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Do teachers have any authority anymore? watch

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    I really don't think there's any other way than re-introducing corporal punishment. At least then there would be a final consequence for the utter *********.
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    (Original post by TKC)
    I really don't think there's any other way than re-introducing corporal punishment. At least then there would be a final consequence for the utter *********.
    Tbh I think it wouldn't work in this day and age - they would hit back...
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    Its a left wing principle, what else is there to say? :dontknow:
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    (Original post by musicbaserich)
    I agree, but I think its a problem that also extends further into society and doesn't just involve the school but parents aswell. From my experience, the situation is better on the continent than in the UK...
    I completely agree that it extands further than education :yep: I honestly think that because of this lack of authority problems are going to spiral further out of control before they are dealt with.

    (Original post by TomandJerry09)
    I think its problems with parents as much as anything else. In the end of the day, its a parents responsibility to teach there kids how to respect people, as well as other traditional values. If a kid misbehaves in school, and there parents turn a blind eye, then theres not a lot the school can do. Young children learn how to behave at home, and are going to do what there parents teach them, not the school.
    I absolutely agree that parents need to be consistent with discipline, and I understand that a lack of this/ support/ care etc can lead to problems in school. I don't, however, believe that we should sit back and blame parents whilst teachers are being looked down on and students are missing out on education. Something really needs to be done and it worries me that nothing seems to be in progress. It's as if it's being swept under the carpets.
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    (Original post by EdwardCurrent)
    The "trouble-makers" used to brighten my day, which would otherwise have been an exercise in pure monotony and tedium. You tell us how completely and utterly outraged you are that kids are excluded because that's just what they want, dammit, but then start frothing that they be given "help" or removed from classrooms. Just what do you suggest? A return to the good old days when teachers could forcibly detain kids for hours or spank them with sticks? A very long post of little substance, but there's always got to be someone frothing at the mouth about something so it might as well have been you today.

    In fact, the roots of any problem are in compulsory education and public education/national curricula. The moment we stop forcing parents to send their children to school, stop forcing children into a one-size-fits-all mold and driving standards down with government dictatorship over education, then we can start to make progress.
    I apologise if it didn;t come across how it was intended. Ill + angry makes for a very poor account :o:

    The point I was trying to make is that the punishment these students are given do not actually punish them. It's as if they make life easier for them when they cause uproar in the classroom. I'm actually quite happy for them to be removed from the classroom, but knowing that where I work they are given refreshments and a nice person to console them just makes me fume. It is obvious that they will continue to cause disruption lesson after lesson, which is it what annoys me. The fact that they get help and refreshments is much less of an issue in my eyes, it's the fact that it encourages further classroom disruption.

    To add, I'm not sure what I'd suggest. Talking to teachers has highlighted just how difficult it is to enforce discipline with all the political correctness and human rights. Surely there is something though? I guess I was hoping to vent and maybe uproot a few ideas in the process. However, it turned into more of a rant
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    (Original post by The Referee)
    Aw, come on...why should a teacher attempt to enforce discipline or respect? After all, it's not the student's fault that they have no manner, respect or a basic understanding of boundaries - they are just the victims of a bad home life/misunderstood/have 'problems'. It's just not realistic to expect these children to learn how to behave appropriately, it's against their human rights to be punished for incorrect conduct! (Sarcasm...kind of, there's too much that has a hint of accuracy about it though)

    Teachers do not have the authority that they need, they are also lacking the support of those higher than them in the hierarchy. Teachers and teaching as a profession used to be respected, now it's a joke...but that fits with the curriculum!
    I appreciate that poor home life/ lack of support/ discipline/ consistency is a common between trouble-makers and I can relate to how this affects their behaviour in the classroom. But why should the poor upbringing of one student be allowed to affect a class full of students plus the teacher? I guess I just feel sorry for the students who desperately want the education and value all the time that they get with the teacher. As I've said before, the 'punishment' in most cases hardly discourages the behaviour and this leads to further classroom disruptions.

