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    Can any second/third years please post where they did there spring programme, and any tips on the process before (how to make sure you get the place) and during (what to do and what not to do) the application process...

    Also any first years - have you got a place in any yet? Being interviewed?

    Im mainly looking at the Financial ones like spring programmes in banks etc.
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    goldman.

    but i am just that awesome.

    and no coz i fluked it so cant really say anything except write an awesome cover letter. and i mean awesome.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    goldman.

    but i am just that awesome.

    and no coz i fluked it so cant really say anything except write an awesome cover letter. and i mean awesome.
    rated

    straight econ? Ec+Maths?
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    (Original post by irfy)
    rated

    straight econ? Ec+Maths?
    rated?

    and no i do EME.
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    come on LSE Alumini / 2nd years / 3rd years... all us first years would really appreciate some advice.
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    (Original post by LSEactuary)
    come on LSE Alumini / 2nd years / 3rd years... all us first years would really appreciate some advice.
    the word is 'alumni'...clearly a non-math course would've done you good, but i guess intellectual curiosity (and basic command of the english language) is overrated when it comes to the headlong pursuit of $$$ at this school
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    (Original post by bobby_Zz)
    the word is 'alumni'...clearly a non-math course would've done you good, but i guess intellectual curiosity (and basic command of the english language) is overrated when it comes to the headlong pursuit of $$$ at this school
    lol.

    you may be rude but at least your priorities right.
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    (Original post by bobby_Zz)
    the word is 'alumni'...clearly a non-math course would've done you good, but i guess intellectual curiosity (and basic command of the english language) is overrated when it comes to the headlong pursuit of $$$ at this school
    Quite. It's actually ridiculous to be honest with you - I can't count the number of times I have literally just met someone (occasionally while drunk on a night out) and, without them knowing anything about me, assume my compliance in their blinkered pursuit of a faceless job in the City by asking 'oh you're a second year! Where have you applied for internships?'

    It makes me sad. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by bobby_Zz)
    the word is 'alumni'...clearly a non-math course would've done you good, but i guess intellectual curiosity (and basic command of the english language) is overrated when it comes to the headlong pursuit of $$$ at this school
    I mistyped a word - so sue me...
    (and talk about jumping to conclusions - you know nothing about my academic history.)
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    (Original post by DannyBoy123)
    Quite. It's actually ridiculous to be honest with you - I can't count the number of times I have literally just met someone (occasionally while drunk on a night out) and, without them knowing anything about me, assume my compliance in their blinkered pursuit of a faceless job in the City by asking 'oh you're a second year! Where have you applied for internships?'

    It makes me sad. :rolleyes:
    why? What's wrong with sharing your internship experiences with other people?
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    (Original post by LSEactuary)
    why? What's wrong with sharing your internship experiences with other people?
    no offense but can you not read? there is a difference between sharing and asking random people "where you apply to".

    the world evolves around more than making money, which lets face it, is the only motivator for banking (and dont spout the BS of it being fascinating and fast-paced and the rest that interviewers want to hear).
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    (Original post by danny111)
    no offense but can you not read? there is a difference between sharing and asking random people "where you apply to".

    the world evolves around more than making money, which lets face it, is the only motivator for banking (and dont spout the BS of it being fascinating and fast-paced and the rest that interviewers want to hear).
    fair enough... lets change the thread then to '2nd/3rd years... share your experiences with us first years'

    your right about money being the main motivator - however i know some people on TSR who also enjoy the work...
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    (Original post by LSEactuary)
    fair enough... lets change the thread then to '2nd/3rd years... share your experiences with us first years'

    your right about money being the main motivator - however i know some people on TSR who also enjoy the work...
    i have nothing against banking per se, nor against making money in general. i'm neither saint francis nor karl marx.

    it's just for some people, their entire lives revolve around £$£$, such that they never take a non-econ course; they have few non-finance related interests; they spend 99% of their time either in econ class or in the econ or finance or w/e society (all while applying for banking internships), thinking talking and dreaming money. the absorption in that is total, and that's a negative thing.

    why is that a bad thing?

