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    Mainly directed at those not of faith or belief in the divine.

    Where do you get your sense of morality from?

    Do you understand that this is based on arbitrary limits you or society have constructed?

    Does the lack of a basis mean these values are bendable and are they adjustable to suit your whims and desires? Why not?
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    Nick Griffin
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    I more or less make it up as I go along - just do what feels right at the time.
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    (Original post by reems23)
    Where do you get your sense of morality from?

    Do you understand that this is based on arbitrary limits you or society have constructed?

    Does the lack of a basis mean these values are bendable and are they adjustable to suit your whims and desires? Why not?
    To my mind, it is merely a case of deciding a code of conduct that is useful for individuals and society to adopt if they want to achieve their goals in life. He naturally want good things for ourselves - and those we care about - and we adopt a code to help achieve that. That goal is partially based on intuitions we have naturally, but it combines with our ability to reason about the world.

    I wouldn't say the goal is entirely arbitrary. It is a goal almost all humans share. That fact allows us to cooperate with others and achieve a happiness that we could not achieve if we only worked alone. It's ability to be understood and shared by almost all others makes it a sensible goal. It is what many people want, while other goals are not necessarily what people want. That people work towards that they want isn't arbitrary; it's a natural progression.

    The code of conduct can change depending on a society and its nature. It might be seen as a contract: I act in a particular way so that you act in a particular way, and by us both doing that we achieve something for each other that we could not achieve if we worked on our own. Those who violate the code are punished by society, because violators are seen as a threat to the contract, and hence to the shared happiness. It's self-serving but, contrary to the negative portrayal one might see of self-serving activity in Christianity and Islam (although a questionable portrayal, given that selfless activity on earth earns, in the eyes of believers, eternal rewards in the afterlife!), I don't think that's necessarily a bad thing. Heck, many people gain happiness from making other people happy. A community which is based greatly on ideas of self-interest can, I suggest, be one in which most people win and be happy. Self-interest does not necessarily lead to a lifestyle that is detrimental to those around you. Your "whims and desires" may synchronise with their whims and desires, to both your advantages and, ultimately, to the happiness of you and those with whom you interact.
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    (Original post by superwolf)
    I more or less make it up as I go along - just do what feels right at the time.
    This. I get my morality from my own experiences, doing what I think is right based on what I've seen, felt and experienced in the past.
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    Drawing upon my common sense, past experiences, knowledge, conscience and judgment.
    Showing respect where it's due, treating myself with respect. Treating others as I would wish to be treated.
    I actually find some of the christians whom I have encountered to be insincere and disingenuous, as though they are only behaving in a certain way because of their faith rather than in a more genuine, meaningful way.
    I much prefer atheists, at least you know when they're being kind or friendly there's no hidden agenda.
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    The Simpsons.
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    Morality did exist before either testament of the bible was written. Those writings reflected the morality of the time. Generally speaking, unless it is an extreme situation, members of one species of animal don't kill members of the same species. If they do then it's usually due to hunger or to protect their territory. I believe that it's an instinct that helps preserve the species, an instinct that humans also posses. That instinct has led us to create cultural prohibitions against murder, prohibitions that probably go back to when humans were still hunter gatherers. Bottom line is religion didn't create morality, it was more the other way around. Religion was an expression of and refinement of our social norms. Over time religion and culture and law became so intertwined that it is impossible to separate them.

    I essentially think evolution is the driving force behind it. If something improves the chances of survival or an individual or species then it is deemed 'good' ~ thus morality comes!
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    This. I get my morality from my own experiences, doing what I think is right based on what I've seen, felt and experienced in the past.
    What about experiences of your parents and those you know? Would you say they sort of pass on morality?
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    The Koran says, i follow. :king1:
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    (Original post by Lefty Leo)
    The Koran says, i follow. :king1:
    *throws the Koran*

    Go and fetch!
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    Number of moles divived by volume

    Wait...
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    (Original post by Lord Hysteria)
    What about experiences of your parents and those you know? Would you say they sort of pass on morality?
    At a young age, yes. As a child, for instance, I was taught that stealing was wrong for no other reason than 'it is'.

