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    (Original post by lookingtoteach)
    hey guys,


    Your thoughts appreciated...

    thanks peeps
    Try ringing up these unis and asking if they run any sorts of access courses for PGCE, or if they offer a maths refreshers that will qualify you for entry - get on the phone, cos it can't hurt to ask.

    Anyways, if you don't make september entry, you could always apply direct for febraury start - its worth a short if being a maths teacher is what you wanna do
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    My only suggestion would be reapplying next year, and maybe taking some OU courses in the meantime. Some institutions really don't mind the lack of a Maths degree, whilst others are unwilling to make concessions, so apply to the ones which are a bit more lenient!
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    There is no 50% mathematics requirement for mathematics teaching. I know someone who has been offered two secondary mathematics PGCE places for Sept 2010 with a Fine Art degree and no qualification in mathematics beyond GCSE.

    She is currently taking a MEC (mathematics enhancement course) at the University of Wolverhampton. This course appears to cover a lot of the content of A Level mathematics but does not go any further so I don't think it would plug any gaps in your knowledge or understanding I'm afraid.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    There is no 50% mathematics requirement for mathematics teaching. I know someone who has been offered two secondary mathematics PGCE places for Sept 2010 with a Fine Art degree and no qualification in mathematics beyond GCSE.
    Wow!! :eek: :eek:
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    (Original post by darigan)
    Try ringing up these unis and asking if they run any sorts of access courses for PGCE, or if they offer a maths refreshers that will qualify you for entry - get on the phone, cos it can't hurt to ask.

    Anyways, if you don't make september entry, you could always apply direct for febraury start - its worth a short if being a maths teacher is what you wanna do
    isn't a MEC the access course/ maths refresher. If that is the case, im back to square one.

    Ive emailed the IoE for a possible second interview, the opposed the idea explicitly. Kings have said, given the stark increase in applications they wont consider anyone w/o a maths degree.

    I haven't contacted the UEL as to why they rejected me. I intend to do so on Mon/Tue. See if i can take any feedback from them.

    Ive thought about starting in a month as opposed to september, however im unsure how this works. If i start in february 2011, when do i finish. From what ive heard, a year is too packed for a pgce course, nevermind 6/7 months. :o:
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    (Original post by zxczxc)
    My only suggestion would be reapplying next year, and maybe taking some OU courses in the meantime. Some institutions really don't mind the lack of a Maths degree, whilst others are unwilling to make concessions, so apply to the ones which are a bit more lenient!
    Yeah im thinking of withdrawing my application and reapplying next year. The thing is, im not really to keen on asking my referee for a reference. Hes done soo many for me already; starting to feel very inconsiderate.

    I think i need to look more closely into the whole OU courses scenario.


    thanks zxczxc
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    There is no 50% mathematics requirement for mathematics teaching. I know someone who has been offered two secondary mathematics PGCE places for Sept 2010 with a Fine Art degree and no qualification in mathematics beyond GCSE.

    She is currently taking a MEC (mathematics enhancement course) at the University of Wolverhampton. This course appears to cover a lot of the content of A Level mathematics but does not go any further so I don't think it would plug any gaps in your knowledge or understanding I'm afraid.
    Hey Mr M,

    Is this directed at me. If so, im confused as to whether i should then bother taking up the MEC.

    Thanks Mr M.
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    Im just wondering, should i choose the take up the option of the MEC can i do it with the open uni? and can i do it by myself (im assuming that is what open uni is all about) and then just sit the exams.

    Its just that i dont want to sit around another 6 months before starting my PGCE should anyone choose to enrol me. Im working currently, hence ideally if i could enroll asap and finish by july would that help. The issue then is i dont have a uni to attend my PGCE placement in sep 2010. And if i do wait another year, whats to say unis wont question me if i can still recall the maths given i havn't be practising for a year. :eek3:
    :confused:
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    I was in a similar situation. I want to teach English but have a Psychology degree. For this reason, King's weren't interested in me. However, I have managed to secure a place at IOE because I taught English in China for a year and tutored GCSE students in English. I also made sure I highlighted how much my degree could help in my interview (studying learning theories etc.)

    I'd really recommend trying to get a tutoring position. Have you tried applying to a company called 'Explore Learning'? They hire English/Maths tutors. Alternatively, you could try working for a private tutoring company. Finally, look for Study Supervisor positions in schools, where you would get the chance to cover lessons for teachers.

    Lots of candidates will have TA experience but not all of them will have actually worked in a teaching capacity, so this will help you to stand out.