    by way of an answer, here's a story: i read an article where the archbishop of canterbury or somebody criticized tony blair for never suffering from self-doubt. he said blair ought to read dostoevsky so blair could get a bit more of an understanding about what it means to question oneself and to not always be right/correct in their own mind, could learn to understand what it feels like to potentially be wrong. the basic point is tony blair either thinks he's perfect or, more likely, just doesn't really think about the consequences of his own actions. i feel like very few people at LSE feel much in the way of self-doubt either. they rarely question their own motives, or consider the big questions, or think about much of anything other than how to get money.

    you're never going to get a better understanding of all those things in an econ/finance course, except for the very last one
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    (Original post by bobby_Zz)
    you're never going to get a better understanding of all those things in an econ/finance course, except for the very last one
    Have you ever taken an economics course?
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    (Original post by bobby_Zz)
    i have nothing against banking per se, nor against making money in general. i'm neither saint francis nor karl marx.

    it's just for some people, their entire lives revolve around £$£$, such that they never take a non-econ course; they have few non-finance related interests; they spend 99% of their time either in econ class or in the econ or finance or w/e society (all while applying for banking internships), thinking talking and dreaming money. the absorption in that is total, and that's a negative thing.

    why is that a bad thing?

    by way of an answer, here's a story: i read an article where the archbishop of canterbury or somebody criticized tony blair for never suffering from self-doubt. he said blair ought to read dostoevsky so blair could get a bit more of an understanding about what it means to question oneself and to not always be right/correct in their own mind, could learn to understand what it feels like to potentially be wrong. the basic point is tony blair either thinks he's perfect or, more likely, just doesn't really think about the consequences of his own actions. i feel like very few people at LSE feel much in the way of self-doubt either. they rarely question their own motives, or consider the big questions, or think about much of anything other than how to get money.

    you're never going to get a better understanding of all those things in an econ/finance course, except for the very last one
    motives = incentives, yes?

    i always thought economics was about incentives. maybe i wasted almost 2 years of study already.

    anyway you are wrong. the people you describe are those people that complain when a module doesnt "teach you how to make money". that is the disgusting part.

    economics can potentially teach you that, but only if you let it.

    the rest of your post is very accurate however.
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    (Original post by Swayum)
    Have you ever taken an economics course?
    no. the general impression i get from interacting with econ majors - at LSE and elsewhere - is what informs my opinion about econ as a major, and the motivations/outlook of those who tend to choose it.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    motives = incentives, yes?

    i always thought economics was about incentives. maybe i wasted almost 2 years of study already.

    anyway you are wrong. the people you describe are those people that complain when a module doesnt "teach you how to make money". that is the disgusting part.

    economics can potentially teach you that, but only if you let it.

    the rest of your post is very accurate however.
    incentives != motives. incentives are the good things which accrue to you from pursuing a particular course of action. motives are the consequences of pursuing a course of action without carrying good/bad connotations.

    people don't always do things purely because tangible good things will result from them (i.e. incentives move them to choose this course of action because of the drawbacks of the other courses). for instance, let's take major selection. the incentives to choose an economics major are, well, higher earnings potential. nevertheless i choose history - why? what are the incentives? there aren't really any. so my motivations must be different, intangibles or abstract. i find history more intellectually stimulating which motivates my choosing it as a major, despite the fact that econ brings more tangible rewards ('incentives').
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    (Original post by bobby_Zz)
    no. the general impression i get from interacting with econ majors - at LSE and elsewhere - is what informs my opinion about econ as a major, and the motivations/outlook of those who tend to choose it.
    which is?
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    (Original post by danny111)
    which is?
    ...what i laid out 2 posts or so ago.
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    Hi, I am a second year student at Sciences Po in the Europe-Asia program. My university has an exchange agreement (on the General Course) with the LSE. But in my case it would be a bit unique because mine is a three-year undergraduate degree and, so in essence, after the completion of my third year, potentially at LSE, I would have graduated from my home institution (Sciences Po).
    In such a scenario, I had some queries concerning the General Course:

    a) Is the General Course at par with other courses offered at LSE to usual undergraduates
    b) How would you assess the teaching and guidance on the General Course, particularly in Law, Economics
    c) What are the networking opportunities offered by the General Course over the duration of the year, in particular among General Course students (since I reckon there are over 300 each year)
    d) Importantly, how well would one, as a General Course student, be able to utilize the Careers Service desk at LSE for potential full-time employment opportunities after the completion of the year

    Please try and help at the earliest since I have to hand over my year-abroad options to Sciences Po very soon. Thank you very much.


    Kishan R. Kumar
 
 
 
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