covered *everything* about Ancient History here), I'll try and give you some advice, but it'll be pretty short:

    Ancient History first year is indeed as good as Siana17 said, though from what I've heard from my housemate it does seem to be a very popular course - I know last year the lecture theatre was pretty much full; and this year he said they barely managed to fit into their allocated room.
    What's good about it is the freedom you get with the study. It's not exactly as rigid as you'd think, at least I didn't think so. Sure, we learnt about everything from Homer's Odyssey to Alexander the Great in Intro to Greece, and from the Myth of Rome to the Fall of the Empire in Intro to Rome, but, it always seemed like because it was just an introductory framework in the lectures that we were able to branch out and explore whatever interested us during our free time.

    Essay-wise, because they really have to be mentioned properly, you do get a real range to look at. I mean, last year's questions were so varied. I wrote one essay on Helot Slavery in Sparta, and another on Constantine's Effect on Christianity in Rome, while my housemate wrote about totally different topics altogether. Even in seminars you end up with some people who have just read the set text and have their ideas, and others who have read the set text and skimmed the recommended reading and you get so many different viewpoints on one area. It's really quite a 'horizon-expanding' experience.

    Second year seems to be a lot better, but that may be due to my housemate doing an independent study rather than set modules. By that, he's got to do a presentation and almost a dissertation, but, he gets to do it on anything within reason - I think he's chosen Carthaginian warfare and the whether Carthage was actually a Threat to Rome. That's how varied and expansive the department is.


    As for Cardiff as a city, I'd be biased if I said it was brilliant. There's something for everyone. If you're into clubs there's quite a good student nightlife in the week, and then the locals join in on the weekend; if you're more into quiet nights in pubs, there are loads all across the city; if you like live music, we have more than enough venues from independent places like Clwb Ifor Bach and Buffalo which host practically unsigned acts, up to the CIA and Solus which have bigger names.
    If you're the type who likes wide-open spaces we have Bute Park, Pontcanna Field, and Roath Park all within walking distance of the city-campus, and even Alexandra Gardens right behind the main building (wedged between Main Building and the Glamorgan Building). If you're an architecture fan, we've got some gems around the city - from the Edwardian Civic Centre, through to more modern buildings popping up on The Hayes.

    As for the Uni, I have no complaints. The staff are really friendly no matter what department or building you go to. The Porters are always happy to help, and some even like a bit of banter; the lecturers are always cordial (and you'll occasionally get a hello if you're in their class...or maybe that's just the Italian and Hispanic Departments being over-friendly). There's really very little I can think of that's bad about this place...maybe the lack of things I'm looking for in the Arts&SocialStudies Library (mainly certain foreign DVDs and novels, but their history section is a treasure trove...)


    So much for keeping it short, eh?
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    (Original post by CatatonicStupor)
    So much for keeping it short, eh?
    Haha, thank you, I wouldn't have learned half as much if it was kept short. I like how flexible the course sounds

    And the city seems amazing, my kind of place.

    Cardiff is starting to sound like the place to be!
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    (Original post by CatatonicStupor)
    Ancient History first year is indeed as good as Siana17 said, though from what I've heard from my housemate it does seem to be a very popular course - I know last year the lecture theatre was pretty much full; and this year he said they barely managed to fit into their allocated room.
    Indeed! I'm amazed at how many people study it. I think it's about 160 people...? In the early lectures (when everyone would turn up), some people were sitting on the stairs... and there's an extra row of chairs at the back that's always full. It's far more popular than I expected.

    (Original post by CatatonicStupor)
    Second year seems to be a lot better, but that may be due to my housemate doing an independent study rather than set modules. By that, he's got to do a presentation and almost a dissertation, but, he gets to do it on anything within reason - I think he's chosen Carthaginian warfare and the whether Carthage was actually a Threat to Rome. That's how varied and expansive the department is.
    Ooh, really? How does that work? I've not heard of the independent study thing, but that sounds really interesting...
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    (Original post by siana17)
    Indeed! I'm amazed at how many people study it. I think it's about 160 people...? In the early lectures (when everyone would turn up), some people were sitting on the stairs... and there's an extra row of chairs at the back that's always full. It's far more popular than I expected.


    Ooh, really? How does that work? I've not heard of the independent study thing, but that sounds really interesting...
    I think it was just an option he chose. He's doing History/Ancient History, so he's doing modules on China and a few others that I can't remember for History, and then Ancient History I think he's doing stuff on Greece and Rome still, and then has his independent study module which is only for this semester.
    He's really into his history though. He's in the lounge til 11 every night reading books for his course or stuff on the side; on a daily basis. And it doesn't even seem to be books he needs to read, he just goes to the library (since he only has about 6-9 hours of contact time per week) and comes back with books, from Polybius and Plutarch to modern historians.

    Part of me wishes I was doing a course where I'd have to write more and build up my knowledge base, but, as a linguist doing three languages I find I'm doing far more oral and reading work, and I actually only have one essay to write all year...and that won't be until May. I actually envy you other Humanities students. [and the Linguists who have taken essay-based modules...]
 
 
 
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