    Hope this helps!
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    (Original post by lookingtoteach)
    Is this directed at me.
    Yes, it was. I haven't been present at any of your interviews so I have no idea what the problem might be but your difficulties with english might be one of them. I don't think your subject knowledge would present a huge barrier. Can you remind me what your degree was in?
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    (Original post by betheliza)
    Lots of candidates will have TA experience but not all of them will have actually worked in a teaching capacity, so this will help you to stand out.
    The person I was talking about who attained two PGCE secondary mathematics positions without any mathematics qualifications beyond GCSE had one year's experience as a cover supervisor.
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    (Original post by betheliza)
    I was in a similar situation. I want to teach English but have a Psychology degree. For this reason, King's weren't interested in me. However, I have managed to secure a place at IOE because I taught English in China for a year and tutored GCSE students in English. I also made sure I highlighted how much my degree could help in my interview (studying learning theories etc.)

    I'd really recommend trying to get a tutoring position. Have you tried applying to a company called 'Explore Learning'? They hire English/Maths tutors. Alternatively, you could try working for a private tutoring company. Finally, look for Study Supervisor positions in schools, where you would get the chance to cover lessons for teachers.

    Lots of candidates will have TA experience but not all of them will have actually worked in a teaching capacity, so this will help you to stand out.

    Hope this helps!
    hey there,

    I am currently a TA at a school. The school and staff have been fantastic towards me whenever possible they have given me the opportunity to teach maths to younger children.

    I really dont think its my experience that is lacking although the added experience never hurts, i just feel its because i dont have a degree in maths.

    The pgce tutor at kings told me word for word that my application in general was good and in previous years would have secured me an interview, its just this year there were a huge increase in application hence they could no longer take on non maths graduates.

    Thanks for company references, i will endeavour to check them out.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    Yes, it was. I haven't been present at any of your interviews so I have no idea what the problem might be but your difficulties with english might be one of them. I don't think your subject knowledge would present a huge barrier. Can you remind me what your degree was in?
    Economics.

    Mr M, if its not too much trouble, could you let me know your thoughts about my view on applying via the open uni(posted at 10:26). thanks
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    (Original post by lookingtoteach)
    Economics.
    An economics degreee backed with A Level mathematics is a perfectly adequate background for training to teach mathematics to 11-16 year olds. I cannot see any benefit in you taking a MEC apart from £££ (some institutions pay you to take the MEC but you have to have an offer of a PGCE place first).

    I understand you have been told there has been an increase in applications in London due to the recession. Have you considered looking outside London? Outside the capital, training institutions cannot afford to be so selective!
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    An economics degreee backed with A Level mathematics is a perfectly adequate background for training to teach mathematics to 11-16 year olds. I cannot see any benefit in you taking a MEC apart from £££ (some institutions pay you to take the MEC but you have to have an offer of a PGCE place first).

    I understand you have been told there has been an increase in applications in London due to the recession. Have you considered looking outside London? Outside the capital, training institutions cannot afford to be so selective!
    I'd much rather than not take the MEC even though you may get paid. Id have to leave my job in which case, i would be financially disadvantaged.

    The thing is, with kings, im pretty sure they train you to teach 11-18 as opposed places like ioe who train 11-16. I think KCL may be slightly worried training a non maths graduate who enters FE to teach maths when possibly unable to at a high enough level, albeit passing his or her PGCE. This clearly would reflect adversely towards KCL.

    I honestly dont think i could leave london. I did live up north for abit, it was a pleasent experience but i kept feeling i was constantly missing out on things back in london. I think, that feeling just grows within you after living the through the hustle and bustle of london for soo long.
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    Have you considered GTP? I don't know how hard it is to get onto one in London but it would be relatively easy to find a GTP mathematics place with an Economics degree in my area.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    Have you considered GTP? I don't know how hard it is to get onto one in London but it would be relatively easy to find a GTP mathematics place with an Economics degree in my area.
    On the tda website, they themselves have said GTP is very tough to get into and considering they're stance is to narrow the gap in teaching posts, it does seem to say alot, albeit they didn't subject specify.

    I dunno about GTP, sounds abit iffy to me(though im sure its not). I would feel like im being robbed of a qualification. Silly to think this i know. Seeing everyone i know taking the pgce route, seems so much easier to simply jump on the bandwagon.
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    (Original post by lookingtoteach)
    On the tda website, they themselves have said GTP is very tough to get into and considering they're stance is to narrow the gap in teaching posts, it does seem to say alot, albeit they didn't subject specify.

