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    How hard is it for LmetBS undergrads to get into MS Financial courses at the top unis in the UK - Oxbridge, LSE, IC and Warwick? I am one and am really curious how these unis look at LMet diplomas? Any suggestions or observations? Cheers!!!
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    To be honest i would have thought very difficult unless you got a first? Metropolitian universities arent the best so going from the lower end of the ranking to the top 5 is very difficult. There are many people of course who will already be at these universities at undergraduate as well, which would give them an advantage.
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    (Original post by nakata)
    How hard is it for LmetBS undergrads to get into MS Financial courses at the top unis in the UK - Oxbridge, LSE, IC and Warwick? I am one and am really curious how these unis look at LMet diplomas? Any suggestions or observations? Cheers!!!
    Hard but definitely not impossible. If you have or can ensure you obtain a good first then it's not likely to be a show-stopper. The chances at 2.1 or below are considerably slimmer and perhaps zero given the prevailing oversubscription of top 5 programmes.
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    Hi Nakata,

    I would first advise you to take caution of the advice given before me, particularly as the knowledge of higher education from the likes of 'Will1692', probably do not extend beyond the norms of this forum.

    All you need to do is take note of the entry requirements for the given postgraduate course. If you meet the requirements, put in an application. The universities you have mentioned are highly competitive, if you were to apply you'll need to be well-rounded, with your academic studies supported with relevant experience. Business courses are particularly competitive and its often the case that good applicants are turned down.

    There are many people on this forum including myself who have experience of the postgraduate application process and have applied from new universities, to traditional universities, and vice versa and have been successful.
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    (Original post by ToneUK)
    Hi Nakata,

    I would first advise you to take caution of the advice given before me, particularly as the knowledge of higher education from the likes of 'Will1692', probably do not extend beyond the norms of this forum.
    .
    I dont think there was any need for him to be cautious of my advice. He shouldnt think its going to be easy. In the nicest possible way, surely he would already be at a better university currently if he had the "well-rounded" skills etc?
    If Oxford graduates can get instant rejections for postgrad stuff at LSE etc, then surely they would barely even consider someone at a metropolitian with less than a 2:1?
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    (Original post by Will1692)
    I dont think there was any need for him to be cautious of my advice. He shouldnt think its going to be easy. In the nicest possible way, surely he would already be at a better university currently if he had the "well-rounded" skills etc?
    If Oxford graduates can get instant rejections for postgrad stuff at LSE etc, then surely they would barely even consider someone at a metropolitian with less than a 2:1?
    I never implied that it was going to be easy. Your assumptions on admissions for postgraduate courses are quite cavalier. What I refer to by 'well-rounded skills' are experiences you gain whilst at university, experiences i.e. internships, placements, dissertations. These factors are not exclusive to Oxbridge candidates.

    You obviously need to meet the admissions critieria in the first place, so no, they would not be considered with less than a 2:1. I can appreciate in our culture there is a natural bias towards prestigious universities, but in terms of postgraduate courses it is the factors discussed which ultimately decide suitability.
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    (Original post by ToneUK)
    Hi Nakata, I would first advise you to take caution of the advice given before me, particularly as the knowledge of higher education from the likes of 'Will1692', probably do not extend beyond the norms of this forum.
    This is good advice in general - take caution of anything you read online. Now if we're done trying to teach Nakata how to use the internet perhaps we can help answer his question rather than go off topic...

    (Original post by ToneUK)
    There are many people on this forum including myself who have experience of the postgraduate application process and have applied from new universities, to traditional universities, and vice versa and have been successful.
    Even more importantly there are people on the forum that actually know something regarding the courses the OP has asked about. Saying that once upon a time someone from a new uni applied and gained a place to a traditional uni (congrats btw) isn't particularly enlightening re: the OP's question of an MSc Finance at a top school.

    Top 5 MSc Finance programmes do not come under the banner of 'business courses' as you have mentioned - they are a very different animal. What is perceived as uni snobbery is more likely to be a question of whether the candidate (in general) is suitably prepared for the difficulty of these courses. Answering that question, I suspect, is more complicated than just looking at the name of the Uni - the admissions tutor will be more interested in whether the specific courses taken (at whatever uni) were quantitative enough. Obviously this has been answered already when the tutor knows the school/degree specifically ie LSE/UCL/OX/Cam/KCL candidate; high scores in suitably named modules at any uni will go a long way here.

