Rear Window-Alfred Hitchcock Watch

BelieveInMagic
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#1
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I am really struggling with writing essays on media. my teacher is shocking, and he wont give me any decent notes. All we have done is about the opening scene-which is of course exsquisit. But i really don't see what the big del with this film is, or how to discuss it in an essay??
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hobnob
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Well, what sort of essay do you have to write?
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BelieveInMagic
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I need to be prepared for any questions-more than likely on how amazing the director is and the mise on scen (or what ever it is)

I would really appreciate any help!!!
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hobnob
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(Original post by BelieveInMagic)
I need to be prepared for any questions-more than likely on how amazing the director is and the mise on scen (or what ever it is)

I would really appreciate any help!!!
Well, I know the film reasonably well, but I can only help you if you tell me what precisely you need help with.:dontknow:
I mean, I'm more than happy to discuss a couple of scenes with you, but for obvious reasons I can't actually write your essay for you (and I wouldn't want to do that anyway)...

Mise en scene is a fairly broad term that includes pretty much anything (i.e. lighting, colour, music, perspective, camera movement, how the screen is divided and so on), so if you want to do that, you kind of need to pick your scenes first and have an idea of what you're going to argue. You'll really need some kind of key argument, because "Alfred Hitchcock is an amazing director" isn't going to cut it. You'll at least have to refine it to "Alfred Hitchcock is an amazing director because of the way he uses lighting to create suspense", or whatever.
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BelieveInMagic
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no no no i totally wasn't expecting anyone to write an essay. I've looked through loads of past papers and one of the most frequent questions are on a key scene. Do you thinhk the 1st scene would be the best to use?? and should relate it to the rest of the film? like the start scene is similar to the end sequence?
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hobnob
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(Original post by BelieveInMagic)
no no no i totally wasn't expecting anyone to write an essay. I've looked through loads of past papers and one of the most frequent questions are on a key scene. Do you thinhk the 1st scene would be the best to use?? and should relate it to the rest of the film? like the start scene is similar to the end sequence?
Which scene do you mean, the bit right at the beginning, with the camera panning across the flat? I'm not sure whether you could really call that a key scene... I mean, obviously it's important, but it's not actually one of the scenes which first spring to mind when you think of the film, is it? The main reason why it's important is because it's the first scene and it sets the stage for the rest of the film and introduces the main character without having to use any clumsy dialogue.:dontknow:
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Jazzmynne
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I'd say a key scene for sure is when Lisa (Grace Kelly) introduces herself. I don't know if you've got to that yet, though, I'd say it's about 20 minutes or so in.

It's definitely sexual (the slo-mo lean in, leading into the kiss), plus the way she switches on the lights while saying her name is very attractive and very well done. Also ties in with Hitchcock's continuing theme of having cool blondes in his films.
Having Lisa within the film also sets up the relationship between her and Jeff (Jimmy Stewart), and how it affects everything going on in the courtyard.

If you need any more help let me know it's one of my favourite films but I've never properly analysed it or anything like that.
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BelieveInMagic
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(Original post by hobnob)
Which scene do you mean, the bit right at the beginning, with the camera panning across the flat? I'm not sure whether you could really call that a key scene... I mean, obviously it's important, but it's not actually one of the scenes which first spring to mind when you think of the film, is it? The main reason why it's important is because it's the first scene and it sets the stage for the rest of the film and introduces the main character without having to use any clumsy dialogue.:dontknow:

Yeah, it has the thermometer which shows frustration because of the heat, and at the end the thermometer is cooler, and Jeffries is happier and the whole mood is more relaxed. My teacher said it was like one of the best scenes to do it on but i'm struggling to fill an entire essay on only that scene as it basically establishes who jeffries is and nothing else
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hobnob
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(Original post by BelieveInMagic)
Yeah, it has the thermometer which shows frustration because of the heat, and at the end the thermometer is cooler, and Jeffries is happier and the whole mood is more relaxed. My teacher said it was like one of the best scenes to do it on but i'm struggling to fill an entire essay on only that scene as it basically establishes who jeffries is and nothing else
Yes, that's kind of what I meant...
OK, how about going for one of the scenes which actually involve the building of suspense in some form? That would allow you to talk about all the different things through which that suspense is achieved. The two most obvious scenes to use for that would be the scene in which Lisa examines the flower beds and then climbs into the flat and the famous showdown-scene, starting with the phonecall. They're both important moments within the story, yet they're also kind of self-contained, and they're not really dialogue-driven (actually silence is probably one of the means through which suspense is being created), which should make them easier to analyse, because you won't be too tempted to talk too much about who is saying what.
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BelieveInMagic
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okay. I will have a look at that scene and make some notes up for it. Thanks for helping
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