    I dunno about GTP, sounds abit iffy to me(though im sure its not). I would feel like im being robbed of a qualification. Silly to think this i know. Seeing everyone i know taking the pgce route, seems so much easier to simply jump on the bandwagon.
    To be honest it seems like you are going to have to make some decisions.
    If you want to do a PGCE course this year then you might have to make some sacrifices and move away somewhere random for a year - remember you can always move back to London the year later.

    You've been rejected by various places who want your degree to be in maths. Its not and there is little you can do about that now beyond look for places which will accept an economics degree with maths A level, as has been said - there are plenty of places. Obviously Goldsmiths might come back to you with a positive response but you may as well start looking for other options.

    Yes, its a rubbish situation but if you want it badly enough you'll have to make some decisions about moving etc.

    I live in Scotland and our application system is so much harder than in England this year as places on PGDE programmes have been cut by around 80% meaning the acceptance rate for primary is about 5%. Therefore, the universities rejected the vast majority of applicants pre interview then only did one or two days of interviews in Jan then if you don't get in, thats it - you either have to go to England or wait a year because your 2nd choice is already full as we only have 6 or 7 PGDE providers in the entire country. This is what has happened to me and I'm now trying to make a plan involving moving to England.... if you want it badly enough you'll move somewhere else for a year. At least if you want to teach in England it doesn't matter where you train - I have the added problem that if I want to move back to Scotland after (which I do) an English PGCE will make it much more difficult as the education systems are so different. But I don't really have another choice!

    Basically, as much as it is a bad situation the only thing you can do is move on from here and try to make another plan rather than dwelling on things you can't change.
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    (Original post by oxymoronic)
    To be honest it seems like you are going to have to make some decisions.
    If you want to do a PGCE course this year then you might have to make some sacrifices and move away somewhere random for a year - remember you can always move back to London the year later.

    You've been rejected by various places who want your degree to be in maths. Its not and there is little you can do about that now beyond look for places which will accept an economics degree with maths A level, as has been said - there are plenty of places. Obviously Goldsmiths might come back to you with a positive response but you may as well start looking for other options.

    Yes, its a rubbish situation but if you want it badly enough you'll have to make some decisions about moving etc.

    I live in Scotland and our application system is so much harder than in England this year as places on PGDE programmes have been cut by around 80% meaning the acceptance rate for primary is about 5%. Therefore, the universities rejected the vast majority of applicants pre interview then only did one or two days of interviews in Jan then if you don't get in, thats it - you either have to go to England or wait a year because your 2nd choice is already full as we only have 6 or 7 PGDE providers in the entire country. This is what has happened to me and I'm now trying to make a plan involving moving to England.... if you want it badly enough you'll move somewhere else for a year. At least if you want to teach in England it doesn't matter where you train - I have the added problem that if I want to move back to Scotland after (which I do) an English PGCE will make it much more difficult as the education systems are so different. But I don't really have another choice!

    Basically, as much as it is a bad situation the only thing you can do is move on from here and try to make another plan rather than dwelling on things you can't change.
    Thanks for the post...the reality does seem quite bleak. I think im going to possibly withdraw my gttr app. and re-apply next year and in the mean time look for GTP posts (Where can i find on?).

    BTW whats happened in scotland in regards to pgde intakes? How come theres been such a stark decrease in places?
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    (Original post by lookingtoteach)
    Thanks for the post...the reality does seem quite bleak. I think im going to possibly withdraw my gttr app. and re-apply next year and in the mean time look for GTP posts (Where can i find on?).

    BTW whats happened in scotland in regards to pgde intakes? How come theres been such a stark decrease in places?
    Basically, over the last few years they've trained too many people meaning that after your initial probation year (NQT year in England) its really hard to get a job because there just aren't any to be had, and jobs are being given to probationers as they're cheaper. Its related to the fact Holyrood made targets relating to class size reduction and nowhere has actually met the target meaning Holyrood have been training teachers at a level which will meet the new class size targets but none of them have been met, so we have a surplus. This year they've been really drastic and most courses are having places cut by at least half (secondary and primary) with primary courses being about 75/80% place reduction meaning literally hundreds of people who would previously be on courses just can't get an interview let alone a place. At least with primary, if you don't get in at your first choice you won't be getting a place at all in Scotland this year. Meaning loads of us (mostly new graduates as we just don't have the experience to compete with mature applicants) are having to try our luck in England as its much easier there.


    Why not keep your gttr application on going and then if you get an offer you don't have to make a decision yet? Obviously you only have 14 days to accept it but you could always drop out in the summer if you found something better etc as they can't force you to go.... meaning at least you will have kept your options open


    I have no idea about GTP sorry.
 
 
 
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