    How much credit an application will be given for work-experience/extras is very dependant on the specific programme. LBS put a higher weight on this for example - but the work-experience needs to be very relevant with exposure to actual finance and not simply general work skills. And it will not compensate for poor academics, but it may swing a decision for on-par candidates.

    I do in general agree with your view that "if you meet the requirements, put an application" however what someone from any Uni needs to keep in mind for top 5 MSc Finance is that the minimum simply wont be enough. How can you exceed the minimum so you're not fighting every issue just to get in. Ace the GMAT, get a 1st and do some extra remedial stats and linear algebra study on the side... then it wont matter what uni you went to, they'll want you.
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    (Original post by hoodwink199)
    This is good advice in general - take caution of anything you read online. Now if we're done trying to teach Nakata how to use the internet perhaps we can help answer his question rather than go off topic...



    Even more importantly there are people on the forum that actually know something regarding the courses the OP has asked about. Saying that once upon a time someone from a new uni applied and gained a place to a traditional uni (congrats btw) isn't particularly enlightening re: the OP's question of an MSc Finance at a top school.

    Top 5 MSc Finance programmes do not come under the banner of 'business courses' as you have mentioned - they are a very different animal. What is perceived as uni snobbery is more likely to be a question of whether the candidate (in general) is suitably prepared for the difficulty of these courses. Answering that question, I suspect, is more complicated than just looking at the name of the Uni - the admissions tutor will be more interested in whether the specific courses taken (at whatever uni) were quantitative enough. Obviously this has been answered already when the tutor knows the school/degree specifically ie LSE/UCL/OX/Cam/KCL candidate; high scores in suitably named modules at any uni will go a long way here.

    How much credit an application will be given for work-experience/extras is very dependant on the specific programme. LBS put a higher weight on this for example - but the work-experience needs to be very relevant with exposure to actual finance and not simply general work skills. And it will not compensate for poor academics, but it may swing a decision for on-par candidates.

    I do in general agree with your view that "if you meet the requirements, put an application" however what someone from any Uni needs to keep in mind for top 5 MSc Finance is that the minimum simply wont be enough. How can you exceed the minimum so you're not fighting every issue just to get in. Ace the GMAT, get a 1st and do some extra remedial stats and linear algebra study on the side... then it wont matter what uni you went to, they'll want you.
    This is good advice, and the reason why threads exist is that points can be developed. I do not have specific knowledge of MSc Finance programmes and can only advise on a general level.

    The reason why I 'pounced' on one of the replies before me was because the individual based on his profile information, and his response had not actually been through the postgraduate process.

    I do endorse your advice, if a course is heavily weighted with quantitative study then one would expect to favour an undergraduate course which provides similar grounding.
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    (Original post by Will1692)
    In the nicest possible way, surely he would already be at a better university currently if he had the "well-rounded" skills etc?
    This is wrong. Nobody is stupid just because they go to a lower-ranked university.
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    (Original post by passenger17a)
    This is wrong. Nobody is stupid just because they go to a lower-ranked university.
    did i say he was stupid? Your must be for thinking that. Im just saying if your not at a good university at undergraduate level for any paticular reason, its unlikely due to the applicants per place thing to get in from a lower ranked place for a postgrad course!
    Unless he has some special circumstances there must be some reason he isnt at a top uni now, hoping to get into a top ranked place now?
    God some people............
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    As it has been mentioned earlier, a very strong GMAT score might well make a difference. For example, the Finance programme at Cam does not require a GMAT, but applicants are encouraged to do it and if you submit a score, the cut-off is 780 on the quant section!

    Another route could be a couple of years of work exp and applications to those schools which give significant weight to work experience e.g Imperial, LSE , Warwick...

    Lastly, as hoodwink199 has mentioned, admissions to finance programmes at top 5 are completely different from admissions toother courses at the same universities.Try to do all the hard courses (linear algebra, differential equations, real analysis etc), I kow these help a lot in separating the cream from a batch of top applicants.

    I am on the Cambridge Mphil Finance programme at present, if you have any questions regarding that please feel free to pm me..
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    (Original post by Will1692)
    did i say he was stupid? Your must be for thinking that.
    I certainly don't.
 
 
 
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