    I'd say as you get older, your morality becomes more reasoned, and more your own. I still don't steal, but more so now because I know it's wrong for a specific reason. Likewise, some of the morals my mum would've pushed onto me are ones that I now see completely differently - her sense of entitlement, for instance, and her unwillingness to help or work with others.
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    TV... oh dear that explains a lot!!! :p:
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    I wouldn't say morality is 'decided on'. It just 'is'.
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    To my mind, it is merely a case of deciding a code of conduct that is useful for individuals and society to adopt if they want to achieve their goals in life. He naturally want good things for ourselves - and those we care about - and we adopt a code to help achieve that. That goal is partially based on intuitions we have naturally, but it combines with our ability to reason about the world.

    I wouldn't say the goal is entirely arbitrary. It is a goal almost all humans share. That fact allows us to cooperate with others and achieve a happiness that we could not achieve if we only worked alone. It's ability to be understood and shared by almost all others makes it a sensible goal. It is what many people want, while other goals are not necessarily what people want. That people work towards that they want isn't arbitrary; it's a natural progression.

    The code of conduct can change depending on a society and its nature. It might be seen as a contract: I act in a particular way so that you act in a particular way, and by us both doing that we achieve something for each other that we could not achieve if we worked on our own. Those who violate the code are punished by society, because violators are seen as a threat to the contract, and hence to the shared happiness. It's self-serving but, contrary to the negative portrayal one might see of self-serving activity in Christianity and Islam (although a questionable portrayal, given that selfless activity on earth earns, in the eyes of believers, eternal rewards in the afterlife!), I don't think that's necessarily a bad thing. Heck, many people gain happiness from making other people happy. A community which is based greatly on ideas of self-interest can, I suggest, be one in which most people win and be happy. Self-interest does not necessarily lead to a lifestyle that is detrimental to those around you. Your "whims and desires" may synchronise with their whims and desires, to both your advantages and, ultimately, to the happiness of you and those with whom you interact.
    If I put 'fascinating' it would sound facetious, but that is exactly what I thought when I read this.
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    (Original post by Lord Hysteria)
    Morality did exist before either testament of the bible was written. Those writings reflected the morality of the time. Generally speaking, unless it is an extreme situation, members of one species of animal don't kill members of the same species. If they do then it's usually due to hunger or to protect their territory. I believe that it's an instinct that helps preserve the species, an instinct that humans also posses. That instinct has led us to create cultural prohibitions against murder, prohibitions that probably go back to when humans were still hunter gatherers. Bottom line is religion didn't create morality, it was more the other way around. Religion was an expression of and refinement of our social norms. Over time religion and culture and law became so intertwined that it is impossible to separate them.

    I essentially think evolution is the driving force behind it. If something improves the chances of survival or an individual or species then it is deemed 'good' ~ thus morality comes!
    If we take murder to be an example, I would suggest that 'not to murder' isn't an intrinsic part of society. There have been many examples in history where murder has been perfectly legitimate, the romans murdered their gladiators, army's murdered their war slaves and felt no guilt about it. The human life's intrinsic value isn't universal, and so it isn't in our DNA essentially to be good. I believe Kolya is more correct here. Morality is nothing more than a social contract that has been imprinted into our subconscious.
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    (Original post by LawBore)
    I wouldn't say morality is 'decided on'. It just 'is'.
    But it is ever changing and each individual has their own understanding of what is right and wrong. Surely there is no constant?
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    (Original post by reems23)
    Mainly directed at those not of faith or belief in the divine.

    Where do you get your sense of morality from?

    Do you understand that this is based on arbitrary limits you or society have constructed?

    Does the lack of a basis mean these values are bendable and are they adjustable to suit your whims and desires? Why not?

    Imagine the confusion I created when I became a sub.


    My morals? They don't really exist, and when they do, they exist to serve a purpose.
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    (Original post by Reems)

    My morals? They don't really exist, and when they do, they exist to serve a purpose.
    Of course they exist. You have a concept of right and wrong, of what's good and what's not. You don't kill, steal, murder, you don't be rude in public, you don't gob, you don't punch a girl in the ****. I'm tired of the 'I don't have any Morals' brigade, because everyone has morals, you just look like a moron when you say so. And so you would suggest that society has given you these morals? Then what do you think stops you stepping out of line and doing something against your own free will?

    Read Kolya's post. It's mega-interesting.
 
 
 
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