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    I'm doing Bio Rhythms & sleep, Relationships and Eating Behaviour.. Seems like quite a few people are doing aggression!
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    I'm doing Cognition & law, moral development and mood disorders/schizophrenia
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    Aggression, Gender & Relationships
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    (Original post by aliluvschoc)
    Good luck everyone Just remember how to structure your answers.
    Structuring the essays properly is probably my downfall.. I try to plan but it just never seems to turn out well :p: Any tips?
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    So what's everyone predicting to come up?
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    Hey
    Hope everyones ready for tomorrow.
    I'm doing... Biological rhythms, aggression and relationships.
    SOOOOOOO much to learn i dont think its going to all go in before tomro morning lol.
    Tried so many revision devices but hardly any have worked. Now just literally trying to boil out all the main facts and hoping they will be still in my head tomro.
    Be my last exam though so be glad once its over

    Good luck everyone.
    and hey if we all do bad then maybe the grade boundaries will come down
    • PS Helper
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    PS Helper
    (Original post by taperjeangirl!)
    Ahh great, thanks a lot Yep, I'm trying to revise as much as I can it's just that I was worrying slightly because I don't know some things in a lot of depth. Should be okay, hopefully! S'all about the evaluation :cool:
    Yeah, it's about the evaluation. You can easily get AO1 marks putting in just good old common sense. It's remembering studies so you can get the AO2/3 points that's the tricky bit. If you're really stuck on a question, you can always pick up marks with very general evaluation for that approach, like evaluation of the biological approach.
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    Is nobody doing eye witness testimony, moral development and depression/schizophrenia?!
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    ^ me!
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    (Original post by taperjeangirl!)
    Structuring the essays properly is probably my downfall.. I try to plan but it just never seems to turn out well :p: Any tips?
    Note: I was on the AQA (I think it was A) spec.

    I never used to make a plan, but you know how to approach the essay from the title.

    Compare And Contrast

    Outline and Evaluate

    and so on.

    I always had my essays in three parts. The AO1 in the first paragraph, describing. Then the main body criticising (remember this is both positive and negative) then the last paragraph concluding and talking about implications.

    In nutshell, that's your A level Psychology essay structure. (It worked for me!)

    You have to make sure you get down the basic idea and description to get your 6 marks for AO1, but this shouldn't make up more than about a third or less of your essay. (Outline, describe, compare)

    Most of the marks should come from evaluation, criticism (contrast, evaluate, criticise), this is your AO2 mark (eg: on the AQA paper, the 18 mark question is AO1 - 6 marks, AO2 - 12 marks).

    Throw in as many criticisms as you can think of. (Not necessarily negative)


    Most of your AO2 will come from criticising the actual support for theories you're evaluating. That is, the studies you've learned.


    The basics - In terms of criticising experiments supporting the theory:

    Can it be generalised? Were the participants all male? White? Middle class? American?

    Was it realistic? Was it in a lab? Did they have to sleep with electrodes on?

    Is it mundane? Was it just like everyday experience?

    Were the participants giving true results? Could they have guessed the aims? Were the same participants used twice? Were the experimenters unknowingly treating a certain group differently for some reason?

    Think of any factor that could have influenced/skewed results. Time. Personality. Age. Gender. Confusion. Hunger. Tiredness.


    The actual theories/models need to be criticised too. Are they too simple? Can they apply to everyone? Are they reductionist? Do they over complicate? Are they based on facts that may not even be true?

    And for all these, did the experimenters use reasonable means to combat this. If not, would you say the experiments and studies are sufficient support for the theory/model/concept? Begin to conclude the whole essay here.


    Finally, (they love this), what are the implications? (Only a couple of sentences on this).


    Think of anything. Politicians agreeing on global warming, sexism in the workplace, boys being good at maths. pull anything out of your arse, you won't be marked down from it.


    I generally got 17/18, 18/18 for these essays, they're not challenging provided you know the details of the theories, and the supporting studies.