    Oh and another thing I've heard recently. A small group of trouble-makers were put into a little project after being permanently removed from regular lessons due to misbehaving. Their little project (and I mean little), if completed acceptably, would be worth 2 GCSEs. It's funny how behaviour in regular lessons deteriorated when the students heard of this. I mean come on, if this doesn't encourage 'can't be arsed' kids to get chucked out the class then what does?
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    (Original post by shorty.loves.angels)
    I appreciate that poor home life/ lack of support/ discipline/ consistency is a common between trouble-makers and I can relate to how this affects their behaviour in the classroom. But why should the poor upbringing of one student be allowed to affect a class full of students plus the teacher? I guess I just feel sorry for the students who desperately want the education and value all the time that they get with the teacher. As I've said before, the 'punishment' in most cases hardly discourages the behaviour and this leads to further classroom disruptions.

    Oh and another thing I've heard recently. A small group of trouble-makers were put into a little project after being permanently removed from regular lessons due to misbehaving. Their little project (and I mean little), if completed acceptably, would be worth 2 GCSEs. It's funny how behaviour in regular lessons deteriorated when the students heard of this. I mean come on, if this doesn't encourage 'can't be arsed' kids to get chucked out the class then what does?
    Excuse me? Are you for real about this project thing? That's just crazy!

    Uniforms, discipline, expectations and consequences...these were the hall marks of the excellent education I had and it's why the school I went to is one of the best in the country. Poor behaviour should not be rewarded with easy 'GCSE' type awards, it should be censured and corrected in specialist teaching establishments that are equipped to deal with these human horrors!
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    Bring back corporal punishment!
    So many children these days (I know I sound condescending, but I'm seventeen!) don't have any repect for teachers and/or their role. It's completely selfish to disrupt classes. If you want to act like a performing moneky, live in the zoo.

    However, it's not only the fact that the teachers no longer have as many measures at their disposal, it's also that attitudes towards teachers have greatly changed.
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    (Original post by The Referee)
    Excuse me? Are you for real about this project thing? That's just crazy!

    Uniforms, discipline, expectations and consequences...these were the hall marks of the excellent education I had and it's why the school I went to is one of the best in the country. Poor behaviour should not be rewarded with easy 'GCSE' type awards, it should be censured and corrected in specialist teaching establishments that are equipped to deal with these human horrors!
    I know, it's apalling. I realise that they are trying to encourage some form of learning but students and parents (of those students who work damn hard for grades) are outraged. I guess the only saving grace, hopefully, is that these trouble-makers are less likely to utilise these grades and therefore not end up competingwith hard-working students for jobs. I belive the scheme is something called skills force, or similar - if you wanted to check me up on it.
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    (Original post by Echo_Foxtrot)
    Bring back corporal punishment!
    So many children these days (I know I sound condescending, but I'm seventeen!) don't have any repect for teachers and/or their role. It's completely selfish to disrupt classes. If you want to act like a performing moneky, live in the zoo.

    However, it's not only the fact that the teachers no longer have as many measures at their disposal, it's also that attitudes towards teachers have greatly changed.
    You're right it is selfish and in some ways it seems that corporal punishment is one of the only tactics which worked. However, I don't think we'll ever see that brought back. It's against human rights to even tap a child on the bum nowadays.

    (Btw I'm only 21 )
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    (Original post by shorty.loves.angels)
    You're right it is selfish and in some ways it seems that corporal punishment is one of the only tactics which worked. However, I don't think we'll ever see that brought back. It's against human rights to even tap a child on the bum nowadays.

    (Btw I'm only 21 )
    Stupid namby pamby people :rolleyes: I've known people in my school who've only had to make the smallest complaint to their parents before they ring up the school and the headmaster will automatically apologise profusely for fear of upsetting the parents. It's so rediculous. However, I've digressed.

    Sorry, I phrased that badly about my age. I meant it in a way that I knew I was young and didn't mean to sound condescending!
 
 
 
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