    It's a bit of a memory game, but good luck!
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    is this for psych a or b ...im doing b and i hope grade boundaries low....genereally in janiary mudles they usualy are soo lets hope adn fingers crossed it si a good paper
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    I've been told that all the essay questions this year are AO1- 4 marks and then AO2- 8 marks
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    (Original post by Rainbow1992)
    I've been told that all the essay questions this year are AO1- 4 marks and then AO2- 8 marks
    I was on the old AQA system, but it still stands.

    More evaluation than description.

    edit: I remember this is where most people would lose marks in our class (and from the examiners reports, a lot of people still do this in the exam)


    Don't spend too much time describing.
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    (Original post by aliluvschoc)
    Finally, (they love this), what are the implications? (Only a couple of sentences on this).


    Think of anything. Politicians agreeing on global warming, sexism in the workplace, boys being good at maths. pull anything out of your arse, you won't be marked down from it.


    I generally got 17/18, 18/18 for these essays, they're not challenging provided you know the details of the theories, and the supporting studies.


    It's a bit of a memory game, but good luck!
    I'm probably just being daft. but what do you mean by implications?
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    (Original post by pl,okmijn)
    I'm probably just being daft. but what do you mean by implications?
    How does this help us in real life? Is it useful in real life?


    After all, Psychology isn't just about how people perform in experiments.

    (This is probably the least important part of your essay, but worth a mention.)

    Edit: When talking about Eye Witness Testimony, if you're doing that paper, this is more important here.
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    (Original post by aliluvschoc)
    I never used to make a plan, but you know how to approach the essay from the title.

    Compare And Contrast

    Outline and Evaluate

    and so on.

    I always had my essays in three parts. The AO1 in the first paragraph, describing. Then the main body criticising (remember this is both positive and negative) then the last paragraph concluding and talking about implications.

    In nutshell, that's your A level Psychology essay structure. (It worked for me!)

    You have to make sure you get down the basic idea and description to get your 6 marks for AO1, but this shouldn't make up more than about a third or less of your essay. (Outline, describe, compare)

    Most of the marks should come from evaluation, criticism (contrast, evaluate, criticise), this is your AO2 mark (eg: on the AQA paper, the 18 mark question is AO1 - 6 marks, AO2 - 12 marks).

    Throw in as many criticisms as you can think of. (Not necessarily negative)


    Most of your AO2 will come from criticising the actual support for theories you're evaluating. That is, the studies you've learned.


    The basics - In terms of criticising experiments supporting the theory:

    Can it be generalised? Were the participants all male? White? Middle class? American?

    Was it realistic? Was it in a lab? Did they have to sleep with electrodes on?

    Is it mundane? Was it just like everyday experience?

    Were the participants giving true results? Could they have guessed the aims? Were the same participants used twice? Were the experimenters unknowingly treating a certain group differently for some reason?

    Think of any factor that could have influenced/skewed results. Time. Personality. Age. Gender. Confusion. Hunger. Tiredness.


    The actual theories/models need to be criticised too. Are they too simple? Can they apply to everyone? Are they reductionist? Do they over complicate? Are they based on facts that may not even be true?

    And for all these, did the experimenters use reasonable means to combat this. If not, would you say the experiments and studies are sufficient support for the theory/model/concept? Begin to conclude the whole essay here.


    Finally, (they love this), what are the implications? (Only a couple of sentences on this).


    Think of anything. Politicians agreeing on global warming, sexism in the workplace, boys being good at maths. pull anything out of your arse, you won't be marked down from it.


    I generally got 17/18, 18/18 for these essays, they're not challenging provided you know the details of the theories, and the supporting studies.


    It's a bit of a memory game, but good luck!
    This is really helpful, thanks a lot Means it's time for some more essay practice.. joy!
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    (Original post by taperjeangirl!)
    This is really helpful, thanks a lot Means it's time for some more essay practice.. joy!

    I enjoyed the essay questions the most. I'm probably just weird though!

    And I'm going back to writing my essay on Gender development now.


    :sigh:


    xx
 
 
 
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